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Browsing the archives for the Water, Resources & Quality category.

Trump’s impact will be huge in California, where he was soundly rejected

Agriculture - California, Water, Resources & Quality

Trump’s impact will be huge in California, where he was soundly rejected

Sacramento Bee

Farmers from California’s Central Valley invested big time in Donald Trump, and soon the president-elect could repay the debt. During a Tulare County campaign event in late August that raised an estimated $1.3 million, Trump heard about the farmers’ need for water, among other issues. As president, he’ll appoint the people who can turn the taps, at least a little.

“The good thing is, he is more up to speed on water infrastructure than any other president we’ve had,” Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Visalia, said in an interview Wednesday. “Out here, everything is water, water, water.”

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California: Sites Reservoir backers prepare to seek bond money

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather, California water, Dams other than Klamath, Water, Resources & Quality

PNP comment:  Finally some movement on this situation! This is where the California Water Bond money should go, not to the destruction of the Klamath dams. — Editor Liz Bowen

Sites Reservoir backers prepare to seek bond money

Capital Press

Backers of the proposed Sites Reservoir west of here believe they have plenty of momentum going into next year’s application period for Proposition 1 water bond funds.

The number of agencies signed on to participate in the project has grown from 14 to 34, including from the San Francisco Bay area and San Joaquin Valley, said Jim Watson, general manager of the Sites Authority. And the Legislature recently passed Assembly Bill 2553, a bipartisan measure that will give flexibility in construction methods to help speed the project.

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Miners’ “Waters of the United States” Challenge to U.S. Supreme Court

Clean Water ACT - EPA, Courts, Federal gov & land grabs, Water, Resources & Quality

From: Mountain States Legal Foundation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: William Perry Pendley, 303/292-2021, Ext. 30

Miners’ “Waters of the United States” Challenge to U.S. Supreme Court

October 4, 2016 –

DENVER, CO. A 120-year-old nonprofit, non-partisan mining trade association with thousands of members today joined with other litigants in urging the Supreme Court of the United States to review its lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and their top officials over newly released final rules that purport to define “waters of the United States” in the Clean Water Act (CWA) after odd rulings from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. The American Exploration & Mining Association (AEMA) (once Northwest Mining Association) of Spokane, Washington asserts that the rules published on June 29, 2015, violate both the Regulatory Flexibility Act and the Administrative Procedure Act. AEMA is represented by Mountain States Legal Foundation (MSLF), which commented on the draft rules by arguing that they illegally: extend to all waters (not just wetlands) and all waters adjacent to non-navigable interstate waters; create a new jurisdictional concept “similarly situated waters” by misquoting the Supreme Court; and ignore the Court’s demand regarding alleged wetlands adjacent to non-navigable tributaries.

“We ask the Court to answer a question of great national importance, that is, whether Congress intended a definitional rule delineating the scope of the Clean Water Act to be reviewed exclusively in the court of appeals, or, as the plain text of the law provides, in the federal district courts,” said William Perry Pendley, MSLF’s president.

Over the years, landowners challenging federal wetland rulings reached the Supreme Court of the United States. In 1985, deciding at which point “water ends and land begins,” the Supreme Court upheld a definition that included wetlands that “actually abut[] on” traditional navigable waters. In 2001, the Court held that “non-navigable, isolated, intrastate waters,” even those used by migratory birds, were not within the CWA. In 2006, ruling on whether the CWA included intrastate wetlands adjacent to non-navigable tributaries of navigable waters, the Court vacated the Corps’ rules. For a four judge plurality, Justice Scalia required a “continuous surface connection to bodies that are ‘waters of the United States’ in their own right,” but Justice Kennedy, while concurring in striking down the rules, demanded “a ‘significant nexus’ to waters that are or were navigable in fact or that could reasonably be so made.”

In 2007, the EPA and the Corps responded to the Court’s rulings and in late 2008, after the receipt of 66,000 comments, issued new guidance on identifying “waters of the United States.” Then, in 2011, the two agencies proposed new guidance that expanded significantly the reach of the CWA, including over vernal pools, prairie potholes, natural ponds, and playa lakes. In response to 230,000 comments, many of which demanded a formal rule-making, the agencies issued that proposal in April of 2014.

The three separate judgments of the Sixth Circuit panel denying all motions to dismiss the petitions for review for lack of subject matter jurisdiction was entered on February 22, 2016, and the Sixth Circuit denied a petition for rehearing en banc on April 21, 2016.

Mountain States Legal Foundation, founded in 1977, is a nonprofit, public-interest legal foundation dedicated to individual liberty, the right to own and use property, limited and ethical government, and the free enterprise system. Its offices are in suburban Denver, Colorado.

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Water contractors sue federal government for $350 million

Agriculture - California, Lawsuits, Liberty, Water rights, Water, Resources & Quality

By The Associated Press

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) – Seventeen California water districts have filed a lawsuit for $350 million against the federal government for not delivering water to contractors in the drought year of 2014.

The Fresno Bee reports (http://bit.ly/2dUTACL ) that the districts in the San Joaquin Valley and the city of Fresno filed the suit Wednesday in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims in Washington, D.C.

Attorney Craig Parton, who is representing the contractors, says the claim seeks to recover the fair market value of Friant Division water not delivered to the contractors even though there were sufficient supplies in Millerton Lake that year.

The lawsuit says farmers lost crops due to lack of water and had to remove orchards, deplete groundwater supplies and take emergency measures.

Attempts to reach the Bureau of Reclamation, which controls Millerton Lake and Friant Dam, were unsuccessful.

___

Information from: The Fresno Bee, http://www.fresnobee.com

http://www.redding.com/news/state/water-contractors-sue-federal-government-for-350-million-jmgurnpublicidaporgac5c4a2f8e564246a55458ff-396152561.html?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_content=&utm_campaign=TopHeadlines_Newsletter

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Opinion: Learn from history … fight to keep your water

California water, Op-ed, Water rights, Water, Resources & Quality

PNP comment: Looks like the coho salmon is the only fraud perpetrated on farmers and ranchers and fishermen. — Editor Liz Bowen

OPINION: Learn from history … fight to keep your water

Modesto Bee

At an important meeting last week in Modesto, The Bee reported, Francisco Canela, a member of the Stanislaus County Water Advisory Committee, asked one of the state’s top water regulators a great question:

“Where’s the end game for this community? That’s our concern. We’re giving more water and more water, and we aren’t getting anything back.”

The short answer to Canela’s question is that the community will never get back any water or anything else.

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Who will go extinct first, salmon or Valley farmers?

Agriculture - California, Endangered Species Act, Hypocrisy, State gov, Water rights, Water, Resources & Quality

PNP comment: Enviros and government agencies NOT sharing the water is an issue throughout California. — Editor Liz Bowen

Who will go extinct first, salmon or Valley farmers?

Modesto Bee

Here, on the front lines of the state’s recently declared water war, we have more questions than ammunition. Is the State Water Resources Control Board serious? Is the water board even in charge? Was Gov. Jerry Brown’s call for “voluntary agreements,” instead of regulatory demands, a suggestion or an order? Who will go extinct first – salmon or farmers?

OK, that’s a rhetorical question; salmon have a huge head start. But the race isn’t over. To recap: Battle was enjoined Sept. 15 when the water board re-released its justification for taking more water from the Merced, Tuolumne and Stanislaus rivers – which combine to create the San Joaquin before it reaches the Delta.

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News from California Farm Water Coalition

Water, Resources & Quality

End of summer finds California’s water supply in better shape, but critical shortages remain

KFSN

The drought is far from over, water supplies are generally up across the state. “In most areas, we are definitely doing better than we were last year,” said Michael Jackson, Bureau of Reclamation.

Jackson notes Millerton Lake is at 108-percent above its normal level for this time of year. Meaning the growers who depend on water from behind Friant Dam got most of what they expected. “We allocated, currently, in the Friant system, what’s called 75-percent class one.”

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Water rights discussion at Yreka Patriots meeting 8-30-16

TEA Party, Water rights, Water, Resources & Quality

Yreka Tea Party Patriots

Meeting for Tuesday, Aug. 30th

6:30 PM at the Covenant Chapel Church

200 Greenhorn Rd.   Yreka 

Speakers:

Angelina Cook

Stewardship Coordinator

Mt. Shasta Bioregional Ecology Center

                 Speaking in favor of Measure H

Groundwater Management Initiative Seeking to Amend Siskiyou County Code

and

Andy Fusso

Treasurer Mt. Shasta Bioregional Ecology Center 

Speaking against “Measure G” 

            The Siskiyou County General Retail Sales Tax Measure”

                                                                                                                    Be an informed voter, plan to attend                  

                                                                                     

Free….no membership.  Doors open at 6PM, come early to socialize with likeminded people.

Questions, Contact Louise @ 530-842-5443

I highly recommend that you read the measures before you come to the meeting so that you can ask informed questions. See instructions below on where to find the ballot measures:

To read text of Measures H and G go to:

https://www.co.siskiyou.ca.us/page/clerk-registrar-of-voters

Click on Elections, Registrar of Voters  (first paragraph on the page)

Scroll down the page to find G and H

Here is a very short description of the ballot measures that will be discussed at  this meeting.

MEASURE H

Groundwater Management Initiative Seeking to Amend Siskiyou County Code.

Shall the County of Siskiyou amend Articles 1 through 3 of Chapter 13 of Title 3 of the Siskiyou County Code to extend the requirement to obtain a groundwater extraction permit to all other groundwater sources in the County not currently defined as a groundwater basin when groundwater is extracted for use outside the County, and to remove the permitting exemption for commercial water bottling enterprises?

Measure G

.25% general sales tax for the County which can be used to pay on a loan for a new jail.  The tas  will end when the loan is paid off.

 

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Fish disease prompts river flushing

Air, Climate & Weather, California water, Endangered Species Act, Federal gov & land grabs, Hypocrisy, Klamath River & Dams, Salmon and fish, Trinity County, Water, Resources & Quality

PNP comment: While it is commendable to want to help inland resident trout, low summer flows are the typical type of summer environment they live in — and do survive. Anyone claiming there is a need to artificially pulse the rivers — in hot August and September — are buying into the lie that it helps salmon.

It actually targets and stimulates the salmon that are happily playing in the ocean to start swimming inland, when there is not sufficient water flows for them. (Pulsing artificially suggests that the autumn rains have arrived  — of which they have not!)

So the salmon will begin swimming up river, when the trouts’ disease and the back-to-normal low water flows will greatly endanger the lives of the salmon. What a bunch of disgusting bunk and fraudulent science pulsing truly is. Why would anyone want to bring the salmon up river before the real autumn rains naturally raise the water flows? — Editor Liz Bowen

 

By Damon Arthur of the Redding Record Searchlight

Posted: Yesterday 6:58 p.m.

To prevent an outbreak of a deadly fish-killing disease, federal officials plan to begin tripling the amount of water flowing out of Lewiston Dam and into the Trinity River.

Starting Thursday, the amount of water coming out of Lewiston Dam will increase from 450 cubic-feet per second to about 1,300 cfs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which operates the dam.

The Trinity River flows into the Klamath River and the higher flows in the Trinity are meant to aid salmon and trout in the Klamath.

Federal officials and others are worried about an outbreak of a disease called ich, which spreads among fish crowded into slow-moving pools of warm water in the river. The higher flows from the Trinity are supposed to flush out the lower Klamath with cooler water and reduce crowding among the fish.

A small number of fish have become infected in “extremely warm water” in the Klamath, said Michael Belchik, a senior fisheries biologist for the Yurok Tribe, which is based on the Klamath River.

An ich outbreak in 2002 killed some 35,000 salmon and steelhead trout in the river.

“We take this threat to our fish very seriously, and we’re looking at every option to protect our fish,” said Thomas P. O’Rourke, Yurok Tribe chairman. “We don’t want to go through another catastrophe like the fish kill in 2002, and we will do anything we can to avoid that outcome this year.”

The Klamath Fish Health Assessment Team, which monitors fish fitness in the river, rated danger in the stream on Wednesday at “yellow” because of unfavorable physical and chemical conditions in the stream.

There are four “levels of readiness,” for the river, starting at green, the lowest level and best conditions for fish. Levels increase to yellow, orange and red, which means a fish kill is imminent or underway, according to the team’s website.

During the past several years of warm summer weather and drought, the higher releases from Lewiston Dam have been an annual event in August and September.

This year’s higher flows, which could go as high as 3,500 cfs, are expected to last until late September.

David Coxey, general manager of the Bella Vista Water District in Redding, said sending more water down the Trinity River means there will be less water for cities and agriculture in the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys.

Nearly all the municipal water districts in the Redding area get water through the bureau.

“It’s disheartening how our supply reliability continues to erode,” Coxey said.

There is also less hydropower generated when more water is sent down the Trinity River, Coxey said.

Water is shipped via large pipes from Lewiston Lake to Whiskeytown Lake, where it is used to also generate power at the Carr Powerhouse. The water is then shipped by pipe again from Whiskeytown to Keswick Reservoir, where power is generated again at the Spring Creek Powerhouse.

Higher flows into the Trinity and Klamath rivers also ultimately mean less water flowing into the Sacramento River to aid endangered winter-run chinook salmon that spawn in the river in Redding, Coxey said.

“This is a discouraging decision that further hurts the salmon over here,” he said.

# # #

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Utah: Dam project fills American Fork creek with muck

Dams other than Klamath, Water, Resources & Quality

http://www.sltrib.com/news/4267539-155/dam-project-fills-american-fork-creek

Sediment washed down from Tibble Fork could devastate popular trout fishery.

ARTICLE PHOTO GALLERY (9)

The creek running down American Fork Canyon has become clogged with muck after an upstream reservoir was drained as part of dam rehabilitation project.

The fine-grained sediments turned water black below Tibble Fork Dam, leaving a trail of dead trout and potentially degrading habitat for all sorts of aquatic life, according to observers.

“It would be a surprise if anything could live through this. It is suffocating the fish it is so thick,” said Brian Wimmer, president of a Utah County chapter of Trout Unlimited. “There is 4 inches of this disgusting mud 3 feet above the high water mark. It will take a major flush to bring the life back to this river.”

Go to above article link for the photo:.

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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