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Browsing the archives for the Agriculture – California category.

California storms add 350 billion gallons of water to CA reservoirs

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather

Storms Add 350 Billion Gallons of Water to CA Reservoirs

Breitbart

California’s crippling five-year drought has come to a temporary halt in the northern part of the state, as roughly 350 billion gallons of water came pouring into the region’s biggest reservoirs over the past few days, boosting storage to levels not seen in years.

However, the drought still remains in effect in Southern California. According to the East Bay Times, there is so much water in the reservoirs that dam operators were forced to release water to reduce flood risks.

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Butte County Rancher David Daley is new California Cattlemen Assoc. President

Agriculture - California, cattle

President Dave Daley, Ph.D.

In addition to being a well-known animal scientist, educator and agriculture advocate, Butte County’s Dave Daley is primarily a rancher. Dave Daley was elected to serve a two year term as CCA President in Sparks, Nev. at the 100th CCA & CCW Annual Convention.

Daley runs the family ranch near Oroville alongside his children, Kyle, Kate and Rob, who are all passionate about the family business. Daley is also a professor of animal science and interim dean of the College of Agriculture at California State University, Chico, where he has been influential in the lives of other current and up-and-coming young cattlemen throughout the state.

Daley’s experience as a cow-calf producer and an educator make him invaluable to CCA and California’s beef producers. In addition to being heavily involved with CCA, Daley is also a past-president of Butte County Cattlemen’s Association, has been active in land use issues for the Farm Bureau and cattlemen; was a member of the University of California’s Animal Welfare Task Force, and co-chair of CCA’s Animal Welfare Task Force. He also serves as advisor to the Young Cattlemen’s Association at Chico State.

 

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Obama signs California’s massive water bill

Agriculture - California, California Rivers, California water, Federal gov & land grabs

Obama signs California’s massive water bill, but Trump will determine its future

McClatchy DC

President Barack Obama on Friday quietly signed and bequeathed to President-elect Donald Trump a massive infrastructure bill designed to control floods, fund dams and deliver more water to farmers in California’s Central Valley.

While attempting to mollify critics’ concerns over potential harm to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, Obama signed the $12 billion bill in a distinctly low-key act. The still-controversial California provisions were wrapped inside a package stuffed with politically popular projects, ranging from Sacramento-area levees to clean-water aid for beleaguered Flint, Michigan.

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Opinion: State’s water grab will devastate jobs, economy in Merced

Agriculture - California, California Rivers, California water, State gov

OPINION: State’s water grab will devastate jobs, economy in Merced

Merced Sun-Star

Our community’s way of life is under direct attack by Sacramento’s plan to take our water and send it to the Bay-Delta for the benefit of others.

The State Water Resources Control Board’s own document describes the resulting damage to our community as an “unavoidable impact.” This is narrow and unacceptable thinking. The Merced Irrigation District is fully prepared to protect and defend our community and water rights on the Merced River. But we believe there is a better way.

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Drought legislation for California — finally!

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather, California water

COLUMN: The drought-busting bill congress just passed might screw the endangered species act

Wired Magazine

This summer, Donald Trump visited the Central Valley and promised voters he would prioritize agricultural development in California. In his speech, the president-elect blamed the environmental laws protecting a “certain three-inch fish“—the Delta smelt—for the prolonged drought. He promised, if elected, to place the needs of farmers over fish.

But it looks like his promise is coming ahead of schedule. On Saturday, Congress passed the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act, a huge bill that protects safe drinking water, provides upgrades to infrastructure like ports, and provides $558 million dollars in drought relief for California. And most of that stuff is uncontroversial.

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Mike Dunbar: Would Times like some facts with that Kool-Aid?

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather, California Rivers, California water, CORRUPTION, Salmon and fish, Water, Resources & Quality

PNP comment: Wow, this is a great article and parallels the same knowledge we here in Siskiyou have been touting — and being ignored by the Greenies and guvmunt agency bureaucrats. Worth the read, it is! — Editor Liz Bowen

Modesto Bee

December 2, 2016

In reading a recent editorial in the Los Angeles Times, we just about choked on our Cheerios.

One of our nation’s truly great newspapers, with inspiring editorial writers, the Times noted that California is more than merely lines on a map. Invoking the “California condor, the giant sequoia, the golden trout,” the writer implied that farmers in Stanislaus, Merced and San Joaquin counties have lost sight of what it means to be Californians. Since we’re all in this state together, folks living around here should be happy to give up more of the water that flows through our communities to save salmon.

If we get rid of all those lines, how can anyone justify pumping billions of gallons of water hundreds of miles from the rivers where it once flowed, away from the ocean to which it was headed, through deserts, over mountains, and into giant tubs for the future use of people who’ve never heard of the Tuolumne River?

What the editorial didn’t mention was wading into the Tuolumne to count spawning salmon carcasses; visiting the hatchery where millions come to life on the Merced; spending millions of dollars pushing around gravel in the Stanislaus to make rock beds suitable for salmon eggs. Don’t know how the Times missed that.

So where did the Times’ editorial writers get their information? We’re guessing from trusted sources in the environmental community. That’s fine; we talk to them, too. We just recognize they’ve got a point of view and an agenda.

If the Times had talked to anyone here – including the scientists who work most closely with the thousands of salmon that swim up our rivers each year – they might have gotten a different story. They might have learned that the salmon here are no different genetically from the 720 million tons of salmon harvested each year. That the number of salmon native to our rivers is actually zero. That any salmon you find on the San Joaquin or its tributaries was born in a hatchery. The fish the environmentalists are trying to save are already extinct.

Like so many others, the Times decried the harm farming does to the state’s “$1 billion fishing industry.” But according to the state, the best commercial salmon catch in this century was worth $15 million – less than half the value of the crab fishery.

There’s more. The Times blamed the drought and agriculture for catastrophically low salmon counts – disregarding the role played by state officials, who released too much cold water from Lake Shasta at the wrong time last year, dooming thousands of salmon and trout. Or the federal officials who insisted on releasing 35,000 acre-feet of cold water from New Melones to push juvenile salmon and steelhead to the ocean; but the fish refused to go, waiting until it actually rained to swim out.

The Times has millions of readers; here’s part of what it told them: “In this sixth year of drought, the agriculture industry and its supporters have pushed hard for diverting every scarce drop of water flowing down streams and rivers to orchards and field crops instead of, as they often describe it, allowing good water to be flushed downriver, through the Delta, into the San Francisco Bay and out to sea.”

Except that’s not true. First, virtually every resident of this area wants to see vibrant, beautiful rivers flowing through our communities. Hundreds volunteer to clean the riverbanks, plant trees, clear floodplains and many make donations. Second, our irrigation districts, county officials and local legislators quietly negotiated a deal to provide an additional 300,000 acre-feet of water for environmental purposes on top of the 20 to 30 percent already flowing to the ocean. But that offer – a year in the making – was ignored as it moved up the ladder.

Now our region is in a life-and-death struggle with the state over a plan that will double the water flowing away from one of California’s poorest regions – all for roughly 1,100 additional salmon. Did the Times’ environmental sources mention any of that?

As much as we admire the Times’ prize-winning editorial writers, they shouldn’t allow themselves to be spoon-fed by anyone.


The Public Policy Institute of California’s water experts offered an interesting idea Friday through The Sacramento Bee. Instead of building twin tunnels to carry the Sacramento River beneath the Delta, Gov. Jerry Brown should build just one. Two 40-foot-wide tunnels can siphon off virtually all of the Sacramento River; just one can’t. Skeptics have long noted that the Sacramento provides 80 percent of the Delta’s water, and it’s impossible to provide more reliable water deliveries south and simultaneously save the Delta. Eliminate one tunnel, the PPIC says, and eliminate that skepticism.

Barbara Barrigan-Parrilla of Restore the Delta liked the idea. But in her enthusiasm, she took aim at the Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Merced rivers – echoing the state’s demand for 50 percent flows. She didn’t mention that 95 percent of the Delta has been channelized, leading to the demise of the Delta smelt. Not a word about tearing down levees to allow sinking islands to flood and create more habitat. Nothing about getting rid of striped bass that feast on smelt and juvenile salmon.

Apparently it’s less about restoring the Delta than about getting more water. It always is.

Read it here: http://www.modbee.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/mike-dunbar/article118612498.html#storylink=cpy

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Drought in California may be over

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather

Fall snow, rains have ‘satisfied the drought debt’ in Northern Sierra Nevada, climatologist says

Los Angeles Times

At Heavenly Ski Resort, thousands of feet up in the northern Sierra Nevada, the heavy snowfall around Lake Tahoe forced the lodge to close its small roller coaster due to poor visibility this week.

In the days leading up to Thanksgiving, concerns over dry conditions were quickly dispatched when more than two feet of snow dropped around the lake in just two days

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Siskiyou County: Off road vehicle discussion at the Board of Supervisors 12-6-16

Agriculture - California, Siskiyou County

1:30 P.M. – BOARD OF SUPERVISORS’ REQUESTS

A.            SUPERVISOR BRANDON CRISS

Discussion and possible direction re a progress update concerning a proposal to develop an Off-Highway Vehicle Ordinance to allow OHV travel on unauthorized public roads and various community concerns presented in a citizen petition.

PNP comment:  During the Scott Valley Protect Our Water meeting on Dec. 1, 2016, Ray Haupt, Dist. 5 Siskiyou Co. Supervisor, thanked Jerry Bacigalupi for bringing this possible county ordinance to his attention as there had been no discussions among the supervisors about it. Ray has received other concerns  from farmers and ranchers regarding the expansion of these designated routes onto their private property. He has received complaints about the proposal expanding mixed-road use becoming another uncontrollable nuisance to private property owners adjacent to these proposed designated county roads.

After investigation, Ray talked to county counsel and the county administrator about possible liabilities regarding mixed use of county and state roads for  ORV. He has asked if the studies, processes and CEQA analysis’ have been done? They have not.

As a result, Ray told us the agenda item will not be the reading of the new ordinance, as first thought, but will be a discussion item.

Donna Bacagalupi voiced her frustration over the proposed map of combined use and proposed roads and trails that would  be available to ATVs and motorcycles near and crossing their property.

It looks like this proposed ordinance by an off-road vehicle group was not well thought out and the environmental and property rights impacts have not been taken into consideration.

Private property rights supporters said they will attend the meeting and voice their concerns.

Agriculture: Farmers and ranchers that use ATVs, motorcycles and slow-moving vehicles are able to use the county and state roads, if they have the triangle slow-moving sign on the back of their vehicle, so the proposed expansion of mixed-use of roads does not affect them. They are already exempt.

— Editor Liz Bowen

 

 

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Santa Barbara defenders of wolves will give presentation to Siskiyou Supervisors on Dec. 6, 2016

Agriculture - California, cattle, Wildlife, Wolves

PNP comment: I doubt if any of their suggestions refer to the reduction of wolf numbers! We do not need wolves in Siskiyou County. There are plenty in other areas and in Canada. Wolves are not threatened or endangered with extinction. The species are thriving! WE have an over abundance of predators like mt. lions, bears, bobcats, foxes and coyotes. There isn’t enough wildlife to support the additional predator of wolves in Siskiyou County. — Editor Liz Bowen

From Dec. 6, 2016 Siskiyou County Board meeting agenda

10:15 A.M. – PUBLIC REQUESTS

A.            SISKIYOU COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

Presentation of the annual Siskiyou County Tourism Improvement District report and progress to-date information.

B.            NATURAL RESOURCES/UC SANTA BARBARA-DEFENDERS OF WILDLIFE

Presentation of findings from a study aimed at helping livestock producers in Northern California to reduce the likelihood of conflicts with wolves.

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Trump’s impact will be huge in California, where he was soundly rejected

Agriculture - California, Water, Resources & Quality

Trump’s impact will be huge in California, where he was soundly rejected

Sacramento Bee

Farmers from California’s Central Valley invested big time in Donald Trump, and soon the president-elect could repay the debt. During a Tulare County campaign event in late August that raised an estimated $1.3 million, Trump heard about the farmers’ need for water, among other issues. As president, he’ll appoint the people who can turn the taps, at least a little.

“The good thing is, he is more up to speed on water infrastructure than any other president we’ve had,” Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Visalia, said in an interview Wednesday. “Out here, everything is water, water, water.”

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