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Browsing the archives for the Klamath Bucket Brigade.org category.

Vote for Klamath Bucket from 2001 water shut-off

CORRUPTION, Klamath Basin Crisis.org, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org, Klamath County, Klamath River & Dams

PNP comment: The giant bucket was placed at the Klamath County Courthouse to remind everyone of the travesty, when the Greenies and federal government shut-off water to the Klamath Falls to Tulelake area using fraudulent science for sucker fish in the Upper Klamath Lake. I traveled to Klamath Falls and covered the May 2001 Bucket Brigade of over 15,000 folks dumping water illegally into the A Canal. I took photos of California Congressman Wally Herger, Siskiyou County Supervisors and other elected officials dumping buckets of water into the A Canal.  It was quite the Protest.

I voted the Klamath Bucket, which represents the Klamath Bucket Brigade Protest, should be at the county courthouse. It is time that our voice outnumbers the liberal Greenies and corrupt government agency bureaucrats. — Editor Liz Bowen

KBC News

Friends.
PLEASE VOTE!

Because of an upcoming movie being filmed in Klamath Falls, the Klamath County Commissioners agreed that the big Bucket Brigade Bucket could be moved temporarily for the movie. In wee hours of the morning, one commissioner moved the bucket. The receptionist at the gov’t building said it was moved until they found a new home, which was not exactly truthful.

Now the Herald and News is doing an online vote to muster votes to get rid of the bucket from the courthouse. Environmental activists and Indians don’t want it at the courthouse. They are voting.

Please vote and have your friends vote.

We who are voting for resource users: farmers, ranchers, loggers, miners…we are voting to return the bucket to the courthouse.

http://www.heraldandnews.com/breaking/what-should-be-done-with-the-bucket-brigade-bucket/poll_ef241626-2c9d-11e4-9387-0019bb2963f4.html#.U_wRiu265-E.email

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News gathered by Klamath Bucket Brigade 5-30-12

Agriculture, Hoopa Tribe, KBRA or KHSA, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org, Klamath River & Dams, Property rights, Tribes

Tribe Wants End To Short-Term Klamath Dam Relicensing · Oregon Public Broadcasting · EarthFix

http://earthfix.opb.org/water/article/california-tribe-asks-feds-to-stop-licensing-klama/

Tribe asks feds to resume Klamath dams relicensing

San Jose Mercury News – ‎4 hours ago‎

By JEFF BARNARD AP Environmental Writer Frustrated that a deal to remove a string of hydroelectric dams from the Klamath River in Northern California has stalled, the Hoopa Tribe has petitioned federal authorities to restart the bureaucratic process in

Hoopa Tribe asks FERC to resume relicensing process to speed removal of

The Republic – ‎4 hours ago‎

Frustrated that a deal to remove a string of hydroelectric dams from the Klamath River in Northern California has stalled, the Hoopa Tribe has petitioned federal authorities to restart the bureaucratic process in hopes it will get the dams out of the

Tribe Asks Feds To Order Removal Of 4 Klamath Dams · OPB News

http://news.opb.org/article/tribe-asks-feds-order-removal-4-klamath-dams/

Tribe Asks Feds To Order Removal Of 4 Klamath Dams

Amelia Templeton

May 30, 2012

A California American Indian tribe asked federal regulators Tuesday to order the removal of four dams on the Klamath River. The tribe says a restoration plan for the river is stalled.

The Klamath River runs through the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s reservation.

The tribe says the four dams upriver contribute to toxic algae blooms and salmon diseases. Power company PacifiCorp owns the dams and has signed a deal that would remove them by 2020. Thomas Schlosser is an attorney for the Hoopa Valley Tribe. He says the tribe doubts Congress will ever approve the current dam removal deal.

“That legislation isn’t going to pass. It subordinates Indian water rights. It costs 800 million bucks. And it has a whole lot of other controversial provisions,” he said.

The tribe wants federal regulators to stop extending PacifiCorp’s license to operate the dams. Bob Gravely, a spokesman for PacifiCorp, says the plan to remove the dams by 2020 is still on track.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s web site – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

No Comments

Oregon ag has winners and losers in primary

Agriculture, Elections, KBRA or KHSA, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org, Klamath County, Klamath River & Dams

Oregon ag has winners and losers in primary | capitalpress.com

http://www.capitalpress.com/content/ml-elections-051612

By MITCH LIES

Capital Press

May 16, 2012

SALEM — Oregon agriculture lost some long-standing supporters in the May 15 primary elections, but may have gained some new ones.

Among the victims was five-term incumbent Rep. Mike Schaufler, D-Happy Valley, who fell to challenger Jeff Reardon by 32 percentage points.

“(Schaufler) was a passionate supporter of farmers and foresters,” said Katie Fast, director of government affairs for the Oregon Farm Bureau.

“I was very disappointed in losing Mike Schaufler,” said Paulette Pyle, grass roots coordinator for Oregonians for Food and Shelter. “He was a good urban vote for natural resources.”

One-term incumbent Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, also lost big to former state Rep. Tim Knopp by 36 percentage points in the Senate District 27 Republican primary.

“We endorsed Telfer,” Fast said, “but when Tim Knopp was in the House, he was a good advocate on natural resource issues.”

And Oregon Farm Bureau first vice president and State Board of Agriculture member Tracey Liskey has lost a close race against Gail Whitsett in the House District 56 Republican primary. Whitsett, wife of Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Klamath Falls, was just over 500 votes ahead of Liskey as of 9 a.m. May 16, 4,962 to 4,455.

The two were running to replace Rep. Bill Garrard, R-Klamath Falls, in the heavily Republican district.

“Obviously we are disappointed,” Fast said of the outcome. “The Farm Bureau was excited to see Tracey Liskey in the Legislature. On the other hand, I have known Gail for a number of years. She will be a good representative for Oregon agriculture.”

“I think Gail will be a star,” Pyle said.

Pyle also spoke highly of Bill Hansell, a farmer and Umatilla County commissioner, who won the Republican primary in Senate District 29 by 22 percentage points.

“That strengthened the understanding of natural resources in the Republican caucus,” Pyle said.

Hansell will run unopposed in the November general election to replace four-term incumbent Sen. Dave Nelson, R-Pendleton, who is not seeking re-election.

And Pyle was excited to see Brooks Tree Farm owner Kathy LeCompte win the House District 22 Republican primary.

“We very supportive of (LeCompte),” Pyle said. “She’s a personal friend and a good friend of the industry.”

LeCompte lost to incumbent Rep. Betty Komp, D-Woodburn, in the general election two years ago.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s web site – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

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Interior to signal preference on Klamath dams

KBRA or KHSA, Klamath Basin Crisis.org, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org, Klamath River & Dams, Salmon and fish

Interior to signal preference on Klamath dams | capitalpress.com

http://www.capitalpress.com/newsletter/TH-klamath-follow-up-w-infobox-030912

By TIM HEARDEN

Capital Press

March 7, 2012

YREKA, Calif. – Though U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar won’t be making a formal determination on the Klamath dam removal project, the government will still tip its hand later this spring.

Work is continuing on a final environmental document that will choose a “preferred alternative” among six options, which range from doing nothing to fully dismantling the four dams in Southern Oregon and Northern California.

In addition, an overview report on the scientific studies unveiled last fall are undergoing a peer review. The final environmental analysis and scientific report will be out this spring, Salazar’s office indicated last week.

After public and written comments were taken on the environmental documents last fall, “now what we do is look at all the comments and provide responses to the comments,” said Matthew Baun, a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service here.

Salazar will choose from among five alternatives in the environmental impact statement, which include full removal of all the dams; partial removal while leaving some structures behind; removing only two of the four dams; and installing fish passages around the dams, Baun said.

The document will provide a clue of Salazar’s intentions even though he said he would not be able to make a formal determination by a March 31 deadline. He cited several reasons, including that Congress has not yet passed an authorization bill.

Meanwhile, critics of the dam removal proposal are focusing on a complaint letter sent by former U.S. Bureau of Reclamation science adviser Paul Houser, who claims he was fired after raising concerns about how his superiors were characterizing the draft environmental documents and scientific studies to the public.

In a Feb. 24 letter to the Interior Department’s executive secretariat and regulatory affairs office, Houser alleged officials wrote a summary and news release to elicit support for dam removal while downplaying negative remarks from scientists that were in the full reports.

“My disclosure was clearly made to people who had authority to fix the press release … and people who had influence on the Secretarial decision process,” Houser wrote. “My disclosure was never directly addressed, and supervisors have used my probationary status to enact reprisal for the disclosure culminating in the termination of my employment …”

Houser, who is a professor at George Mason University in Virginia, did not return a call to his office seeking comment.

Government officials noted that Houser’s complaints had to do with how the environmental analysis and scientific studies were presented to the public, not the documents themselves. Interior spokeswoman Kate Kelly said Houser’s allegations are being reviewed as called for under the department’s scientific integrity policy.

“Interior has established a strong scientific, public input and peer review process that is guiding the studies that will lead to a decision” on the dams, she told the Capital Press in an e-mail.

Online

Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement studies and EIS/EIR: http://klamathrestoration.gov

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s web site – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

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Truth is told by Mark Anderson on Klamath dams

Agriculture, Agriculture - California, California water, Dept. Fish & Game, Federal gov & land grabs, Greenies & grant $, KBRA or KHSA, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org, Klamath River & Dams, Oregon governments, Salmon and fish, Siskiyou County, State gov, Threats to agriculture, Tribes

http://www.nw-connection.com/archives/NWConn_Mar12_v3.pdf

Lies, Dam Lies, and Peer Review—Removing the Klamath Dams

The Northwest Connection,

March 2012, Page 15,

by Mark Anderson

Back in 2008 when Nancy Pelosi and Barack Obama were in full-spin mode—“campaigning”—they talked about how government needed to be more transparent?  Of course, what they meant by “transparent” and what most people mean by “transparent” are two entirely different things. Loosely translated, “transparency” means, “You’ll see what we want you to see.”

It’s like the Wizard of Oz putting on a front.  But every now and then, when you do get a peek behind the
curtain, it’s so ugly and so unbearably shocking that one actually hopes to be struck blind, praying to God you didn’t see what you just saw.

Case in point is what’s happening in the Klamath Basin and the effort by the far left to remove the dams.
The Wizard wants you to think this has been a transparent and therefore legitimate process where very divergent groups—the tribes, the power company, environmentalists, fisheries, farmers, and ranchers—came to “consensus.”

And all of the decisions were based on scientific and therefore impartial studies.

That ain’t how it happened. Squint if you need to, but let’s take a peek behind the curtain.

First off, the “public meetings” held in the Klamath Basin, designed to build consensus, were anything but public.

Oregon State Senator Doug Whitsett (R- Klamath Falls), talked to me on the I Spy Radio Show and told me something that, to this day, I find blindingly offensive. The meetings were only open to a select few—mainly to those the organizers knew in advance were predisposed to removing the dams. The meetings were closed to the press, closed to the public, closed to public officials, and if you did get in, you had to sign a confidentiality agreement beforehand that said you wouldn’t discuss anything said in the room. And that you would agree to the outcome no matter what it was. If you didn’t agree to those preconditions, you weren’t allowed in.

This is a clear and, in my mind, violent abuse of the public meeting laws.

The use of the word “violent” is not accidental. We have information that someone who came out of that meeting was so distraught, and took such a shock to his sensibilities, that he committed suicide.

There is also good evidence that the PacifiCorp, the power company that holds the leases on the dams, was strong-armed into the agreement. Publicly agree and things will go well for you; disagree, and it won’t matter because we won’t renew the dams’ lease anyway. I could be wrong, but I suspect the mafia creates “consensus” this exact same way.

After the “agreement,” the only obstacle in their way was a pesky little thing called funding. Even the most strident environmentalist won’t do anything if someone else isn’t paying for it. To keep the appearance of still needing to make up his mind (it’s pretty clear he already has when he’s said publicly it would be “un-Americanto vote against removing the dams), Interior Secretary Ken Salazar commissioned a report for dam removal to provide an “assessment of science and technical information.”

In other words, what’s it going to cost, how many fish will be saved, and what would be the environmental and economic impacts of dam removal.

Naturally, this report is based on sound, “peer reviewed” science (you know, that thing that causes—I mean, “confirms” global warming). Peer reviewed is the “gold standard” for anything scientific.

We talked with Dr. Bob Zybach, who has a Ph.D. in Environmental Science from OSU and who also spent 20+ years in forestry, about this whole peer-review process.

If you’re like me, you assumed “peer review” meant fact checking, devil’s advocate, and
even a standardized process to this. Nope. Not one bit.

Each “peer review” makes up its own rules. Imagine practicing law in hundreds of different
courts where each court had its own procedural rules and laws. That’s the peer review
process. As Dr. Zybach put it, “[it’s] checking out each other’s models for whether they’re
functional statistically, but not checking them out as far as assumptions…

And among me and my friends, we all like the Dodgers, so we have consensus.”

You can guess how this “peer reviewed” study turned out.

By the way, I should mention that Dr. Zybach is part of the Environmental Sciences Independent Peer Review Institute (www.esipri.org), which is comprised of current and retired scientists who want to reform the peer-review process. They just launched last month.

So where are we at now? Sec. Salazar is due to make his decision in March, and back
in Nov. 2011, Sen.Merkley introduced a bill to codify (fund) the Klamath Agreement. Strange—wouldn’t you think you should wait for the Secretary to make up his mind before you ask to fund his decision?

The end of the page is fast approaching, so I’m going to have to resort to bullet points
(this is what happens when you try to condense 4 hours of radio and dozens of hours of research into a 1,500-word article):

The report says this will only cost $291 million but that’s only to remove the dams. Merkley’s bill requests $750 million—and you know that’s low-balling it.  That total does not account
for the economic loss of power by yanking out four fully functioning dams—another $1.3 billion—or replacing them with politically favored green power. Minimum total costs, $2–3 billion.

$200 million of this is going to come from PacifiCorp ratepayers—to tear down dams that currently power their homes.

The report forecasts an 83% increase in fish, which sounds like a lot but if you remember
your math that’s not even doubling the population (which would be 100%).

We’re spending $3 billion and not even doubling the fish population?

The study doesn’t account for the disposal costs for the 22 million tons of accumulated silt
behind the dams. According to Sen. Whitsett, that’s a line of quad-axel dump trucks
stretching 12,500 miles.

Dam-removal proponents assume (hope) the silt will wash out to sea and not choke the Klamath. However, this is exactly what happened on similar rivers. Sen. Whitsett and his geologist wife believe it’s a disaster in the making.

According to Congressman Tom McClintock (R-Granite Bay, CA), the study does not count the more than 1 million adult fish from the Iron Gate fisheries. If counted, these fish would multiply the number of “official” fish by more than 22.5 times, thereby grossly undercounting
the fish in the river.

If the dams are pulled out, the fishery is also slated to be destroyed—along with the
million-plus fish it generates.

To demonstrate “public support” for dam removal, the study sent out 10,000 surveys—not just to the Klamath Basin but nationwide.  Respondents were encouraged to reply, “even if you have never heard of the Klamath River.” That’s right. People in Ohio and Massachusetts can now weigh in on what we do here in Oregon. (Some good news: Oregonians are now qualified to weigh in on traffic flow in New York City.)  76% of these non-scientific surveys were sent to people outside the Klamath Basin.

It should be blindingly obvious that this agreement and process has been hugely flawed and that pre-determined outcomes have been based on nothing short of outright lies by the
environmentalists who want to return the river to its pre-historic (pre-man) condition. (If this
bugs you, isn’t it worth a call to Sen. Merkley’s office to say you’re opposed to his bill?)

Fortunately, Congressman McClintock sits like a dam blocking all this. As the chair
of the subcommittee that would hear this, he is solidly against it. However, he realizes
dam-removal supporters may try to slip it in another bill to bypass his committee. That,
or simply hope McClintock and the Republicans are voted out. Once that happens, all bets are off.

I’ve said it before: Oregon is the Petri dish for all things environmental and it does not
stop here. This is a test of their methods. According to an eye witness, in a December 2010 meeting in Klamath Falls, the Commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation called removing the Klamath dams a “precedent setting event,” indicating to those who heard it that the Snake and Columbia are next.

There is a colossal fight ahead. Just one of the dam removal proponents, American
Rivers, has dedicated $100 million to taking out dams all over the country.

But this is also why we need to stand with our neighbors in Klamath. If we can’t stop this here and now, no river is safe.

If you’d like to hear our interviews with Sen. Whitsett, Cong. McClintock, and Dr.
Zybach, they’re available as free downloads from www.ispyradio.com .

Mark Anderson is an MBA and the host of the I Spy Radio Show, heard Saturdays, 11-noon, on KYKN (1430-am) in the greater Salem area or anywhere via kykn.com. Podcasts are also available after the show airs via www.ispyonsalem.com  He can be reached at mark@ispyonsalem.com .

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s web site – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

No Comments

Alleged embezzling biologists in Del Norte Court

Klamath Bucket Brigade.org, Sham Science, Yurok Tribe

Biologists McAllister, LeValley in court Thursday – Times-Standard Online

http://www.times-standard.com/localnews/ci_20086112

 

Biologists McAllister, LeValley in court Thursday

Megan Hansen

The Times-Standard

March 2, 2012

Two men suspected of embezzling more than $870,000 from the Yurok Tribe using falsified invoices appeared in court Thursday in Del Norte County.

Mad River Biologists’ senior biologist Ron LeValley, 65, and associate biologist Sean McAllister, 45, were arrested Feb. 23 on $1 million warrants for burglary, embezzlement and conspiracy to commit a crime.

Del Norte County District Attorney Jon Alexander said both men appeared in court Thursday for bail review hearings. McAllister, whose bail was reduced by a judge Monday to $50,000, appeared out of custody and his bail remained at $50,000. He posted bail Monday evening.

Alexander said LeValley was still in custody but that a judge reduced his bail to $150,000. The judge ordered that LeValley surrender his passport and check in with the probation department every day if he posts bail. Alexander said he argued that LeValley’s bail should remain at $1 million.

”Records indicate his small business submitted 75 invoices for work not done,” Alexander said, adding that LeValley’s international travels for biological research would make it easier for him to find places to flee.

Alexander said more than 30 people attended LeValley’s bail review in support of the biologist. He said Eureka attorney Bill Bragg, LeValley’s attorney, submitted more than 65 letters to the judge that voiced support for LeValley.

Bragg couldn’t be reached for comment Thursday by the Times-Standard. Eureka attorney Greg Rael, McAllister’s attorney, also couldn’t be reached for comment.

Alexander said the case has garnered interest from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

”We’ve been in discussions with the federal government about them trying the case, given these were federal funds,” Alexander said.

Officials are still searching for former Yurok Tribe Forestry Director Roland Raymond, 49, who is alleged to have embezzled funds with McAllister and LeValley. In addition, he’s suspected of embezzling approximately $30,000 from the tribe through other false purchase requests.

Alexander said Raymond is still wanted on a $1 million warrant. He said Raymond was last seen the morning of Feb. 23 before law enforcement officials arrived at Raymond’s house with arrest and search warrants. He said there is a nationwide BOLO, which stands for “be on the lookout,” for Raymond’s arrest.

”It would definitely be in Mr. Raymond’s best interest to surrender,” Alexander said.

Megan Hansen can be reached at 441-0511 or mhansen@times-standard.com.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s web site – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

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Fish, cattle and potatoes: Food production a way of life

Agriculture, Agriculture - California, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org

http://pioneer.olivesoftware.com/Olive/ODE/HeraldandNews/

Up & Down the Klamath River 

 

H&N’s staff photos

By SARA HOTTMAN

H&N Staff Reporter

February 12, 2012

     From farming to ranching to fishing — there’s plenty of diversity up and down the Klamath River. But folks from here to the coast have a lot in common, too, including the chief reason for doing what they do: the lifestyle.

   At this end of the Klamath River we harvest potatoes; at the other end they harvest fish and crabs. “We” and “they” have plenty of differences, but there is much in common: in particular, the river.

   On its winding path through Oregon and California, the Klamath River connects diverse agricultural and food industry businesses and workers, and people deal with several similarities: natural resources, including the river, are key to operations; regulations affect their stakes in land and water resources and how they run their businesses; and volatile prices and markets affect sometimes elusive profits.

   People up and down the Klamath River have one other common trait: (usually) they love what they do — it’s the lifestyle as much as the money.

   Food production of all types is a way of life all along the Klamath. In Klamath County, row crops are important. And tricky.

   “Any profit in a potato said Dan Chin, owner of Merrill-based Wong Potatoes, which plants 4,000 acres of specialty and russet potatoes, wheat and grains, and onions in Klamath and Siskiyou counties.

   Just down the river, the landscape changes.

   “On the river here ,there isn’t the land (for big farms). The land is too broken up,” said Kathy Bishop, a Seiad Valley rancher who lives on California State Route 96, which traces the Klamath River’s curves through Siskiyou and Humboldt counties.

   “We all do a little bit of small-scale farming for food,” she said. “People raise a couple animals for food, veggies, fruit trees.”

   Growers in Klamath County and fishermen who hunt at the mouth of the Klamath each season grapple with volatile prices influenced by a world market. The sustenance farmers in between work what they call “real jobs” and consider their 50 or so animals a hobby.

   Gary Rainey, who has free-range cattle in Horse Creek along Route 96, said even though he and his wife work other jobs, it’s never occurred to them to leave their ranch.

   “It’s kind of thankless, but it’s a way of living,” Rainey said. “Whether you’re working potatoes, you’re a commercial hay grower or you’re doing what we do, quite often the return isn’t as big as the effort you put into it, but it’s a way of life.”

   All the way down the river, those feelings are mutual.

   “In corporate culture, guys are always asking, ‘How much longer are you going to put up with this crap?’” said Dave Bitts, a Eureka based commercial fisherman. “In fishing it’s, ‘How much longer do you think you’re going to be able to do this?’ ”

   Consumers in the area realize that, producers said. Part of the region’s identity is tied to consumers’ access to locally-grown organic potatoes from Chin’s farm, fresh butternut squash from the Bishops, fresh beef from the Raineys or snapping Dungeness crab from Bitts’ boat.

   “We have influence beyond economic significance,” Bitts said. “It’s part of this place’s sense of self. If you want, you can come down and buy crabs or tuna. It’s what this place is.” •

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s website – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

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DFG will allow more irrigation woes in Siskiyou

Agriculture - California, Dept. Fish & Game, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org

PNP comment: DFG continues, unfairly, to place the burden of the production of fish on farmers and ranchers. In truth, landowners enhance their activities to provide significant habitat for fish and wildlife. It is the return of adult salmon in the fall that lays the eggs inland. But ocean life, fishing and over-netting by Yuroks and Kuroks kills the returning adults. Yet, government, tribes and those who have not walked in our shoes continue to place the burden 150 miles inland! Outrageous. — Editor Liz Bowen

Irrigation rules could get tighter in Siskiyou; DFG drops appeal of ruling that enforcement is too lenient » Redding Record Sea

http://www.redding.com/news/2012/feb/08/irrigation-rules-could-get-tighter-in-siskiyou/

Irrigation rules could get tighter in Siskiyou; DFG drops appeal of ruling that enforcement is too lenient 

By Ryan Sabalow

Record Searchlight

February 8, 2012

In a move that could signal more irrigation restrictions for Siskiyou County’s farmers and ranchers, the Department of Fish and Game has backed away from appealing a judge’s ruling that said wardens were being too lenient on those pulling water from two chronically dry coho salmon streams.

Last week the department’s lawyers told a state appellate court they were dropping an appeal over San Francisco County Superior Court Judge Ernest H. Goldsmith’s ruling from last year.

Goldsmith had ruled in favor of some Klamath River Indian tribes and fishing and environmental organizations that had sued the state’s fisheries regulators contesting a permitting system that allowed farmers on the Scott and Shasta rivers watersheds to take irrigation water from the streams.

Goldsmith’s ruling suspended the DFG’s irrigation water permitting system, while the agency re-evaluated the extent irrigation is harming fish to comply with the state’s environmental laws.

In their suit, environmental groups argued that the Shasta and Scott are key habitat for Klamath-run coho, which are at 2 percent of their historic numbers.

The fish have been listed as threatened by federal and state fisheries regulators.

The permitting system allowed farmers to continue to drain the streams during dry months, harming fish in the streams, the suit alleged.

The DFG appealed, arguing the permitting system, though hugely unpopular with ranchers, was a solution that struck a balance between enforcing the state’s fisheries-protection laws while allowing farmers to continue to earn a living.

It’s unclear what the DFG may do now.

“As far as the future, we’re reviewing our options on what’s next, but we look forward to improved communications with local communities, local government, tribes and conservation organizations,” DFG spokeswoman Jordan Traverso said in a statement.

Traverso didn’t address why the DFG backed away from the appeal.

The appeal reversal is hardly the end of the court fight over the permitting issue on Scott and Shasta.

A separate case the Siskiyou County Farm Bureau filed last year challenging whether the DFG has legal authority to issue the permits has a hearing scheduled for next week in Siskiyou County.

The farmers contend the permitting system infringes on their water rights. They argue the law the DFG was suddenly enforcing has been on the books for decades, and it’s never been used to limit irrigation before.

The Department of Fish and Game’s attorneys have asked that a Siskiyou County judge make a ruling. The agency’s and the farm bureau’s attorneys will present arguments at Tuesday’s hearing in Yreka.

 

 

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NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s website – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

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Report backs $1 billion plan to raise dam; Some relocation is necessary, but agriculture, wildlife benefit

Dams other than Klamath, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org

There are 85 readers comments on this article at the link below  ~  Barb Hall of Klamath Bucket Bridage

Report backs $1 billion plan to raise dam; Some relocation is necessary, but agriculture, wildlife benefit » Redding Record Sea

http://www.redding.com/news/2012/feb/06/report-backs-1-billion-plan-to-raise-dam-raising/

Report backs $1 billion plan to raise dam; Some relocation is necessary, but agriculture, wildlife benefit

By Damon Arthur

Record Searchlight

February 6, 2012

A draft report released Monday by federal officials says a $1.07 billion plan to raise Shasta Dam by 18½ feet is feasible and economically justifiable.

Raising the dam would increase the lake’s storage about 14 percent, benefitting agricultural and municipal water users in the state, according to the Shasta Lake Water Resources Investigation draft feasibility report.

Raising the dam also would benefit salmon and steelhead trout that migrate up the Sacramento River by providing a more reliable supply of cold water for spawning, the feasibility report says.

But some roads, buildings and businesses around the lake would be inundated by the higher lake level, said Pete Lucero, a spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the agency that prepared the report.

Lucero said some of the resorts on the lake would have to be relocated, but he did not know which ones.

The higher lake level would not affect Interstate 5 nor any of the I-5 bridges across portions of the lake, he said, and some of the secondary roads around the lake could be inundated by higher water.

Raising the dam height 18 ½ feet would actually increase the depth of the lake 20 feet, the report said.

“Although higher dam raises are technically feasible, 18 ½ feet is the largest dam raise that would avoid extensive and costly relocations, including moving the Pit River Bridge and Interstate 5,” the report said.

With a higher dam and the lake full, water levels would be just 4 feet from the bottom of the Pit River Bridge, the report said.

Matt Doyle, general manager of Lake Shasta Caverns, said that if the lake level were raised 18½ feet, a building used to sell tickets and snacks, as well as some of the roadway on the property, would be covered by water.

Despite the potential effect on the business, Doyle said he was not against raising the dam.

“We’ve supported the dam raising, just as long as recreation is recognized,” Doyle said.

But recreation is recognized as one of the secondary objectives of raising the dam, along with hydropower, Sacramento River Delta water quality, flood control and improving the ecosystem around the lake.

Lucero said it is far from a done deal that the dam would be raised. He said the feasibility report issued Monday is just in draft form and another environmental analysis on increasing the dam height is only in “preliminary draft” form.

“We have a long way to go, bottom line,” Lucero said.

Bureau officials have been studying raising the dam since 1999. Work on the current feasibility study started in 2005.

The report says there are still unresolved issues, including whether or not raising the lake level would violate federal law that says the McCloud River “should be maintained in its free-flowing condition, and its wild trout fishery protected.”

The report also says that the Winnemem band of the Wintu Indians has raised concerns that raising the lake level would flood sites that are culturally and religiously important to the tribe.

The study also looked at the feasibility of raising the dam 6½ feet and 12½ feet. But the report concludes the 18½-foot increase would be the most economically, technically and environmentally feasible.

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NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s website – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

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More Klamath Bucket statements

Agriculture, Agriculture - California, Federal gov & land grabs, Klamath Bucket Brigade.org, Klamath County

PNP comment: We totally agree. Many of us were in Klamath Falls on May 7, 2001, when 15,000 showed up to support the first BUCKET BRIGADE. — Editor Liz Bowen

http://pioneer.olivesoftware.com/Olive/ODE/HeraldandNews/

Bucket reminds us of remaining work   

Herald and News

Letter to the Editor

February 7, 2012

   A few days ago a guest commentary, written by an individual who recently moved here from Sacramento, urged the removal of the bucket from in front of the county administration building and suggested it was time for the county to “move on.” I strongly disagree.

   The bucket is emblematic of the willingness of the citizens of Klamath County to resist the idiotic dictates of the federal government. Donated to the community from our supporters in Elko, Nev., the bucket also represents the support of others across the West. It embodies the very character of Klamath County. As such, I can’t think of a location more fitting than its present one.

   Beyond that, the controversy out of which the bucket was created remains unresolved. The Endangered Species Act remains unchanged and a sucker still trumps a human. If you don’t believe that, just wait until spring if the current dry winter weather pattern persists.

   Many changes have occurred in our area over the last 30 years or so to accommodate the influx of moneyed retirees from California. The gun stores on Main Street are all gone — replaced by wine stores. The Running Y offers them an upscale enclave with the illusion of rural living but the amenities of urban life — all comfortably insulated from the pedestrian swill of Klamath Falls. Many more changes have been made and will continue to be made for the comfort of newcomers — but we should not be asked to compromise on the fundamentals.

   The bucket reflects the generally conservative views of our citizens — the belief that government of the bureaucracy, by the bureaucracy, for the bureaucracy cannot long endure. For those seeking a more progressive atmosphere in their adopted community — Bend is just a couple of hours up the road.

   Kevin Rafferty

   Klamath Falls

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NOTE: In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted
material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have
expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit
research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

This information and much more that you need to know about the ESA,
the Klamath River Basin, and private property rights can be found at The
Klamath Bucket Brigade’s website – http://klamathbucketbrigade.org/index.html
please visit today.

No Comments
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