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Liberal News Publishes SUPPORT of Joe Robertson

Clean Water ACT - EPA, CORRUPTION, Courts, CRIMINAL, Federal gov & land grabs, PRES. TRUMP, President Trump and officials

Redoubt News.com

A section of the president’s executive order instructed the EPA administrator and the attorney general to review all pending litigation under the WOTUS rules.

Trump should rescue 78-year-old Navy veteran that Obama put behind bars

BY FORMER REP. TOM TANCREDO (R-COLO.), OPINION CONTRIBUTOR
05/17/17

(The Hill) – In February, President Trump signed an executive order revoking the notorious, unconstitutional expansion of the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority, otherwise known as the “Waters of the United States” (WOTUS) rules promulgated under President Obama in August 2015. Those rules interpreted the Clean Water Act to give the agency authority to regulate every puddle of water on every farm or ranch anywhere if that puddle had even the remotest, most minuscule “nexus” with any “navigable waterway,” no matter how minimal that possible runoff may be or how far away that potentially navigable stream might be.

A section of the president’s executive order instructed the EPA administrator and the attorney general to review all pending litigation under the WOTUS rules.

Unfortunately, that action can have no effect on Clean Water Act cases already prosecuted by the EPA, such as what happened to Joe Robertson in federal district court in Montana. Robertson was prosecuted and convicted of violating the Clean Water Act as interpreted by the EPA, the Army Corps of Engineers and an Obama-appointed U.S. attorney. Robertson is now halfway through an 18-month sentence in a federal facility in Lakewood, Colo. (The facility is located about five miles from my home, but I am unable to visit him because prison rules bar Robertson from having visitors he did not know before his conviction.)

Western rancher and 78-year-old Navy veteran Joseph David Robertson’s modest 200-acre ranch is located in the mountains behind Basin, Mont., off Interstate 15 between Butte and Boulder. The property is 60 miles from the Jefferson River, the nearest river that might be considered a “navigable waterway” under a generous definition of the term. Nevertheless, the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers claimed he had polluted the waterway by dredging and constructing a couple of ponds near his home to be used mainly for local firefighting.

Those EPA “WOTUS” rules were controversial from the beginning when published in draft in 2014. Thirty-one states sued to block the rules when first proposed, and 13 states later tried to persuade the EPA to delay the final rule’s implementation in August 2015. Pacific Legal Foundation attorneys Todd Gaziano and M. Reed Hopper called the rules “more EPA Overreach” in an Aug. 3, 2015, Forbes report on the egregious federal power grab.

In June of 2015, the Nebraska attorney general put the matter in constitutional perspective, saying, “The EPA has redefined ‘waters of the U.S.’ in order to gain greater authority and power over private land.” Regrettably, the EPA proceeded to implement its notorious rules and then prosecuted landowners who ran afoul of the agency’s expansive interpretation of threats to clean water.

The EPA’s first effort at punishing Robertson ended in a hung jury, so Obama’s federal prosecutor moved the case to Missoula to get a conviction. Robertson had only an appointed public defender, who Robertson asserts provided an ineffective legal representation. For example, an independent expert analysis of the water runoff question done gratis by a retired EPA employee was barred from consideration as part of his sentencing report.

Robertson is attempting to appeal his conviction, but he is in poor health and his 18-month sentence likely would be completed before any appeal can be adjudicated. He may not survive long enough to see a higher federal court repudiate his unjust prosecution under an unconstitutional regulatory edict.

The decent and appropriate resolution for Joe Robertson’s unjust imprisonment caused by EPA arrogance is an immediate presidential commutation of his sentence to time served. He deserves a full pardon and an apology, but a commutation will at least give him his freedom.

I am writing to Attorney General Jeff Sessions to request an expedited review of the case and timely action to recommend a commutation by President Trump. I hope others will join me in seeking some small token of justice for Joe Robertson.

Tom Tancredo represented Colorado’s 6th Congressional District from 1999 to 2009.

Liberal News Publishes SUPPORT of Joe Robertson

 

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Reversing Obama, Trump EPA reaches deal with Pebble Mine developer

Clean Water ACT - EPA, Federal gov & land grabs, GOLD

ADN.com

May 12, 2017

Author:

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency has settled an ongoing lawsuit with the Pebble Limited Partnership and says the company can apply for a federal permit for its proposed massive gold and copper mine in the Bristol Bay watershed.

Friday’s announcement reverses the Obama administration’s efforts to prevent progress of the world’s largest undeveloped trove of gold and copper. The settlement ends several legal battles ongoing since the EPA issued a proposed determination in 2014 that would have put the area off-limits for a federal mining permit.

Salmon fishermen, Alaska Native organizations in the Bristol Bay region and environmental groups have been fighting the proposed gold, copper and molybdenum mine for more than a decade, saying it imperils the world’s largest salmon run, a significant source of income for Alaskans. The groups said they were dismayed by the Trump administration’s decision.

Mining advocates say the gold alone is worth more than $300 billion, and that the federal government should allow the process to advance without early intervention from the EPA. Mine companies have already spent roughly $800 million on the project.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said early Friday that the agency is committed to allowing the process to move forward, but isn’t prejudging the outcome.

“We understand how much the community cares about this issue, with passionate advocates on all sides,” Pruitt said. “The agreement will not guarantee or prejudge a particular outcome, but will provide Pebble a fair process for their permit application and help steer EPA away from costly and time-consuming litigation. We are committed to listening to all voices as this process unfolds.”

The new approach promised by the Trump administration offers significant hope for the Pebble Mine purveyors, but the process ahead will take years. Depending on the timing of the permit application, federal review and public input, the ultimate decision could easily sit with a new administration if President Donald Trump is not reelected in 2020.

The Pebble Limited Partnership plans to recast its plans, focusing on a smaller mine footprint, requiring new field data and infrastructure plans. And the company needs new investors, a process which could slow plans to apply for a permit by years. Funding partners for parent-company Northern Dynasty Minerals pulled out out of the project in 2013.

Ron Thiessen, president of Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd., the sole current owner of the Pebble Limited Partnership, said the mine company is now planning a “smaller project design at Pebble than previously considered, and one that incorporates significant environmental safeguards.”

MORE

https://www.adn.com/politics/2017/05/12/pebble-is-on-epa-reaches-deal-with-bristol-bay-gold-mine-company/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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History of EPA employee misconduct could result in layoffs

Clean Water ACT - EPA, CORRUPTION

PNP comment: Great news!! — Editor Liz Bowen

The Environmental Protection Agency has been riddled with employee misconduct, including workers who drink, smoke marijuana, and watch porn on the job.

Inspector general reports over the past few years detailing employee misbehavior could serve as ammunition for EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, who is seeking to eliminate 25 percent of the 15,000 employees at the agency.

Only 6.5 percent of EPA employees are “essential,” according to the government’s own calculations when it faced a shutdown in 2013. At the time, just 1,069 employees were deemed necessary to continue working during the 16 days the government closed.

The most notorious case of misconduct was the EPA official who earned $120,000 and performance bonuses after being caught watching pornography for up to six hours a day.

The geologist in the EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation downloaded over 7,000 pornographic files on an agency server and admitted to masturbating at work. He received paid leave for nearly two years after being caught.

Click for more from The Washington Free Beacon.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/04/19/history-epa-employee-misconduct-could-result-in-layoffs.html

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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WOTUS overturned! Now pardon Joe Robertson!

Clean Water ACT - EPA, CORRUPTION, Federal gov & land grabs, President Trump and officials

On the back of today’s Executive Order, Joe deserves an immediate, unconditional federal pardon.

by American Lands Council

GREAT NEWS!!! Today, President Trump has issued an executive order to “pave the way” to overturn the Obama Administration’s “Waters of the US” (WOTUS) rule.

Tragic news 🙁 Montana resident Joe Robertson is currently in federal PRISON for “violating” the same WOTUS rule that is soon to be a non-rule. In an outrageous miscarriage of justice, last year the WOTUS rule was used to incarcerate this disabled, 78-year old Navy veteran.

Joe’s “crime”? He created a series of small ponds near his isolated mountain home which, by the way, is located about 60 miles from the nearest actual “Water of the United States”. The alleged pollution was not established by any evidence at the trial.

Joe didn’t harm the environment, he helped it. Joe didn’t impact a “water of the U.S.” in any way. But that didn’t stop a ridiculously heavy handed EPA and a notorious environmental activist federal judge from using the WOTUS “non-rule” to throw poor old Joe into the clink.

Now, six months into an 18-month sentence to federal prison, in addition to tens of thousands of dollars in fines, Joe continues to suffer from declining health, confusion, and depression. He reportedly had two strokes in his first month of lock up. He was ripped from his VA medical treatment, transferred to numerous prisons over the west, thrown in solitary confinement, stripped of his veteran’s pension, unlawfully deprived of his right to be present when sensitive legal mail from his lawyer was opened, and barred from having visits from family and friends.

President Trump rightly called WOTUS

one of the worst examples of federal regulation… it has truly run amok, and is one of the rules most strongly opposed by farmers, ranchers and agricultural workers all across our land. It’s prohibiting them from being allowed to do what they’re supposed to be doing. It’s been a disaster.

WOTUS led to numerous Americans being needlessly hassled and persecuted by the federal government. Trump mentioned the case of Andy Johnson, whose case was represented by the Pacific Legal Foundation and successfully overturned:

“In one case in a Wyoming, a rancher was fined $37,000 a day by the EPA for digging a small watering hole for his cattle. His land. These abuses were, and are, why such incredible opposition to this rule from the hundreds of organizations took place in all 50 states.”

On the back of today’s Executive Order, Joe – and everyone else persecuted under this rule – deserves an immediate, unconditional federal pardon, and compensation for wrongful imprisonment.

Timeline of Events

In an egregious and horrific misuse of regulatory and judicial power against a private citizen, Joe Robertson found himself charged in May 2015 with two criminal violations of the EPA’s Clean Water Act, for “polluting waters of the United States” and one of “malicious mischief” relating to “injury/depredation of property of the United States”.

Robertson’s alleged crime was violating the Clean Water Act, because he “knowingly discharged and caused to be discharged a pollutant, namely dredged or fill material” into a “water of the United States” without a permit. Yet the said water was a seasonally flowing tributary located miles from the nearest navigable waterway. They also indicted him for damaging “National Forest Service Lands”.

The first trial, in October 2015, resulted in a mistrial as the jury was unable to reach a unanimous verdict. At a second trial in April 2016, Robertson was convicted and is currently serving his prison sentence.

No expert testimony was allowed in Joe’s defense during the trials. The U.S. government prosecutors did utilize their own experts to manufacture the case against Robertson. According to the Justice Department:

MORE

http://redoubtnews.com/2017/02/28/wotus-pardon-joe-robertson/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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West Virginia: Coal mining begins seeing revival as Trump gives industry hope

Clean Water ACT - EPA, President Trump and officials

A long-awaited revival is under way in this beleaguered Central Appalachia community where residents see coal as the once and future king.

Trucks are running again. Miners working seven days a week cannot keep up with current demand. Coal mines, long dormant after the industry’s collapse, are now buzzing again with antlike activity.

“We load coal every day for the power plant in Virginia City,” explained Rick, a long-time supervisor for a major local operation who did not want to give his last name. “There’s one shipment a week for Georgia Power, and one for Tennessee Eastman.”

The past month has seen a resurgence of the coal industry that once formed the backbone of the region’s economy, and locals credit President Trump’s aggressive, pro-energy agenda.

Crippled by a slew of factors, from changing times, an emphasis on renewable energy, and the Obama administration’s harsh penalties on coal-fired power plants, the area’s economy took a devastating hit over the past eight years. Many of the people living in these mountains had nearly given up hope that the area could ever recover.

The smaller communities in this county in southwest Virginia, such as the towns of Appalachia, Pound and St. Paul, were the hardest hit, but the ripple effects were felt far and wide.

Prospects changed nearly overnight. President Trump had promised to do everything he could to lift the coal mining industry. Trump began to make good on his pledge last month when he eliminated the Stream Protection Rule, which had placed layers of regulations on the industry.

MORE

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/03/01/coal-mining-begins-seeing-revival-as-trump-gives-industry-hope.html

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Alaska: Sullivan joins Trump for signing of executive order overturning EPA water rule

Clean Water ACT - EPA, PRES. TRUMP, President Trump and officials, Property rights

PNP comment: This is great news! — Editor Liz Bowen

ADN.com

WASHINGTON — Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan made it to the White House on Tuesday afternoon for President Donald Trump’s signing of an executive order asking the Environmental Protection Agency to redo a controversial regulation defining the agency’s reach over U.S. waters.

Sullivan and other congressional Republicans have long argued that the regulation would dramatically expand the reach of the EPA to private waters that they say should not be under the agency’s control.

On Tuesday afternoon, Trump signed an executive order that sends his EPA back to the drawing board.

Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan (fifth from the left, behind the president) joins Senate colleagues and President Donald Trump at the White House for the signing of an executive order requiring the EPA to revise its “waters of the U.S.” regulation on Tuesday. (Photo via Facebook)

Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan (fifth from the left, behind the president) joins Senate colleagues and President Donald Trump at the White House for the signing of an executive order requiring the EPA to revise its “waters of the U.S.” regulation on Tuesday. (Photo via Facebook)

In addition to Republican senators who sit on the Environment and Public Works Committee, Trump signed the order surrounded by representatives of farmers, homebuilders and county commissioners. The rule “is one of the worst examples of federal regulation,” and is “opposed by farmers, ranchers and agricultural workers all across our land,” Trump said. He called the rule “a massive power grab” and said it treats “small farmers and small businesses as if they were a major industrial polluter.”

“I applaud President Trump for his order beginning the review and roll back of the expansive overreach in the WOTUS Rule, which gave the EPA vast new authority over lands across the country, particularly in Alaska,” Sullivan said in a statement.

The regulation was finalized in August 2015, but not implemented, since the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit put a hold on it last year, during litigation that is still ongoing. But the fight over the rule has been ongoing for a decade.

Questions about the reach of the EPA, under the statutory language of the Clean Water Act, have plagued the agency since several complex Supreme Court decisions during the George W. Bush administration.

The Clean Water Act covers “navigable waters” — waters on which one can float a boat — for sure. But what has given the agency pause, through two administrations previous, is what to do about the streams and wetlands that connect to those waters, having a hydrological impact.

The issue is of major concern for farmers, real estate developers, ranchers and many others, as well as environmentalists and hunters.

The executive order won’t solve the problem in one fell swoop — it will launch a new round of rulemaking. Whatever eventual regulation the Trump administration releases will undoubtedly end up in court, and it will take years before there is a clear decision on the agency’s oversight of U.S. waters.

Sullivan argued that the executive order would “return to the rule of law and prioritizes environmental protection, keeping our waters clean without running rough shod over the Clean Water Act and our economy.”

Sullivan argued for years that the Obama administration’s “WOTUS” rule amounted to federal overreach. He delivered speeches on the Senate floor, participated in committee hearings questioning the rule, voted to overturn it, and held his own “field hearing” in Anchorage to discuss impacts of the then-proposed rule on Alaska.

He also co-sponsored legislation that would have forced the agency to withdraw the rule and start over.

Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski also praised Trump’s order Tuesday.

“The Waters of the United States or ‘WOTUS’ rule is one of the most burdensome, overreaching rules imposed by the Obama administration — a regulation with such broad reach that it could be used to impact and delay almost any development project anywhere in Alaska,” she said.

“I urge the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to reach the same conclusion that many Alaskans already have: This rule needs to be dismantled, and replaced with a better, clearer and more targeted approach that recognizes proper limits on federal authority and preserves the proper role of the states in protecting our waters,” Murkowski said.

https://www.adn.com/politics/2017/02/28/sullivan-joins-trump-for-signing-of-executive-order-overturning-epa-water-regulation/

 

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Fixing the EPA –hopefully!

Agriculture, Clean Water ACT - EPA

Why farmers and ranchers think the EPA Clean Water Rule goes too far

San Francisco Chronicle

President Trump is expected to issue an executive order directing federal agencies to revise the Clean Water Rule, a major regulation published by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers in 2015. The rule’s purpose is to clarify which water bodies and wetlands are federally protected under the Clean Water Act.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt led a multi-state lawsuit against the rule as Oklahoma attorney general, and has called it “the greatest blow to private property rights the modern era has seen.”

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US House committee urges EPA to drop opposition to Pebble mine

Clean Water ACT - EPA

adn.com

February 22, 2017

Author:

WASHINGTON — A U.S. House committee on Wednesday urged the new head of the Environmental Protection Agency to reverse the agency’s plans to limit development at the proposed Pebble project in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region.

In a letter to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, chair of the House Science Committee, charged the agency with overstepping its statutory authority under President Barack Obama.

The committee has held hearings and conducted investigations into the EPA scientists involved in the scientific assessment that was the basis for the agency’s decision. The agency’s final action is on hold during a related court case.

The Pebble project has the potential to be one of the world’s largest gold and copper mines. But the deposit sits at the headwaters of Bristol Bay, a spawning site for some of Alaska’s most prized salmon fisheries.

The project has been the subject of controversy for more than a decade, and the Pebble Limited Partnership, owned by Northern Dynasty Minerals, has not yet applied for a permit from the Army Corps of Engineers. The EPA could effectively “veto” an Army Corps permit.

https://www.adn.com/politics/2017/02/22/us-house-committee-urges-epa-to-drop-opposition-to-pebble-mine/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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What to Expect from Scott Pruitt as EPA Administrator

Clean Water ACT - EPA

PNP comment: Please remember that U.S. Senator John McCain made a BIG deal out of not showing up to vote for Scott Pruitt. — Editor Liz Bowen

|

Calvin Beisner

Calvin Beisner

|

Posted: Feb 17, 2017 4:01 PM

Town Hall. com

The Senate’s confirmation of Scott Pruitt as Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is a historic step toward the recovery of America’s Constitutional order after years of regulatory overreach.

It also puts at the helm of one of the most powerful federal regulatory agencies someone committed to the rule of law, agency transparency, and accountability to the public, and to sound science and common-sense cost/benefit calculation as indispensable parts of responsible regulation.

To nobody’s surprise, the environmental Left went apoplectic when President Donald Trump nominated Pruitt.

The Greens saw only that Pruitt had repeatedly sued the EPA, that he dared to say publicly what every climate scientist knows but dare not say (that although human contribution to global warming is pretty well certain, its magnitude and consequences are hotly debated even in the climate science community), and that he didn’t think every oil, gas, and coal company is the devil incarnate.

The reality, as the Cornwall Alliance expressed in an open letter supporting Pruitt’s nomination, signed by nearly 150 scientists and hundreds of ordinary citizens and quoted and entered into public record by Senate Environment & Public Works Committee Chairman John Barrasso (R-WY) during Pruitt’s confirmation hearing, is that Pruitt is well suited to the position:

The EPA has the crucial task of writing and enforcing regulations that apply statutes passed by Congress and signed by the President to protect the life and health of Americans. Its work necessarily integrates science, economics, law, politics, and ethics, all of which are rooted in religious worldviews. A good administrator must demonstrate expertise in at least some of these, and mature understanding of and receptivity to the insights of all. Scott Pruitt does.

Pruitt’s lawsuits—some successful, some not, some pending—against the EPA focused mainly on whether the agency had proper statutory authority for some of its regulations and had followed proper procedures in adopting them, not on whether the regulations wisely addressed real dangers, i.e., they sought to enforce the rule of law, not impose policy.

He expressed his view of climate change in an article in National Review in May of last year: “Scientists continue to disagree about the degree and extent of global warming and its connection to the actions of mankind.”

Pruitt, then Attorney General of Oklahoma, expressed that opinion, which anyone who reads the massive assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recognizes as fully consistent with them, along with Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange. They were rightly rebuking “AGs United for Clean Power,” a patently partisan group threatening civil and criminal investigation and prosecution of corporations, think tanks, and individuals who dare exercise their First Amendment rights to say they disagree with the alleged consensus that human-induced global warming is rapid and catastrophic and requires total transformation of the global energy infrastructure, costing $1 to $2 trillion per year through the rest of this century, to avert.

MORE

https://townhall.com/columnists/calvinbeisner/2017/02/17/what-to-expect-from-scott-pruitt-as-epa-administrator-n2287426

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Irony: Environmentalists Protesting North Dakota Pipeline Left Behind Tons of Waste, Could Contaminate Waterways

Clean Water ACT - EPA, PROTESTS

Town Hall.com

Matt Vespa

Matt Vespa

|Posted: Feb 16, 2017 5:00 PM

In case you missed it, the legal and bureaucratic battle over the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines is finished. We won. President Donald J. Trump signed two executive orders to move forward with the projects. The Army Corp of Engineers signed off on the Dakota Access Pipeline’s final permit. And a judge refused to hear an appeal to block the project’s construction. After Trump won the 2016 election, it was only a matter of time before the incoming president would sign off on the projects. Hundreds of protestors flocked to Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota to protest the pipeline’s construction, which activists say will desecrate their sacred burial grounds and would contaminate their drinking water along the 1,172-mile route.

There have been claims that Dakota Access LLC never consulted the local tribes about the pipeline. They were consulted 389 times. There are also archeologists on site just in case construction runs into a burial site.

Activists from across the country came to save a piece of Mother Earth, but ended up almost killing it. As the cleanup of the protest camp begins, authorities have found enough trash to fill 2,500 pick up trucks. Gov. Doug Burgum said that the amount of waste, coupled with the ending of winter and a potential spring flood, could lead to an environmental disaster concerning contamination of drinking water. The cleanup operation between the Native Americans, activists, and state officials began at the end of January (via Reuters):

Those involved said it was not an effort to destroy the camp, which sits on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers land, but a move to prevent waste contaminating water sources.

[…]

There are dozens of abandoned cars and structures as well as waste at the camp.

“It is paramount for public safety, and to prevent an environmental disaster, that the camps be cleared prior to a potential spring flood,” said North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum, a Republican who supports the completion of the pipeline, in a statement.

Via ABC News [emphasis mine]:

Federal and state officials announced plans Wednesday to accelerate cleanup at a camp in southern North Dakota that has housed hundreds and sometimes thousands of Dakota Access pipeline opponents.

Officials fear the camp near the Cannonball River will soon flood due to warm weather and rapid snowmelt. They worry trash and debris left behind by people who have left in recent weeks might pollute the Missouri River and other nearby waterways.

“With the amount of people that have been out there and the amount of estimated waste and trash out there, there is a good chance it will end up in the river if it is not cleaned up,” Corps spokesman Capt. Ryan Hignight said.

Local and federal officials estimate there’s enough trash and debris in the camp to fill about 2,500 pickup trucks. Garbage ranges from trash to building debris to human waste, according to Morton County Emergency Manager Tom Doering.

So, environmentalists protested the pipeline because they felt it could contaminate the water only to have their protests site accumulate so much crap that it could…contaminate the water. Oh, the irony, folks.

MORE

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/mattvespa/2017/02/16/irony-environmentalists-protesting-pipeline-project-in-north-dakota-have-left-mountains-of-trash-and-garbage-n2285948

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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