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Older yet faster, record-setting Iditarod champ Mitch Seavey schools a talented field

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March 14, 2017

Author:

NOME — Mitch Seavey just had the race of his life.

The 57-year-old musher from Sterling won the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race at 3:40 p.m. Tuesday, shattering the speed record by nearly eight hours to steal the title of fastest Iditarod musher ever from his much-younger son, Dallas.

Mitch remains the race’s oldest champion and has notched three wins in 13 years, his last in 2013 at age 53.

“Fifty-seven used to be old, and it’s not anymore. I’m just letting you know that,” Seavey said at a press conference after the race, his statement met by applause in the crowded building near the finish line.

‘Old guys rule’

In 4-degree temperatures Tuesday, Seavey pulled under the burled arch on Nome’s snowy Front Street with a team of 11 dogs, led by 4-year-old Pilot and 5-year-old Crisp.

Crowds lined the street, cheering on the team and taking photographs. One person held a sign that read, “Old guys rule.”

Seavey, in a puffy, red parka with a thick ruff, got off his sled and walked to the front of his team, praising the sled dogs along the way.

“Good dogs,” he told them, icicles stuck to his mustache. “Good dogs.”

He gave each dog a snack and then talked about the teamwork that allowed him to demolish the race record, arriving to Nome in 8 days, 3 hours, 40 minutes to win an exceptionally fast race. (Dallas set the prior record at age 29 in 2016 at 8 days, 11 hours, 20 minutes.)

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” Mitch Seavey said of his team’s speed throughout the race, which started March 6, in Fairbanks, and featured a temperature swing of at least 70 degrees, with lows reaching 40 and 50 below in its early days.

A month before the Iditarod began, race officials said they planned to move the official start north, from Willow to Fairbanks. The course out of Fairbanks includes more running on frozen rivers in comparison to the Willow route that sends mushers over the Alaska Range.

But, Seavey said he didn’t know if the course necessarily contributed to the fast race.

“I’m not sure whether it’s slower to go a couple hundred miles on the Yukon at 50 below or take a little hop over the Alaska Range,” he said. Still, he gave the trail the grade of “A-minus.”

‘Let ’em roll’

Throughout much of the 1,000-mile course, Seavey’s team held its speed, allowing him to pull away from the other frontrunners.

“They love speed,” Seavey said of his sled dogs. “I think it frustrated them to go too slow, so I just let ’em roll. It was scary because I’ve never gone that far that fast ever, but that’s what they wanted to do and maybe it’s a new chapter.”

Seavey’s team recorded runs that averaged 10 and 11 mph between some checkpoints and the separation he built over other racers gave him the flexibility to bank generous rest for his dogs, and himself, as they moved up the Norton Sound coast in the race’s final days.

“They only know one thing and that’s 9.5 to 10 mph and they hit their feet, and they hit their speed and that’s what they do. And they trusted me to stop them when they needed to be stopped, and feed them, and I did that, and they gave me all they could. But I guarantee they’re tired now,” said the new champion.

https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventure/iditarod/2017/03/14/at-age-57-mitch-seavey-wins-iditarod-as-its-fastest-and-oldest-champion/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Mitch Seavey poised for a 3rd Iditarod victory: ‘I felt like I was going to win it for a long time’

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March 14, 2017

Author:

WHITE MOUNTAIN — When defending Iditarod champion Dallas Seavey and his 10 sled dogs pulled into this tiny community at 1:35 a.m Tuesday, he asked about his 57-year-old dad. He wanted to know when Mitch Seavey had arrived.

About two hours earlier, a volunteer told him.

“Yeah, he’s going to crush it, man,” replied the 30-year-old Seavey, who arrived second to the checkpoint 77 miles from Nome. “He’s way into new record territory, isn’t he?”‘

It appears that he is.

By Tuesday morning, two-time Iditarod champion Mitch Seavey seemed just about untouchable. Anything can happen in the final miles to Nome, but Mitch and his team have had speed on their side for much of this year’s race.

As he reached this checkpoint and prepared for a mandatory eight-hour rest, his team remained ready to race, he said.

“I don’t think it could be any better. I’m here with some kind of lead anyway and a nice, fast team,” Mitch said as he waited for cold water from the river to warm so he could feed his 12-dog team in the subzero cold. “I don’t think I could complain about anything.”

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https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventure/iditarod/2017/03/14/poised-for-a-3rd-iditarod-victory-mitch-seavey-says-i-dont-think-i-could-complain-about-anything/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Alaska: Lead pack of Iditarod mushers heads for the coast

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March 12, 2017

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As the sun rose over western Alaska Sunday morning a freight train of mushers was bouncing over the Kaltag Portage enroute to Unalakleet, trying to sort out the top spots in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Just two hours, 10 minutes separated the top five racers — and they were on equal footing, having all completed both their 24-hour and eight-hour mandatory rests.

The top two were Seaveys, something Iditarod fans are becoming accustomed to, with Mitch out at 4:40 a.m. and son Dallas just five minutes behind. Then came 26-year-old Wade Marrs of Willow at 5:28 a.m., with Nicolas Petit of Girdwood following about an hour later. Norwegian musher Joar Ulsom was 15 minutes behind Petit.

Aliy Zirkle of Two Rivers, a three-time runner up in the 1,000-mile race to Nome, was sixth.

https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventure/iditarod/2017/03/12/lead-pack-of-iditarod-mushers-head-for-the-coast/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Alaska Iditarod: Canine athletes: Meet 10 of the Iditarod dogs racing to Nome

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  • Author:
  • March 11, 2017
  • Updated: 56 minutes ago
  • Published 5 hours ago

GALENA — Ask Iditarod mushers about their sled dog teams, and they’ll tell you each canine is a little bit different. Some friendly, some ornery and some a little bit bossy.

Hundreds of sled dogs are racing through Interior Alaska right now, on their way to the Norton Sound coast, as part of their 1,000-mile journey to Nome.

Meet 10 of the pups racing this year’s Iditarod:

Go to:

https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventure/iditarod/2017/03/11/canine-athletes-meet-10-of-the-iditarod-dogs-racing-to-nome/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Frostbitten hands, chilled feet from Iditarod cold snap test mushers’ resolve

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  • Author:

  • Updated: 2 hours ago

  • Published 17 hours ago

TANANA — When Iditarod musher Joe Carson peeled off his gloves, pieces of his frozen skin stuck to the fabric.

He held out his right hand outside at the checkpoint here early Wednesday morning. Temperatures hovered around 30 degrees below zero. His dogs slept on top of straw and underneath red-and-green fleece blankets. A layer of frost coated his hat, neck warmer and sled. Two of his fingers were missing slices of skin, revealing red, raw sores underneath.

“The skin is frozen inside of that glove. It froze there,” said the fourth-generation Alaskan who lives in McGrath and who pulled into Tanana at 6:46 a.m. Wednesday.

Overnight, temperatures remained far below zero in town and were lower along the trail.

55 below

While traveling on the Tanana River, Carson said his thermometer read 55 below. He kept water bottles tucked inside of his insulated coveralls to keep them from freezing and to stay hydrated. He kept his sled dog team in jackets and fed them fat along the trail — chicken fat, beaver fat, beef fat and tripe.

“We were going to camp, but it was just too cold,” said Carson, a 60-year-old Iditarod rookie. “I’ve got my thermometer on my sled and I’m looking at it going, ‘Oh, baby.’ “

While the front-runners raced out of Tanana before dawn Wednesday, Carson and more than a dozen other mushers remained in town by late morning. They fed their sled dogs in a snowy lot next to the community hall, periodically going inside to eat, warm up or try to nap.

To get to the community of about 240 at the confluence of the Tanana and Yukon rivers, all of the teams had to push through the deep chill and a thick ice fog, just as Carson did.

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https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventure/iditarod/2017/03/08/frostbitten-hands-chilled-feet-from-iditarod-cold-snap-tests-mushers-resolve/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

 

 

 

 

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Alaska: Iditarod sled dog race — day 3

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Iditarod live blog: Dallas Seavey, Wade Marrs trade the lead on the Yukon River

It’s day three of Iditarod 45, and guess what? It’s looking like a game of leapfrog.

Defending champion Dallas Seavey led a pack of mushers down the Yukon River toward the checkpoint of Ruby overnight but was trailed closely by last year’s fourth-place finisher, Wade Marrs. They appear to be running neck and neck, with trackers showing them flip-flopping the lead, depending on when the trackers update.

They were followed by a contingent of top contenders Wednesday morning, including two-time champion Mitch Seavey, Kuskokwim 300 champ Pete Kaiser and 2013 Iditarod Rookie of the Year Joar Leifseth Ulsom.

It looks like mushers were contending with another frigid morning, with temps in Tanana and Ruby hovering around minus 30. It will make for some cold camping as mushers run the 119 miles to Ruby, the longest stretch of trail between checkpoints.

Expect mushers to stop and rest their teams at least once or even twice as they make their way down the Yukon.

— Suzanna Caldwell 

https://www.adn.com/sports/2017/03/08/iditarod-live-blog-dallas-seavey-wade-marrs-in-the-lead-down-the-yukon-river/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Must watch video exposing corruption in

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MUST WATCH HYSTERICAL Super Bowl Ad Blasts Humane Society of the United States

http://whoradio.iheart.com/onair/simon-conway-42296/must-watch-hysterical-super-bowl-ad-15530098/#.WJPLnbwdN74.facebook#ixzz4XkKye0TG

It has been learned that many non-profit national-type of groups really don’t use the donated money for what advertising claims. Humane Society of the United States is one of the worst, despite its very sad heart-rendering commercials. — Editor Liz Bowen

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APNewsBreak: Ringling Bros. circus to close after 146 years

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PNP comment: Things change. Time marches on. But, this is a sad one. — Editor Liz Bowen

U.S. News and World Report

The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will end ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ in May, following a 146-year run

Jan. 14, 2017, at 11:51 p.m.

 

By TAMARA LUSH, Associated Press

ELLENTON, Fla. (AP) — After 146 years, the curtain is coming down on “The Greatest Show on Earth.” The owner of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus told The Associated Press that the show will close forever in May.

The iconic American spectacle was felled by a variety of factors, company executives say. Declining attendance combined with high operating costs, along with changing public tastes and prolonged battles with animal rights groups all contributed to its demise.

“There isn’t any one thing,” said Kenneth Feld, chairman and CEO of Feld Entertainment. “This has been a very difficult decision for me and for the entire family.”

The company broke the news to circus employees Saturday night after shows in Orlando and Miami.

Ringling Bros. has two touring circuses this season and will perform 30 shows between now and May. Major stops include Atlanta, Washington, Philadelphia, Boston and Brooklyn. The final shows will be in Providence, Rhode Island, on May 7 and in Uniondale, New York, at the Nassau County Coliseum on May 21.

The circus, with its exotic animals, flashy costumes and death-defying acrobats, has been a staple of entertainment in the United States since the mid-1800s. Phineas Taylor Barnum made a traveling spectacle of animals and human oddities popular, while the five Ringling brothers performed juggling acts and skits from their home base in Wisconsin. Eventually, they merged and the modern circus was born. The sprawling troupes traveled around America by train, wowing audiences with the sheer scale of entertainment and exotic animals.

By midcentury, the circus was routine, wholesome family entertainment. But as the 20th century went on, kids became less and less enthralled. Movies, television, video games and the internet captured young minds. The circus didn’t have savvy product merchandising tie-ins or Saturday morning cartoons to shore up its image.

“The competitor in many ways is time,” said Feld, adding that transporting the show by rail and other circus quirks — such as providing a traveling school for performers’ children— are throwbacks to another era. “It’s a different model that we can’t see how it works in today’s world to justify and maintain an affordable ticket price. So you’ve got all these things working against it.”

The Feld family bought the Ringling circus in 1967. The show was just under 3 hours then. Today, the show is 2 hours and 7 minutes, with the longest segment — a tiger act — clocking in at 12 minutes.

“Try getting a 3- or 4-year-old today to sit for 12 minutes,” he said.

Feld and his daughter Juliette Feld, who is the company’s chief operating officer, acknowledged another reality that led to the closing, and it was the one thing that initially drew millions to the show: the animals. Ringling has been targeted by activists who say forcing animals to perform is cruel and unnecessary.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, a longtime opponent of the circus, wasted no time in claiming victory.

“After 36 years of PETA protests, which have awoken the world to the plight of animals in captivity, PETA heralds the end of what has been the saddest show on earth for wild animals, and asks all other animal circuses to follow suit, as this is a sign of changing times,” Ingrid Newkirk, president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, wrote in a statement.

Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States, acknowledged the move was “bittersweet” for the Felds but said: “I applaud their decision to move away from an institution grounded on inherently inhumane wild animal acts.”

 In May of 2016, after a long and costly legal battle, the company removed the elephants from the shows and sent the animals to live on a conservation farm in Central Florida. The animals had been the symbol of the circus since Barnum brought an Asian elephant named Jumbo to America in 1882. In 2014, Feld Entertainment won $25.2 million in settlements from groups including the Humane Society of the United States, ending a 14-year fight over allegations that circus employees mistreated elephants.

By the time the elephants were removed, public opinion had shifted somewhat. Los Angeles prohibited the use of bull-hooks by elephant trainers and handlers, as did Oakland, California. The city of Asheville, North Carolina nixed wild or exotic animals from performing in the municipally owned, 7,600-seat U.S. Cellular Center.

Attendance has been dropping for 10 years, said Juliette Feld, but when the elephants left, there was a “dramatic drop” in ticket sales. Paradoxically, while many said they didn’t want big animals to perform in circuses, many others refused to attend a circus without them.

“We know now that one of the major reasons people came to Ringling Bros. was getting to see elephants,” she said. “We stand by that decision. We know it was the right decision. This was what audiences wanted to see and it definitely played a major role.”

The Felds say their existing animals — lions, tigers, camels, donkeys, alpacas, kangaroos and llamas — will go to suitable homes. Juliette Feld says the company will continue operating the Center for Elephant Conservation.

 Some 500 people perform and work on both touring shows. A handful will be placed in positions with the company’s other, profitable shows — it owns Monster Jam, Disney on Ice and Marvel Live, among other things — but most will be out of a job. Juliette Feld said the company will help employees with job placement and resumes. In some cases where a circus employee lives on the tour rail car (the circus travels by train), the company will also help with housing relocation.

Kenneth Feld became visibly emotional while discussing the decision with a reporter. He said over the next four months, fans will be able to say goodbye at the remaining shows.

In recent years, Ringling Bros. tried to remain relevant, hiring its first African American ringmaster, then its first female ringmaster, and also launching an interactive app. It added elements from its other, popular shows, such as motorbike daredevils and ice skaters. But it seemingly was no match for Pokemon Go and a generation of kids who desire familiar brands and YouTube celebrities.

“We tried all these different things to see what would work, and supported it with a lot of funding as well, and we weren’t successful in finding the solution,” said Kenneth Feld.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

THERE is more to the article:

http://www.usnews.com/news/us/articles/2017-01-14/apnewsbreak-ringling-bros-circus-to-close-after-146-years

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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“God Bless The USA” Singer To Perform At Concert For Trump’s Inauguration

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PNP comment:  Hooray for Lee Greenwood! — Editor Liz Bowen

 

Breitbart.com

By Christine Rousselle

Posted: Jan 13, 2017 10:55 AM

“God Bless The USA” singer Lee Greenwood is set to perform at the “Make America Great Again!” welcome concert on January 19, the eve of the inauguration.

Other acts for the concert will be announced a later date.

During the primaries, Greenwood appeared and sang at a Marco Rubio rally.

So far, there have been three other confirmed acts at the inauguration. Jackie Evancho will sing The Star-Spangled Banner, and the Rockettes and Mormon Tabernacle Choir will also perform.

http://townhall.com/tipsheet/christinerousselle/2017/01/13/god-bless-the-usa-singer-to-perform-at-concert-for-trumps-inauguration-n2271079

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Christmas I remember best: My worst Christmas was one of my best

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By Ray Palmer and Tricia Fuhriman

For the Deseret News

Editor’s note: As told to Ray Palmer’s granddaughter, Tricia Fuhriman

Christmas of 1945 started out as one of my worst. In retrospect, I am grateful for the lessons I learned, and it has become one of my best.

March of that year I departed America as a Marine aboard a naval transport ship assigned as a Japanese code intercept operator. I left behind my pregnant young wife and toddler son. Just as most of the world was experiencing, my life was uncertain and torn apart. I felt pride for my cause and righteous indignation for the great enemy — the Japanese.

After spending a few months in the South Pacific islands, our ships headed to Japan. On Aug. 6, 1945, the first atomic bomb was dropped, followed a short three days later by the second. Our mission that started out with the intent of invasion turned to occupation. Our fleet arrived at Japan’s Sasebo Bay in September. The next few months, we labored tracking down the remainder of the entrenched Japanese forces.

News from home was slow to arrive. The due date for my new baby had come and gone. It was six weeks after her birth that the happy news finally came, I had a new baby girl. She and mother were doing well. Being separated from my family was difficult. My conditions were uncomfortable and I still had a great amount of frustration toward the Japanese.

Christmas Day arrived. It was chilly, cold and desolate in Nagasaki. It was time for the greatly anticipated Christmas feast. My division headed off to the mess hall with visions of turkey, gravy and mashed potatoes. Much to our dismay they had run out of food! We were handed more K-rations instead. I felt hard-pressed to be so neglected on Christmas.

To our relief, high command became aware of our circumstances. Additional food was gathered and prepared. Later that evening, we returned to the mess hall. This time there was the scent of juicy turkey, rolls, gravy and all that made it feel like Christmas.

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After eating our fill we began to file out, back into the cold and dark. As we went to dump our food trays in the bins, we were met with the hollow but anxious eyes of several Japanese citizens, including children. They were dirty, poorly dressed (most without anything to cover their bare feet). They tentatively and humbly collected what scraps of bones or potatoes they could, in an effort to sustain life.

These poor people were not the great enemy I had come to fight. They were a beaten, destitute and hungry people. I had pitied my situation without realizing how truly blessed I actually was. I was separated from my loved ones, but I knew they were safe and secure and had the necessities of life. I knew we would be reunited. My current situation was not ideal but, I had three meals a day, a warm dry bed and security. I knew a great future lay ahead of me.

The realization of the immense suffering of these people humbled me and changed my outlook on life. A calm came with realizing these people were not my enemy but fellow human beings with families and heartaches. The feelings of fear and hatred were replaced with love and compassion. Under the direction of great American leaders, the soldiers rallied to help rebuild the Japanese communities and ease the suffering as much as possible.

Every Christmas I take a moment to ponder on this experience. The memory of what I learned becomes dearer to me each year. The Christmas of 1945 has become one that has meant the most in my life.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865669813/Christmas-I-remember-best-My-worst-Christmas-was-one-of-my-best.html

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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