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California’s next presidential primary — in 2020 — will be earlier

CA & OR, Elections

SacBee.com

Capital Alert

September 27, 2017 2:01 PM

California will hold its 2020 presidential primary in March rather than late in the process in June, under state legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday.

Brown did not issue remarks with his signature, but proponents said their chief motivation was to make California – long a source of campaign donations – more relevant in the nominating process.

“Candidates will not be able to ignore the largest, most diverse state in the nation as they seek our country’s highest office,” Secretary of State Alex Padilla, a Democrat, said Wednesday. Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens and the author of Senate Bill 568, predicted the so-called “prime time primary” would change elections here for the better.“We have a responsibility to drive a different agenda at the national level and promote inclusion and consensus, not the politics of division,” he added in a swipe at President Donald Trump.

Among the potential beneficiaries of the earlier primary are U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, rising Democratic stars who are often discussed as possible presidential candidates. U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders has been active in the state early.

An analysis by Paul Mitchell, a consultant and elections expert with Political Data Inc., found that under the current delegate count and schedule, California would account for 37 percent of the elected delegates on Super Tuesday, and 33 percent of all delegates elected to that point.

Even if the national party penalizes California for going early by stripping 70 delegates, the state would still have 32 percent of the delegates awarded on Super Tuesday, and 28 percent of all the delegates awarded by that point in the process.

California last sought to correct its lack of impact in the primaries by shifting its vote to February in 2008.

Hillary Clinton beat Barack Obama in California, but he outlasted Clinton by peeling off a string of states. Still, it helped boost turnout among registered voters here to nearly 58 percent.

Presidential primaries were in March in 2000 (54 percent turnout) and 1996 (42 percent). California shared its March 2004 primary with nine states (44 percent), but lawmakers complained about the protracted election season and pushed it back to June.

Critics of the process point to a handful of factors that could lessen the state’s 2020 impact: Delegates are awarded proportionally based on a candidate’s performance.

Also, other states could move up their primaries. More than 20 states ultimately shared their primary day with California in 2008, the earliest date allowed by the Democratic Party without special exception.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article175743741.html?#emlnl=Alerts_Newsletter#storylink=cpy

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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LA County Admits Number Of Registered Voters At 144% Of Resident Citizens Of Voting Age

CA & OR, Elections, State gov

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-05/california-has-11-counties-more-registered-voters-voting-age-citizens

PNP comment: This is a very interesting read! — Editor Liz Bowen

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President Kamala Harris? She’s making the first moves

Elections, Politicians & agencies

PNP comment: If this happens, rural America will have an even tougher go! — Editor Liz Bowen

Sac Bee.com

May 9, 2017

Now’s the time prospective presidential candidates start taking the subtle but crucial behind-the-scenes steps that get them noticed by the political intelligentsia, and Sen. Kamala Harris is quietly following the script.

She’s making speeches to key national constituencies. She’s due for an appearance at a Washington think-tank panel full of chattering-class presidential favorites that the national media will be reporting and analyzing, probably for days. She’s been fundraising for colleagues and making sure that she is forming relationships with key national reporters.

They’re all boxes that prospective presidential candidates routinely check. It’s a chance to ultimately convince insiders they’ve got the gravitas and the fundraising chops to be taken seriously. The California Democrat, sworn into office four months ago, insists she’s not thinking about a run for president. Her inner circle forcefully tries to tamp down 2020 speculation – after all, there is no upside to being seen as a new senator focused more on national political ambition than on California.

But the speculation is not going away, not with the absence of a clear Democratic presidential frontrunner and the party desperately in search and in need of a new generation of leadership.

“A lot of activists in the party would love to see a new leader step forward,” said Roger Hickey,” co-director of the progressive strategy group Campaign for America’s Future.

Harris is being closely watched.

“Looking forward to see how she performs as a senator, I think that the sky is the limit for her,” said Jaime Harrison, associate chairman and counselor of the Democratic National Committee.

So far, Harris has leaped into the political spotlight with a resume that screams potential presidential material. She’s 52, a generation younger than better-known favorites such as Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts or former Vice President Joe Biden.

“From everything I’ve seen of her she’d be an attractive candidate, she could be a compelling candidate, and I think she’d have a lot of appeal for primary voters,” said Bob Shrum, a senior adviser to the presidential campaigns of Al Gore and John Kerry.

A strong block of liberal Democrats, though, would eagerly embrace another Sanders run. And Shrum said Democrats would rally around a Biden presidential candidacy but, if the 74-year-old Biden doesn’t run, and he has said that he will not, “there’s a deep desire in the Democratic Party to move on to a new generation.”

What every new presidential hopeful needs is an early defining moment.

President Barack Obama’s was his 2004 keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention. Harris’ was her energetic performance in a prominent speaking role at the Women’s March on Washington, a rally that attracted worldwide attention and had an estimated crowd of a half a million people. She instantly became a favorite of liberals, and followed that with remarks at an immigration rally at the White House and a podcast with former top Obama adviser David Axlerod, the architect of Obama’s out-of-nowhere 2008 campaign.

Harris’ rollout accelerates this month. She was the keynote speaker at last week’s National Democratic Institute’s Madeleine Albright luncheon, a prominent Washington event hosted by the nonprofit, nonpartisan group. She’ll give the May 13 commencement speech at Howard University in Washington, her alma mater.

Days later she’ll join a host of others floated as presidential wannabes, including Warren, Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York in a speaking role at the Ideas Conference, a Washington gathering seen as the liberal equivalent of the Conservative Public Action Conference, a traditional testing ground of GOP presidential hopefuls.

Harris is building relationships in the party. She’s done fundraising emails for fellow senators Warren, Gillibrand and Sherrod Brown of Ohio.

It’s the sort of quiet bridge-building that ultimately paid off for Obama, Jimmy Carter, George W. Bush and many others years before they were elected.

Read more here:

http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/article149309469.html#storylink=cpy

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Pence breaks Senate tie to confirm DeVos as U.S. education secretary

Elections, President Trump and officials

 

PNP comment:  This is a leftist-biased article as it does not give the reasons, why she should receive the position — only the opposition. — Editor Liz Bowen

 

  • Author: Emma Brown,

  • The Washington Post

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump’s choice of billionaire Betsy DeVos to be education secretary was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, but only after Vice President Mike Pence was called in to break a tie that threatened to defeat her.

The tie-breaking vote, which Senate officials said was unprecedented to confirm a president’s Cabinet nominee, came after two Republicans joined with 46 Democrats and two independents in opposition to DeVos. Critics have called her unprepared to lead the Department of Education.

https://www.adn.com/nation-world/2017/02/07/devos-confirmation-for-education-secretary-expected-to-be-narrowest-vote-ever-for-a-cabinet-nominee/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Hayward: Trump’s ‘Nationalist’ Outreach–‘Black or Brown or White, We All Bleed the Same Red Blood of Patriots’

Elections

Breitbart.com

by John Hayward

21 Jan 2017

The great debate over what “nationalism” means will surely be filled by the closing passage of President Donald Trump’s inaugural speech:

A new national pride will stir ourselves, lift our sights and heal our divisions. It’s time to remember that old wisdom our soldiers will never forget, that whether we are black or brown or white, we all bleed the same red blood of patriots.

We all enjoy the same glorious freedoms and we all salute the same great American flag.

And whether a child is born in the urban sprawl of Detroit or the windswept plains of Nebraska, they look up at the same night sky, they fill their heart with the same dreams and they are infused with the breath of life by the same almighty creator.

So to all Americans in every city near and far, small and large, from mountain to mountain, from ocean to ocean, hear these words: You will never be ignored again. Your voice, your hopes and your dreams will define our American destiny. And your courage and goodness and love will forever guide us along the way.

Together we will make America strong again, we will make America wealthy again, we will make America proud again, we will make America safe again.

And, yes, together we will make America great again.

MORE

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/01/21/trumps-nationalist-outreach-black-brown-white-bleed-red-blood-patriots/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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President Trump Declares Independence

Elections

Wall Street Journal

Washington

His message to America: Remember those things I said in the campaign? I meant them. I meant it all.

I was more moved than I expected. Then more startled.

The old forms and traditions, the bands and bunting, endured. I thought, as I watched the inauguration: It continues. There were pomp and splendor, happy, cheering crowds; and for all the confounding nature of the past 18 months, and all the trauma, it came as a reassurance to see us do what we do the way we do it. A friend in the Southwest, a longtime Trump supporter, emailed just before the swearing in: “I have been crying all morning.” From joy.

I found myself unexpectedly moved during the White House meeting of the Trumps and the Obamas, at the moment Melania Trump emerged from her car. She was beautiful, seemed so shy and game. There are many ways to show your respect for people and events, and one is to present yourself with elegance and dignity.

The inaugural address was utterly and uncompromisingly Trumpian. The man who ran is the man who’ll reign. It was plain, unfancy and blunt to the point of blistering. A little humility would have gone a long way, but that’s not the path he took. Nor did he attempt to reassure. It was pow, right in the face. Most important, he did not in any way align himself with the proud Democrats and Republicans arrayed around him. He looked out at the crowd and said he was allied with them.

He presented himself not as a Republican or a conservative but as a populist independent. The essential message: Remember those things I said in the campaign? I meant them. I meant it all.

The address was bold in its assertion of the distance in America between the leaders and the led: “For too long, a small group in our nation’s capital has reaped the rewards of government while the people have borne the cost. Washington flourished—but the people did not share in its wealth. Politicians prospered—but the jobs left, and the factories closed. The establishment protected itself but not the citizens of our country.”

It was an unmistakable indictment of almost everyone seated with him on the platform.

Then a stark vow: “That all changes—starting right here and right now.” Jan. 20 “will be remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again.”

And these words were most remarkable, not because they were new, but because he didn’t back away from them, he repeated them in an improvisation: “From this day forward it’s going to be only America first—America first.” To American workers and families: “You will never be ignored again.”

The speech will electrify President Trump’s followers. They will feel satisfaction that they understood him and knew what they were backing. And it will deepen the Washington establishment’s unease. Republican leaders had been hoping the address would ameliorate their anxieties about the continued primacy of their traditional policy preferences. Forget that. This was a declaration that the president is going his own way and they’d best follow.

Throughout the speech, and much of the day, Mr. Trump looked stern. At first I thought it was the face he puts on when he’s nervous. I don’t think so now.

Anyway, it was a remarkable speech, like none before it, and it marked, I think, yet another break point in the two-party reality that has dominated our politics for many decades.

And so, now, it begins. And it simply has to be repeated: We have never had a political moment like this in our lives. We have never had a president like this, such a norm-breaker, in all the ways we know. We are in uncharted seas.

His supporters, who flooded Washington this week, were friendly, courteous—but watchful. Two Midwestern women told me separately that they used to be but no longer are Republican. They’re something new, waiting for a name.

MUCH MORE

http://www.wsj.com/articles/president-trump-declares-independence-1484956174

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Gov. Brown Appoints Radical Enviro Justice Activists to Public Utilities Commission

CA & OR, Elections, State gov

Flash Report.org

Posted by at 1:03 am on Jan 04, 2017

Wednesday, January 04, 2017 1:03 AM

Governor Jerry Brown has just appointed two radical environmental justice activists to the California Public Utilities Commission, replacing two commissioners whose terms expired January 1, 2017.

Awaiting Senate confirmation, are Clifford Rechtschaffen and Martha Guzman Aceves — two Brown insiders with shady records and a history of Environmental Justice. They aren’t unknown; bothGuzman Aceves andRechtschaffen have been exposed prominently in articles on this news site, and several others (links below).

Don’t let the term “Environmental Justice” fool you. This “justice” is not about protecting poor and low income communities from excess pollutants or toxic materials; it is about environmental extremists’ scheme to spread wealth through government mandates. Remember President Obama’s… Read More

http://www.flashreport.org/blog/2017/01/04/gov-brown-appoints-radical-enviro-justice-activists-to-public-utilities-commission/

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

 

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Oregon Grant County Sheriff: Palmer Wins Election Despite the Media Narrative

Elections, Sheriffs

Does Les Zaitz have a personal crusade against Sheriff Palmer?

Redoubt News.com

by Shari Dovale

Sheriff Glenn Palmer of Grant County Oregon came under fire during the Malheur Protest in January 2016 because he talked to some men that were involved in the protest.

There you go, the evil wicked deeds of this Sheriff are exposed!

It is common knowledge that Palmer supports the Constitution of the United States and is well regarded in his county. However, the main stream media has made continuous attacks on him and his character in their attempts to thwart his reelection campaign.

It didn’t work. Palmer won his bid for a 5th term in office.

But the attacks continue.

In particular, the Oregonian and their reporter, Les Zaitz, have been focused on Sheriff Palmer and seemed to lead the charge to discredit him.

Just beginning with the Refuge Protest and since, they have systematically accused him, tried to bury him in paperwork, sued him, publicly ridiculed him, and now are trying to bankrupt him.

Les Zaitz specifically seemed to be on a crusade to discredit Palmer. Most of the articles were written by him and include innuendo and supposition. While the public’s need to know is great, the journalist has a responsibility to show both sides of the issue and focus on the truth.

# # #

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

Palmer Wins Election Despite the Media Narrative

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Quincy native tasked by Trump administration to tap into pulse of rural America

Agriculture, Elections

PNP comment: For President-elect to recognize there is a rural American is huge! HUGE!!! — Editor Liz Bowen

By Herald-Whig

Posted: Nov. 21, 2016 8:50 am

PAYSON, Ill. — A Seymour High School graduate has been named to President-elect Donald Trump’s Agricultural Advisory Committee.

Trent Loos, a sixth-generation farmer, hopes to better inform Trump’s administration of the outlook of rural America.

“The working class members of this country need to be heard,” Loos said. “Nov. 8 was the day the work began, not when it ended.”

The committee was formed, Loos said, with the intent of conveying public sentiment to help direct policy within the new administration. The Trump administration asked Gary Baise, a well-known Illinois farmer and attorney, to find farmers who are “the real men of the land,” Loos said. Baise recommended Loos, who now lives in Nebraska and regularly speaks in 35 states and four different countries, for the committee.

“I felt quite honored to be asked to have input on the direction of this country,” Loos said. “We live in a representative republic, and as citizens of this country, the people representing us need to hear what we have to say.”

His qualification, Loos feels, comes from his extensive speaking history and the intimate connections he has made with everyday people across America. He described the new responsibility as “to make sure they know what the people in this country are thinking and wanting.”

“We are the eyes and ears on the ground,” Loos said.

Sixty members from diverse backgrounds comprise the committee, establishing, as Loos said, “a cross-section of people from every part of this country.”

One issue on which Loos hopes to enact major change is the filling of agricultural production jobs.

“We need to take a stand,” Loos said. “We need to think about who is going to do the tasks that make this country great.”

Loos noted a large demographic of the country has been overlooked by previous administrations.

“I think that’s why we had so much of rural America stand up and vote for Trump,” Loos said. “We are not happy with the status quo.”

Immediately after the election, he began receiving phone calls and emails from somewhat-fearful Australian, Irish and Canadian agricultural media outlets.

“They were concerned that he is not going to do any trade with other countries, but they were not getting the whole story,” Loos said. “To think the Trump administration is opposed to trade is just misguided.

http://www.whig.com/20161121/quincy-native-tasked-by-trump-administration-to-tap-into-pulse-of-rural-america

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Wyoming county sees 100 percent voter turnout

Elections

Voter turnout last week reached a historic high in one Wyoming county – where 100 percent of registered voters cast a ballot in the general election.

“I think everyone was wanting to get out and vote and voice their opinion,” said Jane Carr, deputy county clerk in Johnson County, Wyo. “I just think it’s great.”

Technically, Johnson County saw a turnout above 100 percent – there were 4,402 registered voters going into Election Day, and 4,485 people cast a vote, thanks to Wyoming’s same-day registration laws.

Carr said she could tell there was an extra excitement about this election because many people cast absentee ballots in the weeks leading up to it, including those who registered and voted at the same time.

Extraordinary voter turnout is the norm in Johnson County, though this year was higher than usual. County Clerk Vicki Edelman said during her six years on the job, she’s seen upwards of 92 and 93 percent turnout.

Edelman also pointed to her county’s election participation as an example, amid anti-Donald Trump protests involving some who reportedly did not vote last week.

“They really can’t complain if they did not participate in the voting. I would think they wouldn’t feel like they should complain,” said Edelman. “And from what I’m hearing on the news, a lot of those protesters did not vote.”

Johnson County, like the state of Wyoming, is heavily Republican. More than 77 percent of the vote last week went to Trump; in the local House race, 70 percent went to Liz Cheney, former Vice President Dick Cheney’s daughter. All the state legislator and county commissioner positions went to Republicans.

“It is very exciting and is an indication of the frustration and anger in Wyoming,” said state Sen. Dave Kinskey. “Especially rural Wyoming, with the hostility of the Obama administration and its war on agriculture and war on coal.”

U.S. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., said he was “proud—but not surprised—by the overwhelming voter turnout in Johnson County.”

Johnson County has a population of just over 8,600 people, according to the local chamber of commerce. It sits just east of the Big Horn Mountains, and is known for its hunting, fishing, camping and mountain-climbing.

The state of Wyoming as a whole also set a voter turnout record, according to the secretary of state’s office.

Economic factors could be at play. The state’s economy runs on minerals, oil, gas and coal – but has been in a downturn for the last two years between oil prices falling below 30 dollars a barrel and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell putting a stop to new coal leases while the department reviews the federal coal program. Residents had concerns that if Hillary Clinton were elected president, many of the struggles facing the mineral industry would continue.

Ray Bogan is a Fox News multimedia reporter based in El Paso, Texas. Follow him on twitter: @RayBogan

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2016/11/15/wyoming-county-sees-100-percent-voter-turnout.html

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

 

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