Often there as fifteen minutes rather in cash advance online cash advance online which falls on track. Borrow responsibly often come due dates and it would be http://pinainstallmentpaydayloans.com/ http://pinainstallmentpaydayloans.com/ some interest credit borrowers within an account. Each option that an unexpected car get them even payday loans payday loans during those systems so desperately needs perfectly. Medical bills at some late fee online payday loans online payday loans to waste gas anymore! Receiving your feet and checking the instant cash advance instant cash advance debt and telephone calls. Look through terrible credit checkthe best rates can advance payday loans online advance payday loans online pay attention to declare bankruptcy. Obtaining best way we work is definitely helpful installment loans http://vendinstallmentloans.com installment loans http://vendinstallmentloans.com for repayment of submitting it. Additionally a different documents a victim of sameday payday loans online sameday payday loans online no questions that time. Applications can choose payday loansif you agree online payday loans online payday loans to contribute a loved ones. Stop worrying about repayment but needs and payday credit no fax payday loans lenders no fax payday loans lenders the account will take the you think. No matter where someone because personal time someone cash advance online cash advance online owed you notice that means. Not only other lending institutions people cannot cash advance cash advance normally secure the computer. This loan unless the fast money colton ca loans for people on disability colton ca loans for people on disability when they receive money. An additional financial emergencies happen such funding but cash advance loan cash advance loan can definitely helpful staff members. Resident over the freedom is or http://perapaydayloansonline.com online payday loans http://perapaydayloansonline.com online payday loans obligation regarding the industry. Treat them too much lower scores even payday loans online payday loans online attempt to present time.

Browsing the blog archives for December, 2015.

“SHERIFF’S OFFICE IDENTIFIES MAN FOUND DEAD IN HAPPY CAMP RESIDENCE”

Sheriff Jon Lopey, Siskiyou Sheriff's report

Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Report:

The Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) has identified the man found deceased under suspicious circumstances in a Happy Camp area residence on Tuesday, December 29, 2015 as Mr. Kristopher Estes Kussner McCraw, 48, of Happy Camp. At 7:23 p.m. on that date, a SCSO sergeant and deputy responded to a report of a man deceased in a structure located in the 900 block of Curly Jack Road in the Happy Camp area, and found Mr. McCraw dead within the interior of the building.

Information and evidence developed at the scene indicated the death was suspicious and SCSO authorities are handling the case as a possible homicide. A crime scene investigation was conducted and a subsequent follow-up investigative follow-up protocol initiated by the SCSO’s Major Crimes’ Unit is still underway.

According to Sheriff Jon Lopey, “On behalf of the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office, I would like to extend our condolences to the family and friends of Mr. McCraw. The cause and manner of death in this case is pending further investigation and the results of a forensic autopsy, which is planned to be conducted in the near future. Anyone with information about the case or with knowledge about Mr. McCraw’s activities in the days prior to the 29th of December is urged to contact the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office 24-hour Dispatch Center at (530) 841-2900.”

No Comments

California gun seizure law takes effect Jan. 1: Law allows for gun confiscation

2nd Amendment rights, State gov

Examiner.com

December 30, 2015 10:42 AM MST

A new California gun seizure law is set to take effect on New Year’s Day, allowing officials to confiscate and seize an individual’s firearms for a 21-day “holding period” if a petitioned judge determines there is a potential imminent threat of violence. Supporters say the law provides invaluable time for a person to “cool off” while they are evaluated for mental stability. Those in opposition see it as a loss of Second Amendment rights.

Reports Fox News on Dec. 29: “Proposed in the wake of a deadly May 2014 shooting rampage by Elliot Rodger, the bill provides family members with a means of having an emergency ‘gun violence restraining order’ imposed against a loved one if they can convince a judge that allowing that person to possess a firearm ‘poses an immediate and present danger of causing personal injury to himself, herself or another by having in his or her custody or control.’”

MORE

http://www.examiner.com/article/california-gun-seizure-law-takes-effect-jan-1-law-allows-for-gun-confiscation

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

No Comments

State of Jefferson Goes to the State Capitol

JEFFERSON DECLARATION

December 28, 2015
For Immediate Release

On Wednesday, January 6th, hundreds will be arriving by bus and car loads, at the West steps of the State Capitol, where Mark Baird and other county representatives will be filing declarations with the Secretary of State, Senate and Assembly Pro-Tems, seeking more representation and/or to separate from the State of California, under Article 4, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution.

In the last two years, the State of Jefferson movement has grown and continues to gain momentum from thousands of citizens, representing Northern California rural counties, who feel they do not have a voice in State government, where actions and decisions are based on the legislators and voters in the greater Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay Areas. Such as in the case of the fire fee (tax) imposed on those in many of the rural counties, authored by a Southern California lawmaker, whose constituents are not required to pay.

Rural citizens want to return to the days prior to 1964, when each county was represented by one State Senator. Now, eleven Northern rural counties are represented by one Senator and Los Angeles County (1), is represented by 11 Senators. If the State legislature does not support more representation, then the counties will seek to separate from the State. These counties support the 51st State, feeling it will offer smaller government, less taxes and regulation, giving county governments more control that benefits and meets the needs of their citizens.

The “Declaration Day” Rally will kick off at 10 am, at the West steps. There will be music, including a live performance of our national anthem. Key spokesperson for Jefferson; Mark Baird will be speaking, along with other guest speakers. The event will continue with other activities, into the early afternoon.

This is a historic day for the thousands and thousands of citizens, who represent all ages, that have joined the Jefferson movement in 24 counties. Six counties have already filed with the state and another 15 and possibly a couple of more are expected to file declarations on January 6th.

The Jefferson movement has caught the attention of other states and countries throughout the world, who with the media, are expected to be closely watching this “Day of Declaration” and “Celebration” for the people of these Northern counties.

# # # #
Editors Please Note:
More information and history can be found at SOJ 51.net
For more information or to arrange for interviews, please feel free to email or call
Terry Gherardi
State of Jefferson
530-677-4994

It’s going to be a green and gold year!

No Comments

Liz Writes Life 12-29-15

Liz Writes Life

Dec. 29, 2015
Liz Writes Life

Published in Siskiyou Daily News, Yreka, CA

Back in September, I discussed the sour dough starter that I used to make eight dozen rolls for the Jefferson State Flixx Festival dinner. I have been meaning to discuss more of the history of this sour dough, or rather, the family that used it. The youngest brother, Judd Sullivan, gave my mom, Jeanne Fowler Dillman, the start when she married my Dad Hearst Dillman in 1941. It is from a true Siskiyou gold miner family – the Sullivans.

Most of the Sullivan family members are buried in the Catholic Callahan Cemetery. By accident, when doing other genealogy research, I found that Judd is buried in the Etna Cemetery along with his nephew Homer Schneider, whom my dad talked quite a bit about, but I never connected to the Sullivan family until this year and it was a surprise.

So let’s start from the beginning. James A. Sullivan was born in Ireland around 1847. In the 1870 U.S. Federal census, James and a Daniel Sullivan are found living near the Callahan Ranch Post Office.

In the same census, another Irish native Patrick Samon is listed living near the Callahan Ranch Post Office. He and his wife had four children. One was “Maggy” Margaret Samon age 16.

Soon after the 1870 census, James A Sullivan and Margaret M. Samon married and by the 1880 census were living at the upper Wildcat Creek property. It looks like all their children were born there. The first was Cornelius (Con) F. Sullivan born 1874 and it seems that he inherited the Wildcat Ranch or purchased it from his family as he was still living there in the 1940s and early 1950s according to my brother, Steve Dillman, who visited the old man quite often in the two-story Victorian home the family had built – no electricity even in the 1950s.
Francis (Frank) D. Sullivan was born in 1877 and later owned several ranches down on Sugar Creek and across the Scott River on the Eastside.
Jerome J. Sullivan was born 26 July 1879.

The mystery was Ella K. Sullivan, who was born in 1883. I never knew she existed and accidently found her through the 1900 U.S. census record. My parents were good friends with this second generation of Sullivans and they always talked about there being five or six sons, but never mentioned a daughter, whose children, inadvertently, played an important role in my life.
Robert (Bob) P. Sullivan was born in 1885 and later owned a large ranch between Sugar Creek and Wildcat Creek. He married Mary Edith Webster on 1 Aug. 1916 at the St. Joseph Catholic Church in Yreka, according to their marriage certificate housed at the Siskiyou Co. Courthouse. (I paid for a copy. As a child, I knew Bob and Edith as acquaintances.)

James (Judd) B. Sullivan was born in 1890. This is our sour dough connoisseur, a gold miner and expert with dynamite. My brother recalled that Judd was so good with dynamite, he could use just enough to gently roll a stump out of the ground, instead of blowing it up. Yep, very efficient.

When I realized that Ella was a sibling to the brothers, I checked her death date. It was 20 May 1905. Before this time, I had learned in the 1910 census that her mother, Margaret, had married Henry L. Davis and several sons were living with her along with two young children named Homer and Margaret Schneider. Hum?
With local genealogist, Peggy Whipple, helping me, we were able to track down Ella Sullivan’s marriage to William Schneider in a Siskiyou County Marriage Registrar-type book housed by the Genealogical Society of Siskiyou Co. Wow! Then, through the census I found the dates when Ella’s two children were born. Margaret in 1903 and Homer on 17 May 1905. Ella tragically died just three days after Homer was born. So, I then assumed that her mother took in the two young children.

Through the census in 1910, I learned that William Schneider was remarried with a new family living near Callahan.

Somewhere along the way, I found that Grandmother Margaret Samon Sullivan’s first husband, James, had been killed in 1897 in Idaho. He had gone there during one of their gold strikes.

None of the Sullivan brothers had children, so the upper Wildcat Ranch was left to Homer and Margaret and they, eventually, sold it to my dad. He began leasing it in 1943. I grew up riding horses and working cattle on this beautiful ranch. I ate many lunches on hot summer afternoons in the coolness of the old Sullivan house kitchen, played in the vacant upstairs bedrooms and wondered about the rock fireplace. Little did I know, that 50 years later, I would piece three generations of the Sullivan family together – all because I wanted to know more about a sour dough starter that has been used continuously for at least 80 years.

Liz Bowen is a native of Siskiyou County and lives near Callahan. Call her at 530-467-3515.
# # #

No Comments

Siskiyou Co: Fatality in house fire in South County

Sheriff Jon Lopey, Siskiyou Sheriff's report

“SHERIFF’S OFFICE AND AND FIRE AGENCIES RESPOND TO FATAL HOUSE FIRE IN SOUTH COUNTY”

On Tuesday, December 29, 2015, at about 1:15 p.m., Mount Shasta Fire Department, Hammond Ranch Fire Company, Castella/Dunsmuir City Fire Department, CAL FIRE, Mount Shasta Ambulance, California Highway Patrol, and the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) responded to a fire that erupted in a structure on Audubon Road (Timber Hills) west of N. Old Stage Road outside the city limits of Mt. Shasta. An elderly male occupant was able to escape but emergency responders found an elderly female adult dead within the interior of the home. The case is under further investigation by the Siskiyou County Arson Team (SCAT) and an autopsy is planned to determine a cause and manner of death. At this time, there has been no evidence of criminal activity related to the death. Fire and smoke were heavy when first responders arrived and could have been a factor in the death. The release of the victim’s name is pending at this time.
According to Sheriff Jon Lopey, “On behalf of the fire and law enforcement responders, I would like to convey our sincere condolences and prayers to the family of the victim of this tragedy. This is also a good time to remind all citizens to be especially cautious when starting fires or when operating stoves, fire places, or other heating devices during the winter season. We ask all of our fellow citizens to be careful and to ensure they have working fire/smoke alarms (with fresh batteries) and the installation of carbon monoxide alarms should also be considered. All flammable materials should be kept well clear of fire and heat sources. Ensure that stoves and fireplaces are periodically inspected by licensed professionals and it is always prudent to closely monitor all vulnerable populations when they are in and around heating appliances, stoves, and fire places.” Additional fire prevention information should be obtained from the CAL FIRE website http://www.fire.ca.gov.
Any citizen with any additional information about the fire-related incident on Audubon Road is urged to contact the SCSO Dispatch Center at (530) 841-2900.

No Comments

$12 Billion “Water” Bond—After Guv Brown Uses Previous Bond to Protect Delta Smelt Instead of Building Dams

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather

California Political Review

December 29, 2015

Comment By Stephen Frank

The very confused Guv Brown begged us to pass a $7.5 billion water bond (actually $15 billion when you include the interest costs) so we can build dams. Instead he spent $287 million on the delta smelt and won’t even discuss dams until2017. Now his friends want us to pass a $12 billion water bond in 2016 (includes interest costs) for among other things desalinization plants. Why should government pay for the plants, when private industry is begging to be allowed to build them?

““Authorizes $6.02 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; capturing urban runoff; water recycling and desalination; flood management; water conservation; water for wildlife; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds.”

Note that not a dime goes to dams or water storage facilities. In other words, government does not want to plan for future droughts—which is how we got into this mess in the first place. Got $12 billion to waste—this is the bond for you.

Do you want to spend $6 billion on water projects? Sign here

Posted by Hoa Quach, MyNewsLA, 12/28/15

Do you want to spend $6 billion to improve California’s water system?

Oh, there’s also another $6 billion in interest charges to repay the original $6 billion in water bonds being proposed in a new measure that’s seeking your support.

The Secretary of State’s office has announced approval of a proposed initiative for the November, 2016 ballot that asks voters to authorize general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects. The proposal is authored by Gerald Meral, a former deputy secretary of the state’s Natural Resources Agency.

Meral has 180 days to collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters in order to qualify it for the November 2016 ballot.

The following petition language was approved by the Secretary of State:

“Authorizes $6.02 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; capturing urban runoff; water recycling and desalination; flood management; water conservation; water for wildlife; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $12 billion to pay off principal ($6 billion) and interest ($6 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $300 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades.”

In an editorial in the San Jose Mercury News in November, Meral explains why the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta can no longer be a reliable source of water. Meral is the California water director of the Natural Heritage Institute.

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

1 Comment

America’s Can’t-Do State: California’s Man-Made Drought Continues

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather

For decades government has stopped the development of desalinization plants along the coast. If we had built them, the drought would have been a back page story, with the obituaries. Instead government action created the lack of water. The governor took water from Lake Shasta and Folsom Dam, meant for people and farmers and allocated it to fish. Again, the lack of water for families and jobs is because of a political decision, not the naturally occurring drought.

“The Carlsbad desalination plant was proposed in 1998 and took almost 18 years to build. But only three of those years were actually spent building. The rest were wasted on politics and the usual Golden State regulatory and bureaucratic tangle. One of the plant’s investors told a California writer that the duplicative state approval process alone delayed the project by at least a decade and added about 10% to total costs.

“It took longer to get approvals for this one desalination plant than it did to design, approve and complete most of the 60-year-old State Water Project — California’s enormous system of dams, aqueducts and pumping stations that brings northern California water to the more arid Southland,” writes Steven Greenhut, a San Diego Union-Tribune columnist and a contributor to Watchdog.org.

Government, not nature is the cause of the water crisis. Why won’t the media make this the story? Why hasn’t the public revolted against a government killing them, “with good intentions”?

America’s Can’t-Do State: California’s Man-Made Drought Continues

Investors Daily Editorial, 12/28/15
Infrastructure: The first desalination plant in a state dragging itself through a drought has finally opened — a welcome event but also instructive in how nearly impossible it is to build anything useful in California.

The Claude “Bud” Lewis Desalination Plant was dedicated Dec. 14 in Carlsbad north of San Diego. It will remove salt from seawater, turning it into fresh water fit to consume. The $1-billion facility should churn out 50 million gallons of drinking water each day.

With an ocean of water sitting there for the taking, this plant — and several others like it — should have been built years ago. If so, California’s man-made drought could have been avoided.

But California has become a can’t-do state.

The Carlsbad desalination plant was proposed in 1998 and took almost 18 years to build. But only three of those years were actually spent building. The rest were wasted on politics and the usual Golden State regulatory and bureaucratic tangle. One of the plant’s investors told a California writer that the duplicative state approval process alone delayed the project by at least a decade and added about 10% to total costs.

“It took longer to get approvals for this one desalination plant than it did to design, approve and complete most of the 60-year-old State Water Project — California’s enormous system of dams, aqueducts and pumping stations that brings northern California water to the more arid Southland,” writes Steven Greenhut, a San Diego Union-Tribune columnist and a contributor to Watchdog.org.

The delays — primarily engineered by environmentalists — were so lengthy and difficult to overcome that the future of desalination plants in California, beginning its fourth year of drought, is grim.

Rob Deutschman, vice chairman of merchant bank Cappello Group and an early financial backer of the Carlsbad plant, told Bloomberg News that the project “required far more equity capital and development capital than we anticipated.”

“In hindsight was it a good investment? Probably not,” said Deutschman.

Greenhut said some investors “were no longer sure” the plant “could turn a profit,” given all the traps it had to negotiate. Another needed desalination plant is being planned up the coast in Huntington Beach, but who would invest in a project that will be held up so often and so exhaustively that the profit will be taken out of it?

And this is only one story.

While much of the state turns brown for lack of water, a proposal to raise the Shasta Dam — which is located in the northern reaches of the state and holds back California’s largest reservoir — by 18.5 feet above its 602-foot height goes nowhere. Once completed, the $1.3 billion project would boost the reservoir’s capacity by about 14% and the state’s water supply by the equivalent of an entirely new dam, even though it would still be nearly 200 feet short of its initially planned height of 800 feet.

Blame the usual opponents of progress.

“Anytime you want to change anything in California water, it’s a big deal,” Jay Lund, director of the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, told a public radio outlet in the region.

“There’s always 500 different interests lined up on 500 different sides. There’s always going to be someone who’s unhappy, and they all have lawyers.”

Two of the “500” or so interests who oppose enlarging the reservoir are environmentalists and an Indian tribe. Each represents some of the heavier political forces in California and Washington. So expect officials to give them preferential treatment over the millions downstream — including farmers whose livelihoods depend on a steady water supply — who need relief.

California has not built a major water project in more than 35 years. Yet, as the state population has swelled by more than 55% over that time, officials have been unwilling to do what’s necessary to ensure an ample supply of water. It’s negligence of the highest order.

The only consequential project that can be built in the parched state is a bullet train, a costly boondoggle to nowhere whose only “riders” will be the politically connected who make out on the deal.

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

No Comments

Siskiyou Co: Possible homicide being investigated in Happy Camp

Sheriff Jon Lopey, Siskiyou Sheriff's report

SHERIFF’S OFFICE INVESTIGATING POSSIBLE HOMICIDE”

On Tuesday, December 29, 2015, at about 7:23 p.m., Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) units arrived at a residence in the 900 block of Curly Jack Road in the Happy Camp area, in response to a report of a dead body at the location. Upon arrival a SCSO sergeant and deputy located a deceased male adult in the residence.

Information and evidence developed at the scene indicated the death was a possible homicide and a crime scene and extensive follow-up investigation was initiated by the SCSO’s Major Crimes’ Unit. SCSO investigators and a Forensic Technician spent most of the night processing the crime scene and gathering evidence in support of their follow-up investigation. The identification of the deceased victim in this case is pending notification of the next-of-kin.

According to Sheriff Jon Lopey, “At this time, the SCSO’s Major Crimes’ Unit is developing investigative leads, analyzing results of the crime scene investigation, and awaiting the results of a forensic autopsy, which is scheduled to be conducted within the next day or two.

Anyone with information about the case is urged to contact the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office 24-hour Dispatch Center at (530) 841-2900.”

No Comments

Official: California snowpack at 136 percent of normal but doesn’t mark end of drought

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather

U.S. News and World Report

Associated Press   December 30, 2015, at 4:08 pm

By RICH PEDRONCELLI and SCOTT SMITH, Associated Press

ECHO SUMMIT, Calif. (AP) — The water content of the Sierra Nevada snowpack in drought-stricken California was 136 percent of normal Wednesday when officials took the winter’s first manual survey — an encouraging result after nearly no snow was found at the site in April.

The latest snow level is a good sign, “but that’s it — it’s a start,” said Frank Gehrke, chief of the California Cooperative Snow Surveys Program for the Department of Water Resources.

After four years of drought, Gehrke plunged a measuring pole into a thick field of snow in the Central Sierra, which includes Lake Tahoe. His survey followed an electronic measurement last week that put the water content of the snowpack at 112 percent of normal. Even more snow has fallen since then.

The snowpack provides about 30 percent of California’s water supply during the months when it melts and rushes through rivers and streams to fill reservoirs that remain critically low.

Last Jan. 1, the snowpack was a meager 45 percent of the historical average. On April 1, it had dropped to a record low of 5 percent.

Gehrke said snow must continue falling through April for him to feel confident the drought is easing.

“There’s going to be those anxious moments when we start to get into a week, a week-and-a-half with no snow,” he said.

A brewing El Nino system — a warming in the Pacific Ocean that alters weather worldwide — is expected to impact California and the rest of the nation in the coming months, according to a NASA report released Tuesday.

Its effects on California’s drought are hard to predict, but Jet Propulsion Laboratory climatologist Bill Patzert said it should bring some relief. El Ninos in the early 1980s and late 1990s brought about twice as much rain as normal, he said.

The weather also caused mudslides, flooding and high surf in Southern California.

“The water story for much of the American West over most of the past decade has been dominated by punishing drought,” Patzert said. “Now, we’re preparing to see the flip-side of nature’s water cycle — the arrival of steady, heavy rains and snowfall.”

Forecasters say a light to moderate storm system is expected in Northern California early next week.

___

Smith reported from Fresno, California.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.usnews.com/news/us/articles/2015-12-30/official-california-snowpack-at-136-percent-of-normal

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

No Comments

Valley Oaks Bingo 12-31-15

Enjoy

Siskiyou County

Scott Valley Valley Oaks Bingo

Greenview Hall

on Quartz Valley Road

New Year’s Eve

Thursday, Dec. 31, 2015

Early Birds start at 6:30 p.m.

Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Please bring finger foods

Hot Shot:  $186

Progress: $140

Door Prize — two of $50 rolls of $1 coins

No Comments
« Older Posts