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Browsing the blog archives for June, 2016.

Sheriff: Grizzly kills person near Glacier National Park

Wildlife

A grizzly bear attacked and killed a 38-year-old mountain biker Wednesday as he was riding along a trail just outside Glacier National Park, Montana authorities said.

Brad Treat and another rider were in the Halfmoon Lakes area of the Flathead National Forest when they apparently surprised the bear, Flathead County Sheriff Chuck Curry said.

The bear knocked Treat off his bike, and the second rider left to look for help, Curry said.

Authorities found Treat’s body at the scene, but not the bear. Wildlife and law-enforcement officials were searching for the grizzly Wednesday evening.

Treat was a law-enforcement officer with the U.S. Forest Service.

“Brad was an integral member of our area law enforcement team and a friend to us all,” Curry said.

Treat grew up in nearby Kalispell, where was a standout distance runner in high school, his former coach, Paul Jorgenson, told the Flathead Beacon newspaper.

“He was a really good runner but he was also a kind-hearted person who cared about people,” Jorgenson told the Beacon.

The second rider, who was not identified, was not injured. Authorities have closed the area, which is about 3 miles away from Glacier’s west entrance, for public safety.

Grizzlies in the Lower 48 states have been designated a threatened species since the 1970s, but their numbers are increasing and so are conflicts between humans and bears.

The grizzlies in the Glacier area among about 1,000 bears in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem, which also includes the Bob Marshall Wilderness south of the park. At least 700 more grizzlies live in and around Yellowstone National Park, which is roughly 360 miles south of Glacier.

Six people have been fatally mauled by bears in the Northern Rockies since 2010, but those deaths were mainly in the Yellowstone area. Glacier officials say there are usually one or two non-lethal encounters between bears and humans each year inside the park.

Before Wednesday, there had been 10 bear-related human deaths in Glacier since the park was created in 1910. The last was in 1998, when three bears killed and partially ate a park vendor employee while he was hiking.

In the most well-known Glacier attacks, bears killed two people in different parts of the park in a single night in 1967. Those attacks became the subject of a 1969 book by Jack Olsen titled “Night of the Grizzlies,” and later a documentary by the same name.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/06/30/sheriff-grizzly-kills-person-near-glacier-national-park.html?intcmp=hplnws

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Shasta water release plan has no cutbacks to farmers – for now

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather, California Rivers, California water, Dams other than Klamath

SacBee.com

June 29, 2016 3:51 PM

Highlights

Decision a victory for Central Valley growers

Federal fisheries officials reverse their stance

Compromise still expected to save Chinook salmon

 After weeks of uncertainty and pressure from members of Congress, federal officials on Wednesday announced a plan for managing water releases from California’s largest reservoir this summer in a manner that will not involve cutbacks in farm water deliveries – at least if all goes as hoped.

For more than a month, federal agencies have battled behind the scenes over how to balance the needs of California farms and two endangered fish species whose populations have been decimated by years of drought and environmental decline.

Federal fisheries officials – who hold considerable sway over how the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation operates Shasta Dam and other federal reservoirs – had been weighing whether to hold back substantial volumes of water at Shasta Lake into the summer to protect juvenile winter-run Chinook salmon. A companion proposal called for letting more water flow to the Pacific Ocean through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta during summer, in hopes of bolstering survival rates for another species teetering on the brink of extinction, the Delta smelt.

Both plans met with forceful opposition from Central Valley farmers, who rely heavily on Shasta water deliveries for irrigation. The proposals would have meant another year of curtailed deliveries during key portions of the growing season.

Instead, the Shasta plan released Wednesday marked a victory for farm interests and a significant about-face for fisheries officials. Rather than the more drastic proposal under discussion, the National Marine Fisheries Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reverted to a model for operating Shasta Dam that stays the course for giving farmers more water deliveries than in recent years.

Agency officials said their compromise plan should still result in ample cool water to keep endangered winter-run Chinook from dying in the Sacramento River. The bureau will be required to closely monitor temperatures in Shasta Lake to ensure that cold-water releases are possible through summer and fall. If they determine that Shasta is too warm, they will cut back releases to ensure there is enough cool water for later in the year.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/water-and-drought/article86742377.html#emlnl=Morning_Newsletter#storylink=cpy

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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UTAH: Old West showdown? Freeway cattle drive pits Utah ranchers against state

Agriculture, cattle, Ranch life

ksl.com

By Amy Joi O’Donoghue   |

Posted Jun 29th, 2016 @ 9:59pm

MORGAN — Longstanding and bitter disputes between government and ranchers in the West are becoming increasingly normal, pitting grazers against “bureaucrats” who they say are acting to drive them out of business.

The ranchers’ combatants in high-profile cases that boiled over in recent years in Nevada and Oregon are federal agencies.

In pastoral Morgan County, a ranching family’s enemy is not some Washington, D.C., controlled agency, but the state of Utah.

The Charles Pentz family intends to trail their 90 head of cattle east on about an 8-mile section of I-84 from Morgan to the Devils Slide area at Croydon early Thursday — a cattle-moving tradition they say they have engaged in each year, twice a year, since at least 1951.

Their attorney, Aaron Bergman, said the state recently put up a concrete barrier over the cattle guard at an on-ramp to prevent access to the interstate and block the trailing.

Steve Pentz, Charles Pentz’s son and executor of the estate, added the state has threatened and harassed the family over the years to get them to stop the trailing, which moves mother cows and their calves to summer grazing on land at a higher elevation.

“We are going to take them up there in the morning and trail them up the freeway,” he said Wednesday. “I guess we will see what happens. That is the only thing we can do.”

In the past, when the ranchers moved their cattle over the Utah Department of Transportation’s objections, Bergman said state troopers showed up anyway to provide traffic control for the three-hour event.

No one is quite sure what will ultimately unfold Thursday, but Steve Pentz said he’s had troopers show up at his home in the past, threatening to arrest him if the cattle drive is carried out.

“I asked them on what charges, and they told me they could just do it,” he said.

Utah Highway Patrol Sgt. Todd Royce said he’s unaware of any incidents involving Pentz and troopers, but said his agency will provide traffic control for the safety of motorists and the ranchers. Typically, one lane on the eastbound interstate is kept open.

This year’s trailing of cattle has threatened to become more confrontational, in Bergman’s view, because of a lawsuit the Charles Pentz Estate filed in April suing the Utah Department of Transportation.

“(The Utah Attorney General’s Office) indicated to me pretty emphatically that UDOT will not remove the barriers and that basically the estate is on its own, which we take as a very spiteful move because these barriers were never in place until the litigation was filed,” Bergman said. “It is an inappropriate and vindictive move on the part of the state.”

With a rain shower passing through, Lane Pentz and his family drive their cattle up the road in Morgan to a temporary pasture Wednesday, June 29, 2016. (Photo: Spenser Heaps, Deseret News)

UDOT spokesman John Gleason said he could not comment on the allegations raised against the state and its dealings with the Pentz family due to the pending litigation.

“Our primary concern is for the safety of the traveling public, and for those operating the cattle drive,” he said.

Stormy history

The Pentz family has been in negotiations with the transportation agency for years over moving their cattle on the interstate.

Seven years before I-84 was constructed, Charles Pentz trailed cattle on Highway 30 until it was torn up and paved over to make room for the widened transportation corridor in 1958.

Bergman said the Pentz family was adamant over maintaining access.

“There were meetings back in the ’70s when this became an issue,” he said.

By 2005, the state decided it lacked any legal obligation to allow the cattle trailing to continue, but two years later, the Department of Commerce’s Office of Property Rights Ombudsman declared in an advisory opinion that Utah was required under a 1998 state law to provide an alternative route.

CattleAdvance Amy Joi O’Donoghue Freeway cattle drive (Photo: Heather Tuttle)

The Utah Attorney General’s Office, arguing before the district court that the lawsuit should be dismissed, stressing that the advisory opinion does not carry the weight of law and is therefore inadmissible.

A few years later, transportation officials and the Pentz family were negotiating transporting the cattle by truck instead of moving them up the canyon the traditional way.

According to Bergman’s lawsuit, UDOT agreed to pay the transportation costs for the cattle, but then balked after asserting the costs were too high. Another year, the agency said it would find its own trucking company to move the cattle at its expense, but haulers never showed up, the suit asserts.

Bergman said disputes over costs continued into 2013, when the department embarked on a feasibility study to assess how much it would cost to build an 8.5-mile trail as an alternative route between Stoddard Ranch and Lost Creek Ranch.

The Pentz family, in fact, prefers to trail the cattle rather than truck them, especially given the stress on the calves.

“It is a lot quicker and easier if we trail them rather than truck them,” Steve Pentz said. “When we truck them, it is an all-day operation into the night, compared to three or four hours.”

The costs of an alternative route, according to the suit, came out to be $77,000 per mile.

The Pentz family drives their cattle up the road in Morgan on Wednesday, June 29, 2016. (Photo: Spenser Heaps, Deseret News)

The state, however, is arguing before a district court judge in Morgan County that it is not required to build such a trail. Attorneys insist the 1998 law is discretionary, not mandatory, and it has no obligation to provide access to I-84 because it is now a restricted access highway that — as an example — the state has declared off limits to off-highway vehicles and pedestrians.

But the Pentz family maintains the law is clear about the state’s obligations. The law says when state highways with heavy traffic are regularly used for the movement of livestock, the transportation agency and the involved county or city governments “shall construct and maintain” livestock trails.

“The way we look at it is they built the freeway over our stock trail,” Pentz said.

The state has fired back with multiple legal arguments, including statute of limitations having run out, assertions that the suit was filed wrongly to exclude Morgan city and Morgan County, and claims denouncing the estate’s ability to bring an action.

As the wrangling has gone back and forth over the years, the trailing of the cattle always seems to continue in a tradition the family says they want to pass on to the next generation.

“It’s a sad situation they are in,” Bergman said. “It is sad that the state and UDOT have not simply owned up and done what the Legislature demanded they do. Instead they are repeatedly trying to weasel out of it.”

Contributing: Andrew Adams

https://ksl.com/?sid=40444874

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

 

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Siskiyou Co: Pony Fire update 6-29-16

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

Happy Camp, CA — The Pony Fire is burning on the Klamath National Forest, about fifteen miles southwest of Happy Camp and west of Highway 96.  The fire remains at 2,858 acres and 63 percent contained.  The fire has not grown in the last week.

Crews continue to make great progress on mop-up operations along the fire’s perimeter and continued to patrol the containment lines on the northern, eastern and southern perimeters. Aerial reconnaissance located another small slop-over near the Swillup Creek drainage and crews acted quickly to mitigate any fire spread potential.   Aircraft and firefighters will continue to keep a close eye on this area of concern.  After a few days of little activity, a small smoke was spotted in the southernmost “finger” of the fire.  This area of concern will be monitored by aircraft due to steepness of the terrain and firefighter safety concerns.  Burning logs rolling down hill will continue to be the biggest threat.

Temperatures were above average for the beginning of the week and will stay that way for the remainder.  The return of the hot weather is helping to feed small patches of unburned fuel within the interior of the fire.  The fire may see some possible cumulus build up on Thursday that may lead the way for cooler temperatures over the weekend.  The fire is expected to continue to creep and smolder, with the possibility of single tree torching through the week.

For public and firefighter safety, a temporary closure order has been issued for lands within and adjacent to the Pony fire.  The closed area includes National Forest land west of Highway 96, north of the Ukonom Ranger District boundary, east of Siskiyou Wilderness, and south of a line defined along Crawford Creek, Forest Road 15N19, and Bear Creek/Kelsey Trail.  Dillon Creek Campground remains open.

More information and maps of the closure area are available on the Klamath National Forest website (www.fs.usda.gov/klamath).

Information, maps, and closures are also posted on Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4769/.

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Liz Writes Life 6-28-16

Liz Writes Life

June 28, 2016

Liz Writes Life

Published in Siskiyou Daily News, Yreka, CA

POW

Mike Adams, president of Scott Valley Protect Our Water, shared alarming news with the group last Thursday night. The California legislature is on a runaway train of passing bills to restrict the 2nd Amendment. Nearly a dozen have passed out of committees and are headed for vote in the assembly and senate. One horrendous bill demands anyone who wants to purchase ammunition to first obtain a license. That is AB156 and the purchaser will also be limited to how much he can buy; and you will not be able to purchase from the internet or out of state.

Next — It looks like PacifiCorp, with the blessing of FERC (the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) is making moves to pass ownership of the Klamath dams to the new non-profit Dam Removal Entity that was established two months ago. Remember this newest amended Klamath Settlement Agreement was signed by California and Oregon Brown Governors, the Bureau of Reclamation, Yurok Tribe, etc. back in April.

Richard Marshall, President of the Siskiyou Water Users Assoc., told us the non-profit Dam Removal Entity (DRE) has yet to make its board members public and is already 30 days past the deadline. The only information the CA. Secretary of State has on the DRE is an address on the 42nd floor of a building in New York City!

Richard is frustrated that there has been no disclosure of information by the DRE and why the CA. Sec. of State hasn’t demanded it. And he questions if the DRE even has enough money to pay PacifiCorp for the dams and resulting environmental damage that will occur. He then turned some of his ire towards the Siskiyou Co. Board of Supervisors for not pursuing several angles to stop the destruction of the dams.

Ray Haupt, Supervisor for Siskiyou Co. Dist. 5, had answers for Richard and Siskiyou Water Users Assoc.

First, he said the Klamath dams are always the top priority and major discussion item for the supervisors in their closed session meetings and those meetings are with their lawyers.

“We have spent over a half million dollars,” said Ray, fighting to save the dams. He added the county recently fought with the State of California over the fact that Collier Rest Stop and I-5 bridge will be flooded, if the dams come out. That argument was to no avail. Also the fact that the Klamath River is designated “Wild and Scenic”, and should be protected, has fallen on deaf ears. A Bi-State Alliance was established with Oregon’s Klamath County to stand against dam removal. This alliance has been ignored by the state governors.

The county has joined with various groups to create “standing” so more legal action can be taken. Being proactive, the county estimates the price tag for legal fees to fight this most recent FERC process will be $100,000. The county is also pursuing an Endangered Species Act strategy and that price tag will be around $400,000.

“There are two governors above us who refuse to follow the law,” said Ray. “We are following the rules, but the state and feds are not. The state’s (California) position is that this is a done deal.”

Ray said our county supervisors have not given up and are constantly pursuing any and all strategies that could save the Klamath dams. Lawsuits, studies and strategies are costly and they are working to get the best bang for their bucks.

Unfortunately, courts constantly rule against sanity when dealing with environmental issues – that is my comment. I also believe the strangest culprits in this situation are PacifiCorp and FERC for their backroom deals. PacifiCorp should be concerned about its customers – us – and FERC is the watchdog to keep corruption in check. There is big money behind these Klamath dams coming out, but I wonder if the non-profit DRE will actually come through with funds to pay PacifiCorp.

Another action that has been suggested is for Siskiyou County to condemn the dams and take them over. But the cost for relicensing the dams through FERC is millions plus the huge unknown price of liability. The Greenies will be the first to sue the county, then California, demanding the dams be taken out. That cost will be immense. The county didn’t even have $9 million to add for building a new jail.

Yep, it seems like there should be a silver bullet, but this situation is extremely complicated with courts, agencies, state governors, Dept. of Interior, Tribes and Greenie groups marching forth like a mammoth unscrupulous army.

Garden

Some of the over-winter onions are making large bulbs, but the one tall shoot that has the seed pod on top has a tough ring in the onion. When I slice the onion, I find that ring and pull it out. The rest of the onion is really good and not tough.

The carrots, cucumbers, green beans, watermelon and cantaloupe are growing by leaps and bounds.

I harvested a second crop of rhubarb and mulched what was left with the giant leaves.

Now to keep the water flowing!

Liz Bowen is a native of Siskiyou County and lives near Callahan. Call her at 530-467-3515.

# # #

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Yreka Tea Party Patriots meet 6-28-16

TEA Party

Yreka Tea Party Patriots

Meeting for Tuesday, June 28th

6:30 PM at the Covenant Chapel Church

200 Greenhorn Rd.   Yreka  

Video:

The Truth About Cancer..

What is Cancer

You won’t want to miss this documentary if you are battling cancer, someone you love has cancer or you have a family history of cancer.  This is not our usual tea party topic.

Free….no membership.  Doors open at 6PM, come early to socialize with like-minded people.

Contact Louise @ 530-842-5443

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Judge invalidates long-fought Delta management plan

Agriculture - California, CA Farm Water Coalition, California water

From California Farm Water Coalition

June 27, 2016

Judge invalidates long-fought Delta management plan

Sacramento Bee

In a decision that could delay or complicate Gov. Jerry Brown’s plan to build two huge tunnels in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, a Superior Court judge ruled Friday that a comprehensive management plan for the estuary is no longer valid.

Sacramento Superior Court Judge Michael P. Kenny ruled that the entire Delta Plan must be “set aside” until deficiencies he noted in an earlier ruling are fixed. State officials say they plan to appeal.

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Siskiyou County: Pony Fire update 6-27-16

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

Happy Camp, CA — The Pony Fire is burning on the Klamath National Forest, about fifteen miles southwest of Happy Camp and west of Highway 96.  The fire remains at 2,858 acres and 63 percent contained.  In the past week the fire has grown just three acres.

Over the weekend, crews made good progress on mop-up operations along the fire’s perimeter and continued to patrol the containment lines on the northern, eastern and southern perimeters.  A fallen burning snag was spotted on the eastern perimeter near the Swillup Creek drainage; crews and aircraft acted quickly to mitigate any fire spread potential.  The perimeter will continue to be monitored by aircraft and firefighters. Crews completed chipping operations near Highway 96 and Forest Road 15N30 (Pony Peak Ridge Road).   A track-mounted chipper arrived on the incident and is currently working on Forest Road 14N39 (Pony Peak Road), removing piles of cut brush along the roadside.  Crews will continue to remove snags to provide for firefighter safety.

Temperatures continued to rise over the weekend, marking the beginning of a warming trend that will bring lower humidity, along with above-average temperatures.  No precipitation is expected with the warming trend.  The fire is expected to continue to creep and smolder, with the possibility of single tree torching through the week.

Firefighter safety continues to be our main priority and a Rapid Extraction Module (REM) arrived on the incident to help us meet this objective.  The module includes two firefighters, one a paramedic and one an emergency medical technician, both with special training to transport injured firefighters and provide medical services in difficult terrain.  Burning logs rolling down hill will continue to be the biggest threat.

For public and firefighter safety, a temporary closure order has been issued for lands within and adjacent to the Pony fire.  The closed area includes National Forest land west of Highway 96, north of the Ukonom Ranger District boundary, east of Siskiyou Wilderness, and south of a line defined along Crawford Creek, Forest Road 15N19, and Bear Creek/Kelsey Trail.  Dillon Creek Campground remains open.

More information and maps of the closure area are available on the Klamath National Forest website (www.fs.usda.gov/klamath).

Information, maps, and closures are also posted on Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4769/.

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Committee Holds Hearing on LaMalfa Tule Lake Historic Site Bill

Doug LaMalfa Congressman CA

June 24, 2016

Washington DC – The House Natural Resources Committee’s Subcommittee on Federal Lands held a hearing on a bill Rep. Doug LaMalfa (CA-R) sponsored to create a National Historic Site on the location of a World War II internment camp. The measure, HR 4387, removes the location from the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument and creates the Tule Lake National Historic Site. LaMalfa stated that he believed Tule Lake was distinct from the Pacific Ocean battlefields which make up the rest of the monument and should be recognized in its own right.

“This bill will recognize the shameful events that occurred at the Tule Lake Camp, where thousands of Japanese Americans were unconstitutionally detained. The Tule Lake National Historic Site will serve as a stark reminder that Americans must always be vigilant in the defense of their rights, during both peace and war,” said LaMalfa. “The measure ensures that the historic site and local community work in tandem by requiring the Park Service to develop its management plan with input from the adjacent airport, the City of Tulelake, and Modoc County. Finally, it lets residents decide what’s best for their community by requiring any expansion to receive the support of the city and county before moving forward.”  

Modoc County resident Nick Macy, operator of the Tulelake Airport adjacent to the existing monument, testified about the community’s support for recognizing the historic nature of the location and engaging local residents in future management of the site. The airport employs several dozen residents, making it one of the largest private employers in Modoc County. While some groups have advocated for significant expansion of the existing monument, the expansion proposals would result in the closure of the airport. HR 4387 prohibits any expansion of the Historic Site without written concurrence from the City of Tulelake and Modoc County.

“Our community has always supported telling the story of the men and women who were incarcerated so that this wrong is never repeated. HR 4387 strikes a balance between respecting the events that took place at the Tule Lake camp and protecting the agricultural economy of the area’s 900 family farms,” Macy said.

Congressman Doug LaMalfa is a lifelong farmer representing California’s First Congressional District, including Butte, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou and Tehama Counties.

###

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Siskiyou Co: Pony Fire update 6-24-16

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

Happy Camp, CA — The Pony Fire is burning on the Klamath National Forest, about fifteen miles southwest of Happy Camp and west of Highway 96.  The fire remains at 2,858 acres and 60 percent contained.

On Thursday, crews again patrolled containment lines on the northern, eastern and southern perimeters.  Firefighters hiked to the southeast edge of the fire to confirm the Wednesday helicopter water drops used there had checked fire growth.  Crews also continued using a chipper to create a fuel break to protect homes along Highway 96.

Temperatures are expected to rise slightly on Friday, marking the beginning of a warming and drying trend that will extend into next week.  The fire is expected to continue to creep and smolder on Friday, with burning logs rolling downhill the biggest threat.  Crews will continue to patrol all containment lines and use chippers to reduce brushy fuels.  With engine support, crews are planning to check for hotspots just off a dozer line above the “fingers” of fire in the Dillon Creek drainage.

For public and firefighter safety, a temporary closure order has been issued for lands within and adjacent to the Pony fire.  The closed area includes National Forest land west of Highway 96, north of the Ukonom Ranger District boundary, east of Siskiyou Wilderness, and south of a line defined along Crawford Creek, Forest Road 15N19, and Bear Creek/Kelsey Trail.  Dillon Creek Campground remains open.

More information and maps of the closure area are available on the Klamath National Forest website (www.fs.usda.gov/klamath).

Information, maps, and closures are also posted on Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4769/.

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