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Browsing the blog archivesfor the day Monday, April 10th, 2017.

Erin Ryan to speak at Yreka Tea Party Patriots 4-11-17

TEA Party

Yreka Tea Party Patriots

Meeting for Tuesday, April 11th

6:30 PM at the Covenant Chapel Church

200 Greenhorn Rd.   Yreka 

Speaker:

Erin Ryan

Field Representative for Congressman Doug La Malfa

 

Free….no membership.  Doors open at 6PM, come early to socialize with likeminded people.

 

Contact Louise @ 530-842-5443

 

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Former Northern California tribal chair gets death penalty for gun, knife attack on fellow members

Tribes

ALTURAS The former head of a Northern California Indian tribe was sentenced to death Monday for a 2014 rampage inside the tribal hall that left four people dead.

Cherie Louise Rhoades will be taken to San Quentin to await execution.

Judge Candace Beason called the killings at the Cedarville Rancheria Tribal Headquarters “intentional, premeditated and willful,” rejecting the option to modify a Placer County jury’s death sentence to life in prison.

Dressed in a grey-striped prison jumpsuit and plastic orange shoes, Rhoades, 47, shook her head as she listened to the judge read the sentence during a three-hour hearing in Modoc County Superior Court.

Rhoades was a former chairwoman of the 35-member Cedarville Rancheria Tribe of Northern Paiute. She launched her attack on her fellow tribal members, including three close relatives, during a Feb. 20, 2014 hearing at which the tribal council was expected to decide whether Rhoades and her son should be evicted from tribal housing. She had been suspended as chairwoman pending a federal investigation into allegations that she embezzled at least $50,000 from the tribe.

After asking that all the windows be closed at the tribal hearing, she pulled out a 9 mm semi-automatic handgun and began shooting in a rampage that continued several minutes.

Pronounced dead at the scene were Rhoades’ brother, Rurik Davis, 50, her niece; Angel Penn, 19, her nephew, Glenn Calonicco, 30, and Shelia Lynn Russo, 47, a tribal administrator who managed evictions.

After she emptied at least one firearm, Rhoades grabbed a butcher knife and began stabbing people. Sisters Melissa Davis and Monica Davis were both injured.

Now chairwoman of the tribe with nine adult voting members, Melissa Davis appeared at the hearing. Her mother, Diane Henley, was among the victims who addressed Rhoades directly: “You tried to wipe out my daughters. They survived. They are stronger than ever. Nothing is going to stop them from moving on, and you will not be a part of it,” Henley said.

Phillip Russo, Shelia Russo’s husband, told Rhoades “Shelia lives forever… and you will be forgotten and die alone.”

Before delivering her sentence, Beason denied a defense motion for a new trial. Defense Attorney Antonio Alvarez argued that the testimony of then-Alturas Police Chief Ken Barnes was “false,” weakening his case that Rhoades did not plan the murders.

District Attorney Jordan Funk called the motion “a tempest in a teapot.”

Beason also tentatively authorized $64,874 be paid in restitution to the victims pending further discussions with the attorneys.

Read more here:

http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/crime/article143794574.html#storylink=cpy

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Liz Writes Life 4-4-17

Liz Writes Life

April 4, 2017

Liz Writes Life

Published in Siskiyou Daily News

Senate Bill 54 is causing a stir throughout the state. On March 29, 2017, it received its third amendment vote in the state senate committee and is headed to the senate floor for a vote. To become law, it will need to also pass the assembly and then signed by Gov. Jerry Brown. Proponents want the bill to pass, which will make California a “sanctuary” state creating a showdown that will be in direct opposition to federal and state law.

Basically, existing California law says that when arresting someone who may not be a citizen of the United States, the arresting agency shall notify the appropriate agency of the United States to take charge of any deportation matters. SB 54 will repeal this and create a lack of communication among law enforcement agencies.

Siskiyou Co. Sheriff Jon Lopey told me the Siskiyou Co. Supervisors were “courageous” on Feb. 21, 2017, when they voted 4-1 to uphold the U.S. and California Constitutions and continue to comply with federal immigration laws. In other words, our county supervisors did not designate Siskiyou a “sanctuary” jurisdiction.

Sheriff Jon agrees. He said he has taken an oath to uphold both the U.S. and California Constitutions and is worried how county law enforcement will be able to interact with federal agencies regarding arrests of illegal aliens if SB 54 becomes law.

“When we encounter illegal aliens we are to assess that crime and we need to have that discretion – often times there are gray areas like drug trafficking or burglars or thieves that may not be considered violent, but we should be free to cooperate with federal authorities and enforce the law,” Sheriff Jon said. He is not happy that state legislators are interfering and affecting the abilities of county sheriffs.

“Currently, we have to enforce the federal, state and local laws and a sheriff should be free to make those decisions as they are public health and safety issues. We need to do the right thing and protect our citizens,” he explained.

The California State Sheriffs’ Association is also frustrated and voted to oppose SB 54. Just last week, L.A. County Sheriff Jim McDonnell voiced specific opposition, because it would limit involvement by law enforcement agencies in any federal immigration enforcement action. This creates a real problem when the county jails are housing inmates, who might be subject to deportation, according to Sheriff McDonnell.

The problem isn’t only in California as recently, Sheriff Jon attended a Western State Sheriffs’ Association meeting, where a high-priority on-going discussion is figuring out how to effectively deal with criminal illegal aliens.

And, it isn’t just sheriffs who are raising an alarm.

Last week, a group of elected officials and mayors in San Diego County announced they will organize opposition to SB 54.

El Cajon Mayor Bill Wells called a press conference on March 29, 2017 and announced a new group called “Mayors for Safe Cities.” He explained that SB 54 will not prevent Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) from doing deportation raids, but that ICE would not have the help of local or state police. ICE agents will also be banned from entering county jails to interview inmates suspected of living in the U.S. illegally. Mayor Wells added that this will likely allow more violent illegal felons back onto the streets than protect non-violent and innocent immigrants.

State Senator Kevin De Leon authored SB 54 and represents Senate District 24, which encompasses downtown and East Los Angeles. De Leon wields power as the State Senate leader Pro Tem. SB 54 will most likely pass the senate and the question is: Will the assembly be willing to stop the bill?

Sediment

One of the biggest complaints by our county, the Siskiyou Water Users Assoc., other groups and individuals — regarding the proposed removal of the four hydro-electric Klamath dams — is the tremendous amount of sediment that will be released from behind the dams. The millions of cubic feet of sediment will affect water quality, kill fish and salmon runs and do incredible damage to the environment.

For verification of these accusations, we only need to look north to the state of Washington where two large dams were removed in 2012 and 2014 – the Elwha dam that was only five miles up the Elwha River and the Glines Canyon Dam that was 13 miles up the Elwha River. The Dept. of Interior is the lead agency, but it is the National Park Service that is being unresponsive to resulting affects by excess sediment.

The city of Port Angeles with a harbor on the Strait of Juan de Fuca is having problems with its water intake and treatment facility from too much sediment that is still flowing from the removal of both dams.

An article published in the Peninsula Daily News, last week, explains the city council has tried to obtain information about the contract with a Freedom of Information Act and during the past nine months, the Park Service has not responded. So Port Angeles is now threatening a lawsuit.

The Park Service pledged to maintain the amount and quality of water available to the city and its residents through the city’s municipal and industrial water rights under the 1992 Elwha River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act and again in the contract for dam removals. With the dramatic increase in sediment, the city has found problems with its treatment facility and an unresponsive Park Service.

The newer intake and treatment facilities were built to treat much of the estimated 3.4 million cubic yards of sediment released by dam removal, but has not been adequate.

My internet friend, Pearl Hewett, is a voice against the removals of those dams. She has seen first-hand several feet of mud-sediment flow into the National Park campgrounds and roads each winter. It doesn’t look like the environmental damage is stopping.

Yep, very interesting information indeed.

Liz Bowen is a native of Siskiyou County and lives near Callahan. Call her at 530-467-3515.

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Editorial: Get serious about more California water storage

Air, Climate & Weather, California water

EDITORIAL: Drought’s over for most in California. Now let’s get serious about more water storage.

Fresno Bee

April 7, 2017

Friday, while the heavens were drenching the Valley with heavy rains, Gov. Jerry Brown lifted his emergency drought declaration for most of California.

If you’re thinking that means it’s perfectly OK to take extra-long showers, saturate your lawn with water this summer or stop planting drought-resistant shrubs and flowers, you’d be wrong.

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