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USFS: The Pacific Southwest Region invites public input

U.S. Forest Service

YREKA, Calif.; March 20, 2017 – The Pacific Southwest Region (Region 5) is inviting the public to help identify trails that will be part of a U.S. Forest Service effort with partners and volunteers to increase the pace of trail maintenance.

Nationwide, the Forest Service will select nine to 15 priority areas among its nine regions where a backlog in trail maintenance contributed to reduced access, potential harm to natural resources or trail users and/or has the potential for increased future deferred maintenance costs.

Region 5 manages more than 16,000 miles of trails enjoyed by 16,100,000 users each year.  In Region 5, volunteers and partner groups contributed more than 178,000 hours in maintenance and repair of nearly 2,984 miles of trails last year.

“We are counting on our fellow Californians to help us identify where maintenance is needed,” said Randy Moore, regional forester for the Pacific Southwest Region. “The forest visitors who enjoy these trails year-round are the best source of information for what’s needed on the ground, and we’re counting on their expertise and willingness to help.”

Region 5 has until April 15 to submit at least three regional proposals to National Headquarters. Those proposals will be weighed against proposal submitted by other Forest Service regions.

The trail maintenance effort is outlined in the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act of 2016 and aims to increase trail maintenance by volunteers and partners by 100% by the end of 2021.

The selected sites will be part of the initial focus that will include a mosaic of areas with known trail maintenance needs that include areas near urban and remote areas, such as wilderness, are of varying sizes and trail lengths, are motorized and non-motorized, and those that incorporate a varied combination of partner and volunteer approaches and solutions.

The Forest Service manages more than 158,000 miles of trail – the largest trail system in the nation – providing motorized and non-motorized trail access across 154 national forests and grasslands. These Forest Service trails are well-loved and highly used with more than 84 million trail visits annually, helping to support mostly rural economies.

The Forest Service receives widespread support from tens of thousands of volunteers and partners each year who, in 2015, contributed nearly 1.4 million hours – a value of about $31.6 million – in maintenance and repair of nearly 30,000 miles of trails.

However, limited funding compounded by the rising cost of wildfire operations, has resulted in less than 25 percent of Forest Service trails meeting all of the agency’s standards for safety, quality recreation and economic and environmental sustainability. The remaining trails meet standard to varying degrees.

To provide ideas and suggestions on potential priority areas and approaches for incorporating increased trail maintenance assistance from partners and volunteers, contact your local Forest Service office or Regional Trail Program Manager Garrett Villanueva at gvillanueva@fs.fed.us by April 7.

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CA Natural Resources pushes, again, for control over Siskiyou rivers

California Rivers, California water, Klamath River & Dams, Salmon and fish, Scott River & Valley, Siskiyou County, State gov

PNP comment: Look at the out-of-area dictators, who want to tell Siskiyou County and its residents how we should live. — Editor Liz Bowen

Additional comment by Rex Cozallio, landowner below Irongate dam near Hornbrook, CA:

I was extremely agitated and disheartened to become aware of this proposition that would severely impact our region submitted in February by a non resident assemblywoman  out of GLENDALE, California ‘sponsored’ (paid for) by ‘Friends of the River’, and ‘supported’ by 23 more profiting ‘non-profits’ and NO OPPOSITION!  This relentless onslaught, mounting countless paid for attacks with the ever-expanding objective of effectively confiscating vested private and public property without compensation or  impacted regional input, must end.  Quickly and quietly shoved through lobbied ‘legislative process’, their obvious and successful theory is that a certain portion will sneak through before sufficient public awareness, further empowering the unelected policy-driven bureaucratic power base permitting public oppression and the further social/economic division of classes.  This ‘provision’ adds an incredible, ridiculous, and impossible-to-survive complete and unimpeded REWILDING of the affected regional rivers, particularly the Klamath, Scott, and Shasta.  It not only prescribes unrestricted ‘natural’ accretion and avulsion of riparian property, it discretionarily restricts ANY use of riparian areas within a QUARTER OF A MILE of EACH side of the rivers.

In searching for the legislation last night, the ONLY reference I could find that wasn’t an unrelated 2013 Bill of the same number, was the sponsoring ‘Friends of the River’ website.  A link within that led to the Assembly woman’s promotional page.  From multiple calls I found out the Bill I heard about last night is in Natural Resource committee ‘hearings’ TODAY.  The only other ‘opportunity’ to publically ‘respond’ will be at the next as yet unscheduled or posted Administrative/Budgetary hearing.

After talking to the ‘legislative analyst’ Michael Jered about the unnotified and most impacted regions in opposition, I was admonished on several fronts.  Unequivocally saying that failing to access the information was my and the local representatives’ fault since it was submitted in February, and that I should take up any complaints with them, he graciously allowed that I may write a letter of opposition which he could ‘place in the file’, even though it would not be acknowledged, but would be ‘available’ in the event someone ‘wanted to read it’.

He also said I could have certainly gone to Sacramento to testify to the Committee ‘if I wanted’, but of course that ‘would not be possible for today’ and any failure to go to legis.ca.gov to inform myself was ‘my problem’, and that is ‘just the way the process works’.

Telling him it did not show up on a search of that site, he assured me that it was there and I just wasn’t doing it right.  Insisting I was wrong, he went to the legis site and said ‘just look at the 2015-2016 legislation’,  at which point he hesitated and said ‘oh, I guess they haven’t posted the years legislation yet’ (in March, and this is the first he knew?).

If you wish to call him, his number is 916-319-2092, but it appears the only way to impact the progression now is to actively push to somehow track it AFTER it no doubt passes through Committee today, the point at which we would likely have been the most able to rescind.

All the Best,

Rex Cozzalio

 

CA ab975..please read time sensitive, hearing date March 20th

Date of Hearing: March 20, 2017

ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES

Cristina Garcia, Chair

ABPCA Bill Id:AB 975 (

Author:Friedman) – As Introduced Ver:February 16, 2017

SUBJECT:  Natural resources:  wild and scenic rivers

SUMMARY:  Adds “historical, cultural, geological, ecological, hydrological (i.e., unique source, direction, or quantity of water flows), botanical or other values” to the values that certain rivers possess and the state should preserve.  Expands the area protected in the Wild and Scenic Rivers System (System) from immediately adjacent to the river segment to within a quarter mile of the river.

EXISTING LAW, pursuant to the California Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Act):

  • Declares that it is the policy of the state that certain rivers that possess extraordinary scenic, recreational, fishery, or wildlife values be preserved in their “free-flowing” state, together with their immediate environments, for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the state. Declares that such use of these rivers is the highest and most beneficial use and is a reasonable and beneficial use of water.

  • Defines “free-flowing” as existing or flowing without artificial impoundment, diversion, or other modification of the river. (The presence of low dams, diversion works, and other minor structures does not automatically bar a river’s inclusion within the System.)

  • Requires that those rivers or segments of rivers included in the System be classified as one of the following:

    1. Wild rivers, which are those rivers or segments of rivers that are free of impoundments and generally inaccessible except by trail, with watersheds or shorelines essentially primitive and waters unpolluted;

  1. Scenic rivers, which are those rivers or segments of rivers that are free of impoundments, with shorelines or watersheds still largely primitive and shorelines largely undeveloped but accessible in places by roads; or

  1. Recreational rivers, which are those rivers or segments of rivers that are readily accessible by road or railroad, may have some development along their shorelines, and may have undergone some impoundment or diversion in the past.

  • Designates several California rivers and segments thereof as components of the System.

  • Requires the Natural Resources Agency (NRA) to be responsible for coordinating the activities of state agencies whose activities affect the rivers in the System with those of other state, local, and federal agencies with jurisdiction over matters that may affect the rivers.

FISCAL EFFECT:  Unknown

 

COMMENTS:

  • Author’s statement:

AB 975 brings the California Wild and Scenic Rivers System more in line with the federal system, improving state management of rivers that enjoy dual state-federal designation, and allowing for the protection of existing and future state rivers that possess additional values beyond those currently mentioned in the Act.

  • The Act. The Act was passed in 1972 to preserve designated rivers possessing extraordinary scenic, recreation, fishery, or wildlife values.  With its initial passage, the System protected segments of the Smith River and tributaries, Klamath River and tributaries, Scott River, Salmon River, Trinity River, Eel River, Van Duzen River, and American River.  The System was subsequently expanded by the Legislature to include the East Carson and West Walker Rivers in 1989, the South Yuba River in 1999, the Albion River and Gualala Rivers in 2003, and Cache Creek in 2005.  In addition, segments of the McCloud River, Deer Creek, and Mill Creek were protected under the Act in 1989 and 1995 respectively, although these segments were not formally designated as components of the System.

The Act provides a number of legal protections for rivers included within the System, beginning with the following legislative declaration:

It is the policy of the State of California that certain rivers which possess extraordinary scenic, recreational, fishery, or wildlife values shall be preserved in their free-flowing state, together with their immediate environments, for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the state.  The Legislature declares that such use of these rivers is the highest and most beneficial use and is a reasonable and beneficial use of water within the meaning of Section 2 of Article X of the California Constitution.

The Act defines “free-flowing” as “existing or flowing without artificial impoundment, diversion, or other modification of the river.”  The existence of minor structures, or even major dams located upstream or downstream of a specific segment, does not preclude a river from designation.  Several rivers, such as the Klamath, Trinity, Eel, and Lower American, are included in the System despite substantial flow modifications by existing upstream dams and impoundments.

No dam, reservoir, diversion, or other water impoundment facility may be constructed on any river segment included in the System.  However, there are exemptions, which include temporary flood storage facilities on the Eel River and temporary recreational impoundments on river segments with a history of such impoundments.  NRA cannot authorize these temporary recreational impoundments without first making a number of findings.

A cornerstone of the Act is the non-degradation clause, which prohibits new projects and activities from adversely affecting the free-flowing condition and natural character of river segments included in the System.

The Act was patterned after the 1968 National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Federal Act).  The state and federal Acts share similar criteria and definitions in regard to the purpose of protecting rivers, the identification of free flowing rivers and extraordinary or outstanding values suitable for protection, establishing a study process to include rivers in the system, as well as an identical classification system.  The primary purpose of both the state and federal Acts is to prohibit new water impoundments on designated rivers.

  • Consistency with the Federal Act. The state Act differs from the Federal Act in that it does not recognize as many river values.  The additional values in the Federal Act include historical, cultural, geologic, and “other similar” values.  Federal agencies have interpreted “similar” values to include ecological, botanical, and hydrological.  When NRA studied the East Carson and West Walker Rivers they found them to have extraordinary hydrological values.  However, that value is not in the Act.  AB 975 adds the additional values considered by Federal agencies, but it also adds “other” values.  This differs from the Federal Act because it is vague compared to “other similar” values.  The author and committee may wish to consider amending the bill to reflect the Federal Act by using “other similar” values.

The Federal Act also creates protections within a quarter mile of a river in the system.  The state Act defines immediate environments to be immediately adjacent to the river, and defines river to include up to the first line of permanently established riparian vegetation.  AB 975 would align the state Act with the Federal Act by defining immediate environments to include within quarter mile of segments of the river.  This change would have the effect of directing state and local governments to act in a manner that protects the additional immediate environment.  In addition, AB 975 would provide more consistent direction for rivers in the federal System that the state manages.

  • Previous legislation.

AB 142 (Bigelow), Chapter 661, Statutes of 2015, requires, prior to the designation of the Mokelumne River, the NRA to conduct a study analyzing the suitability or non-suitability of the Mokelumne River, its tributaries, or portions of the river for addition to the System.

SB 1199 (Hancock, 2014) would have designated a 37-mile portion of the Mokelumne River in Calaveras and Amador Counties in the Sierra Nevada as a wild and scenic river.  SB 1199 was held in the Assembly Appropriation Committee.

SB 904 (Chesbro), Chapter 545, Statutes of 2004, requires state agencies to protect the free-flowing character and extraordinary values of designated rivers and to clarify that Special Treatment Areas under the Forest Practices Rules are applied to rivers classified as recreational or scenic as well as those classified as wild.

REGISTERED SUPPORT / OPPOSITION:

Support

American Rivers
American Whitewater
Butte Environmental Council
California Water Impact Network
California Sportfishing Protection Alliance
California Outdoors
California Wilderness Coalition
CalTrout
Coast Action Group
Defenders of Wildlife
Foothill Conservancy
Friends of the Eel River

Friends of the River
KIER Associates
Merced River Conservation Committee
Natural Resources Defense Council
Northcoast Environmental Center
Northern California Council International Federation of Fly Fishers
North Fork American River Alliance
Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations
Sacramento River Preservation Trust
Safe Alternatives For Our Forest Environment
Sierra Club California
South Yuba River Citizens League

Two individuals

Opposition

None on file

Analysis Prepared by:   Michael Jarred / NAT. RES. /

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Update on State of Jefferson —

JEFFERSON DECLARATION, Siskiyou County

Mark Baird, spokesman for the State of Jefferson movement, will be sharing information on the “lack of representation” lawsuit with the Siskiyou Co. Supervisors at their meeting on March 21, 2017. Time is 10 a.m.

Attend if you would like to know where the lawsuit stands and what the next step is likely to be.

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Siskiyou Water Users Assoc. sends letter asking for investigations — to CA. Senator Ted Gaines

Siskiyou Water Users Assoc

March 16, 2017

Senator Ted Gaines

Capitol Office State Capitol, Room 3076

Sacramento, CA 95814

Re:     CPUC Commissioner Liane Randolph

          Conflict of Interest

 Dear Senator Gaines,

As you are aware there is a matter of great significance being adjudicated at the CPUC regarding the request of PacifiCorp to have the CPUC authorize the Amended KHSA agreement signed this past year by Governors Brown of California and Oregon respectively and to approve of the transfer of four hydroelectric facilities to a newly formed non- profit corporation, the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC).  PacifiCorp has asked the CPUC to authorize in addition the transfer of approx. $250,000,000 of State funds and a finding that the KRRC is qualified to receive the ratepayer surcharge trust funds as well as the State Bond money. The sole purpose of the KRRC is to destroy these hydroelectric facilities.

The County of Siskiyou Board of Supervisors and the Siskiyou County Water Users have each filed a cross Petition with the CPUC raising some very sensitive and important points including but not limited to the issue of lack of experience and background by KRRC, as well as their lack of financial strength that would insure that the project if carried out and substantial bio remediation and a catastrophic failure result could be ameliorated.   We raise these questions out of a serious concern regarding the protection and security that would be afforded to Siskiyou County and its citizens by such a novice organization.   As you know we have no voice in the process as the agencies involved have deliberately and with malice kept our County officials from being able to have a voice in the destruction to take place.

The question of a conflict of interest on the part of Commissioner Randolph is of great concern and we look to you as our Senator to get to the bottom of it.  Commissioner Randolph has recently been put into an oversight position by Governor Brown apparently to make certain that the ALJ involved is guided in the desired direction.  Commissioner Randolph in the past 30 days was selected to replace Commissioner Clifford Rechtschaffen as oversight on this matter.  Among other issues this is a blatant affront to all parties involved because Commissioner Randolph acted as Deputy Secretary and General Counsel at the California Natural Resources Agency and according to the record was the point person in the agency for its efforts to destroy the Klamath Dams as she was handling their efforts with regard to the Klamath River Restoration and Dam Removal process.  Furthermore it should be pointed out that the California

Natural Resources Agency is a signatory to the Amended KHSA and therefore has a vested interest in seeing that the agreement is carried out including the authorization by the CPUC to transfer PacifiCorp’s interest in the dams to the KRRC.   The Director of the Natural Resources Agency of California in order to carry out their efforts granted without reservation an amount of TWENTY-FIVE MILLION DOLLARS ($25,000,000) on October 12, 2016 as an advance on a TWO HUNDRED FIFTY MILLION DOLLAR ($250,000,000) grant to KRRC.  The grant of funds was signed by Tom Gibson General Counsel to the Agency and by Bryan Cash, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Agency. According to the amended KHSA this was a grant with no “claw back” provision.   The Amended KHSA Page 11 Clause 2 states that “KRRC shall have legal control over the disbursement of funds; disbursements are not contingent on other factors or subject to claw- back ….”.   We have only just learned of the existence of this grant as part of a package application submitted to the FERC indicating that the KRRC was financially capable of carrying out the destruction of the Klamath Dams.  I would note that the FERC has been purposely misled because without the approval of the CPUC the KRRC cannot receive the funds.

Senator Gaines, we request that you carry out an investigation of this matter as soon as possible to prevent a miscarriage of justice by the CPUC.  We would be happy to provide you with additional information as required.  Time is of the essence as this matter is before the CPUC ALJ as this is written.

Sincerely yours

Siskiyou County Water Users Assoc.

Richard Marshall

Richard Marshall

President

cc:      Michael Kobseff

          Chairman Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors

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Siskiyou Sheriff’s Office & Federal and State Law Enforcement Partners Conduct Special Enforcement Operation in Happy Camp

Sheriff Jon Lopey

March 15, 2017

On March 15, 2017 in the early morning hours, the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) coordinated a multi-agency special enforcement operation in the Happy Camp area.  According to Sergeant Jeremiah LaRue, “The purpose of the operation was to conduct probation and parole compliance checks and to execute arrest warrants for people in the Happy Camp area previously non-compliant with mandatory felony and misdemeanor court appearance requirements.  Additionally, registered sex offenders in the area were targeted to ensure they were complying with applicable sex registry laws.”

During the operation, peace officers from SCSO (field, detective, and jail units), Siskiyou County Probation Department (SCPD), the Siskiyou Unified Major Investigation Team (SUMIT), which is made up of Yreka Police Department, SCSO, SCPD, California Department of Justice, Siskiyou County District Attorney’s Office, Weed Police Department, California Alcohol Beverage Control, and California Highway Patrol members; California State Parole, and law enforcement officers from the United States Forest Service (USFS) conducted a series of compliance checks and warrant enforcement operations in the Happy Camp area and in the Somes Bar areas of the county.  Five arrests were made during the successful operation.  During the operation, two suspects fled on foot into wooded areas but have been tentatively identified and additional charges are pending for resisting, obstructing, and delaying a peace officer.  About 20 sites were visited by the multi-agency teams and numerous probation or parole searches, and registered sex offender compliance checks conducted.  The following persons were arrested during the operation:

Ms. Katrina Garcia, 19, Happy Camp, was arrested on a juvenile arrest warrant for failure to comply with probation requirements.

Mr. Rick Lester, 29, Happy Camp, was arrested for a felony arrest warrant – failure to comply with probation requirements; a probation search revealed he was in possession of .5 gram of methamphetamine; Mr. Lester was also found to be in illegal possession of drug paraphernalia, ammunition, and an illegal weapon.

Ms. Kristy Goodwin, 51, of Somes Bar, was arrested for illegal possession of a handgun and ammunition; she was also charged with felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition and booked for a felony violation of probation.

Mr. John Garrison, 31, Somes Bar, was arrested at his residence for a felony warrant for failure to comply with probation requirements and he was further detained for a possible parole-related violation.

Mr. Gene “Gino” Wright, of Happy Camp fled a Somes Bar location on foot and is being sought for various charges.

According to Sheriff Jon Lopey, “I would like to thank the many federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies that participated in this successful compliance and arrest operation, which will serve to make Happy Camp and Somes Bar safer and hold law breakers accountable for their unlawful actions.  Crime in the area often diminishes the quality of life for local residents and victimizes too many innocent people.  We will be conducting more multi-agency operations in the future and we will target areas of the county that have exhibited an increase in property and violent crime reports. During a recent town hall in Happy Camp and through other communications with area residents, it has become clear that additional work needs to be done in the Happy Camp area to address crime problems and we will persist in our efforts to do so.  We are also working with Karuk Tribal authorities, school, and other county agencies to use other resources to address the growing substance abuse problem in the area, which has a major impact on crime and deviancy.  Multi-agency operations of this kind maximize the resources of SCSO and other agencies and exponentially exact a greater impact on crime and puts offenders on notice that we are not going to tolerate illegal criminal activity in this or other areas of the county.”

  Anyone with information about fugitives from justice or crime in your local area is urged to contact your local law enforcement agency or the SCSO’s 24-hour Dispatch Center at (530) 841-2900.  Drug-related crimes may also be directed to SUMIT at (530) 842-8131.”

 

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News from Yreka Tea Party Patriots

TEA Party

Hi Everyone,

We are back on schedule with our tea party meetings on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays.  In case you missed this Tuesday, see enclosed youtube of the video. It was only 14 minutes long and well worth the time to watch it. Very enlightening.  Also see attached handouts which we gave out at the meeting.

Next Tea Party meeting will be March 28th with Kermith Walters, Superintendent of schools to talk about how Erin’s law is being implemented in the schools.  We will also have DVDs available regarding Erin’s law. I have also enclosed the youtube address for that DVD so you can share it with your online friends and family. Feel free to post them on  your facebook pages.

https://vimeo.com/8223000  by the numbers…gum balls  14 min. on legal immigration.

Presented by immigration author/journalist Roy Beck

Learn More http://www.NumbersUSA.org
NumbersUSA Education & Research Foundation is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that favors an environmentally sustainable and economically just America and seeks to educate the public about the effects of high levels of immigration on U.S. overpopulation, the environment, jobs, and wages. We use government data to conduct research on the impacts of U.S. population growth, consumption, sprawl, and current levels of immigration and educate the public, opinion leaders and policy makers on the results of those and other studies.

 “Ending the Nightmare: Protecting Kids from Sex Abuse”, CBN News https://youtu.be/Z57ZpvQovk4   6 minutes.

Louise

 

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Zinke: Interior Department in the ‘energy business’

Dept. of INTERIOR
1 Comment

Court sides with Auburn tribe over former chairwoman’s ouster

Lawsuits, Tribes

Sac bee.com

The ruling by the United States 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, responding to a bitter 2013 clash in one of California’s wealthiest casino tribes and ensuing litigation, effectively rejected claims that the tribe “imposed unlawful restraints” on the “liberty” of Tavares and three other members by cutting off their income and banning them from United Auburn properties.

In October, 2013, Tavares and the other members brought legal action, filed in U.S. District Court in Sacramento as a writ of habeas corpus under the 1968 Indian Civil Rights Act. She charged that the tribal council for the United Auburn Indian Community wrongly denied her $40,000 a month in benefits and bonuses, based on casino profits, and illegally banished her for 10 years.

Tavares was stripped of payments for 3 1/2 years, starting in 2011, reduced by the tribe from an original sanction of four years. The others were denied payments of $30,000 and up for five months and given a two-year banishment, a punishment since expired.

Tavares and the other plaintiffs – Dolly Suehead, Barbara Suehead and Donna Caesar – were part of an unsuccessful recall effort against five tribal council members that focused on the dissidents’ protests over what they charged were excessive legal fees paid to the firm of tribal attorney Howard Dickstein. The lawyer contended he had provided “a phenomenal net benefit to the tribe.”

The 9th Circuit upheld a district court ruling that rejected the Tavares’ faction’s habeas corpus claim on grounds that federal courts lacked authority to intervene in internal tribal politics.

“We ground our opinion in two fundamental principles in the Indian law canon – tribal sovereignty and congressional primacy in Indian affairs,” wrote Judge M. Margaret McKeown in the court’s decision. “We have long recognized that Indian tribes are ‘distinct, independent communities, retaining their original natural rights.’ 

In a partial dissent, Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw supported the ruling that the court couldn’t intervene by overturning the tribe’s financial sanctions against the members. But Wardlaw wrote that United Auburn’s continuing 10-year-banishment order against Tavares “severely restrains her liberty and constitutes ‘detention’ under the Indian Civil Rights Act” and, thus can be overturned by the courts.

“Taveras presents us with precisely the kind of case over which Congress intended to establish federal jurisdiction: having exercised her right to free expression,” Wardlow wrote, adding “Tavares suffered retaliation … in the form of ‘severe restrains on individual liberty’ not shared by other members of her tribe.”

According to court documents, Tavares and the other members were sanctioned for claims in their recall petition that raised “a litany of allegations” against tribal council members, including ‘financial mismanagement, retaliation, electoral irregularity (and) denial of due process.’ 

The tribal council ruling, which banned the members from tribal events, offices and properties other than the members’ own homes, was also imposed because the tribal government ruled the Taveres’ faction wrongfully took its grievances to the news media, including The Sacramento Bee in “a sensationalized publicity stunt.”

Tavares served as chairwoman of the tribe for many years. She led the group when it opened its wildly successful casino on Highway 65 in 2003.

Read it here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/article138501293.html#storylink=cpy

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Older yet faster, record-setting Iditarod champ Mitch Seavey schools a talented field

Enjoy

adn.com

March 14, 2017

Author:

NOME — Mitch Seavey just had the race of his life.

The 57-year-old musher from Sterling won the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race at 3:40 p.m. Tuesday, shattering the speed record by nearly eight hours to steal the title of fastest Iditarod musher ever from his much-younger son, Dallas.

Mitch remains the race’s oldest champion and has notched three wins in 13 years, his last in 2013 at age 53.

“Fifty-seven used to be old, and it’s not anymore. I’m just letting you know that,” Seavey said at a press conference after the race, his statement met by applause in the crowded building near the finish line.

‘Old guys rule’

In 4-degree temperatures Tuesday, Seavey pulled under the burled arch on Nome’s snowy Front Street with a team of 11 dogs, led by 4-year-old Pilot and 5-year-old Crisp.

Crowds lined the street, cheering on the team and taking photographs. One person held a sign that read, “Old guys rule.”

Seavey, in a puffy, red parka with a thick ruff, got off his sled and walked to the front of his team, praising the sled dogs along the way.

“Good dogs,” he told them, icicles stuck to his mustache. “Good dogs.”

He gave each dog a snack and then talked about the teamwork that allowed him to demolish the race record, arriving to Nome in 8 days, 3 hours, 40 minutes to win an exceptionally fast race. (Dallas set the prior record at age 29 in 2016 at 8 days, 11 hours, 20 minutes.)

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” Mitch Seavey said of his team’s speed throughout the race, which started March 6, in Fairbanks, and featured a temperature swing of at least 70 degrees, with lows reaching 40 and 50 below in its early days.

A month before the Iditarod began, race officials said they planned to move the official start north, from Willow to Fairbanks. The course out of Fairbanks includes more running on frozen rivers in comparison to the Willow route that sends mushers over the Alaska Range.

But, Seavey said he didn’t know if the course necessarily contributed to the fast race.

“I’m not sure whether it’s slower to go a couple hundred miles on the Yukon at 50 below or take a little hop over the Alaska Range,” he said. Still, he gave the trail the grade of “A-minus.”

‘Let ’em roll’

Throughout much of the 1,000-mile course, Seavey’s team held its speed, allowing him to pull away from the other frontrunners.

“They love speed,” Seavey said of his sled dogs. “I think it frustrated them to go too slow, so I just let ’em roll. It was scary because I’ve never gone that far that fast ever, but that’s what they wanted to do and maybe it’s a new chapter.”

Seavey’s team recorded runs that averaged 10 and 11 mph between some checkpoints and the separation he built over other racers gave him the flexibility to bank generous rest for his dogs, and himself, as they moved up the Norton Sound coast in the race’s final days.

“They only know one thing and that’s 9.5 to 10 mph and they hit their feet, and they hit their speed and that’s what they do. And they trusted me to stop them when they needed to be stopped, and feed them, and I did that, and they gave me all they could. But I guarantee they’re tired now,” said the new champion.

https://www.adn.com/outdoors-adventure/iditarod/2017/03/14/at-age-57-mitch-seavey-wins-iditarod-as-its-fastest-and-oldest-champion/

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Liz Writes Life 3-14-17

Liz Writes Life

March 14, 2017

Liz Writes Life

During the last two weeks, I have mentioned that Western Rivers Conservancy is considering purchasing the Timbervest properties on the west and south edges of Scott Valley. I learned from Ray Haupt, Dist. 5 Siskiyou Co. Supervisor, and then Peter Colby, who is the spokesman for the conservancy, that the only properties the conservancy is interested in are at the south end of Scott Valley. They are specifically the Bouvier property located in the South Fork of the Scott River–Cecilville Road area and an eastern piece on Scott Mountain.

I had forgotten that Timbervest is willing to sell parcels of land. Apparently, it isn’t an all-in-one-lump land sale. I believe a few properties have been purchased in the northern end of the valley — not by a conservancy. Ray said that no bidders were successful in the first go-round in the area below Big Meadows. I am sorry for any confusion.

Garden

Last week, we decided to pull-up the five onions and found they were bunching onions. These must have grown from seed that I planted last year. They made it through the cold winter without having extra mulch put on them for protection. So that is good to know. Jack decided to dig up the last three feet of carrots. About half of them were in good shape, so he washed them up and brought them in the house. Some were too large and pithy, so he chopped those up with the shovel and left them for mulch.

The daffys are starting to bloom and actually needed a sip of water yesterday, because of our warm weather. I also gave some water to the violets and blue and pink lungwort that is starting to bloom.

Still didn’t get the lettuces or spinach planted. Maybe this week!

Snow survey

The U.S. Forest Service employees conducted the March 1st snowpack survey and found the snow was well above average in the mountains to the south and west of Scott Valley. More good news is that the snowpack is even denser than it was Feb. 1st.

I’ll mention the highest ones: Middle Boulder 3, established in 1948 at the 6,200 foot elevation, saw 84.5 inches of snow with an average of 60 inches making an historic average of 141 percent.

Boasting the highest percentage at 148 of historic average was Scott Mt. at 75.5 inches, where the average is 51.1 inches at the 5,900 foot elevation.

Swampy John, above Etna on Salmon Mt., is holding well at 126 percent of historical average with 89.5 inches over the average of 71 inches.

At the state level, California snow surveyors in the Sierra Nevada say the snowpack is close to setting records. Snow measured extremely high at 185 percent of the historical average. Hum, hopefully Gov. Jerry Brown will declare the five-year drought is over!

Forestry

Ray Haupt, and Lisa Nixon, Dist. 1 Siskiyou Co. Supervisor, recently attended a meeting with a number of other rural county supervisors as part of the Sustainable Forest Action Coalition. The coalition is impressive as it is focusing on social-economic problems (and solutions) caused by the loss of our major rural resource industry – timber harvest. The website is worth checking out: sfacoaliton.com.

I know Ray is a huge supporter of active forest management to improve forest health, so I asked Lisa what she thought of the meeting. She said the group is currently assembling data relating to the socio-economic effects of forest management plans and projects; and vigorously advocating the development and implementation of forest management work.

Lisa said the data on forest-dependent communities is staggering. Rural livelihoods that relied on timber harvest were demolished. She also mentioned that recreation and eco-tourism has not even begun to fill the economic void. I agree as I heard this mantra throughout the 1990s and it never materialized. I also agree with Lisa that “humankind is, after all, part of the food chain, and I believe we are at the top. We deserve at least some consideration.” Way to go, Lisa!

Sounds like involvement in this coalition is a really good thing. Thank you Lisa and Ray for advocating for socio-economic justice for rural communities.

POW

Elizabeth Nielsen, Siskiyou Co. Natural Resources Specialist, will be speaking at the Scott Valley Protect Our Water meeting on Thurs., March 23, 2017 at the Fort Jones Community Center. Time is 7 p.m. Elizabeth is up-to-her-neck in the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, called SGMA, that was signed into CA. law in 2014. It requires groundwater resources to be managed by local agencies throughout California. The local agencies are to develop and implement Groundwater Sustainability Plans by 2022, but the first deadline for a study plan is June of this year. Yep, Elizabeth is hustling.

She told me there are four groundwater basins in Siskiyou County that are subject to SGMA, the Shasta, Scott and Butte Valley Basins, and the Tule Lake Subbasin. The Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors and Flood Control District have taken active roles to meet the requirements of SGMA and ensure that these four groundwater basins are managed on a local level with input and support from the citizens of Siskiyou County, who depend on this vital resource.

To really get a good understanding of SGMA and how it will affect you, please attend the Protect Our Water meeting. Ray will be there to answer SGMA questions and will also discuss the Scott Valley Plan pertaining to JH Guest Ranch expansion and the Timbervest and (possible) conservancy purchase.

Finicum

Guess what? Five FBI agents are being investigated for lying and covering-up about the LaVoy Finicum shooting. There were additional bullets fired that were not included in the original reported count. Oops! The saga continues.

The Iditarod Sled Dog Race is underway. Check it out at: Alaska Dispatch News.com or Pie N Politics.com

Liz Bowen is a native of Siskiyou Co. and lives near Callahan. Call her at 530-467-3515.

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