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Browsing the archives for the Scott River & Valley category.

CA Natural Resources pushes, again, for control over Siskiyou rivers

California Rivers, California water, Klamath River & Dams, Salmon and fish, Scott River & Valley, Siskiyou County, State gov

PNP comment: Look at the out-of-area dictators, who want to tell Siskiyou County and its residents how we should live. — Editor Liz Bowen

Additional comment by Rex Cozallio, landowner below Irongate dam near Hornbrook, CA:

I was extremely agitated and disheartened to become aware of this proposition that would severely impact our region submitted in February by a non resident assemblywoman  out of GLENDALE, California ‘sponsored’ (paid for) by ‘Friends of the River’, and ‘supported’ by 23 more profiting ‘non-profits’ and NO OPPOSITION!  This relentless onslaught, mounting countless paid for attacks with the ever-expanding objective of effectively confiscating vested private and public property without compensation or  impacted regional input, must end.  Quickly and quietly shoved through lobbied ‘legislative process’, their obvious and successful theory is that a certain portion will sneak through before sufficient public awareness, further empowering the unelected policy-driven bureaucratic power base permitting public oppression and the further social/economic division of classes.  This ‘provision’ adds an incredible, ridiculous, and impossible-to-survive complete and unimpeded REWILDING of the affected regional rivers, particularly the Klamath, Scott, and Shasta.  It not only prescribes unrestricted ‘natural’ accretion and avulsion of riparian property, it discretionarily restricts ANY use of riparian areas within a QUARTER OF A MILE of EACH side of the rivers.

In searching for the legislation last night, the ONLY reference I could find that wasn’t an unrelated 2013 Bill of the same number, was the sponsoring ‘Friends of the River’ website.  A link within that led to the Assembly woman’s promotional page.  From multiple calls I found out the Bill I heard about last night is in Natural Resource committee ‘hearings’ TODAY.  The only other ‘opportunity’ to publically ‘respond’ will be at the next as yet unscheduled or posted Administrative/Budgetary hearing.

After talking to the ‘legislative analyst’ Michael Jered about the unnotified and most impacted regions in opposition, I was admonished on several fronts.  Unequivocally saying that failing to access the information was my and the local representatives’ fault since it was submitted in February, and that I should take up any complaints with them, he graciously allowed that I may write a letter of opposition which he could ‘place in the file’, even though it would not be acknowledged, but would be ‘available’ in the event someone ‘wanted to read it’.

He also said I could have certainly gone to Sacramento to testify to the Committee ‘if I wanted’, but of course that ‘would not be possible for today’ and any failure to go to legis.ca.gov to inform myself was ‘my problem’, and that is ‘just the way the process works’.

Telling him it did not show up on a search of that site, he assured me that it was there and I just wasn’t doing it right.  Insisting I was wrong, he went to the legis site and said ‘just look at the 2015-2016 legislation’,  at which point he hesitated and said ‘oh, I guess they haven’t posted the years legislation yet’ (in March, and this is the first he knew?).

If you wish to call him, his number is 916-319-2092, but it appears the only way to impact the progression now is to actively push to somehow track it AFTER it no doubt passes through Committee today, the point at which we would likely have been the most able to rescind.

All the Best,

Rex Cozzalio

 

CA ab975..please read time sensitive, hearing date March 20th

Date of Hearing: March 20, 2017

ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES

Cristina Garcia, Chair

ABPCA Bill Id:AB 975 (

Author:Friedman) – As Introduced Ver:February 16, 2017

SUBJECT:  Natural resources:  wild and scenic rivers

SUMMARY:  Adds “historical, cultural, geological, ecological, hydrological (i.e., unique source, direction, or quantity of water flows), botanical or other values” to the values that certain rivers possess and the state should preserve.  Expands the area protected in the Wild and Scenic Rivers System (System) from immediately adjacent to the river segment to within a quarter mile of the river.

EXISTING LAW, pursuant to the California Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Act):

  • Declares that it is the policy of the state that certain rivers that possess extraordinary scenic, recreational, fishery, or wildlife values be preserved in their “free-flowing” state, together with their immediate environments, for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the state. Declares that such use of these rivers is the highest and most beneficial use and is a reasonable and beneficial use of water.

  • Defines “free-flowing” as existing or flowing without artificial impoundment, diversion, or other modification of the river. (The presence of low dams, diversion works, and other minor structures does not automatically bar a river’s inclusion within the System.)

  • Requires that those rivers or segments of rivers included in the System be classified as one of the following:

    1. Wild rivers, which are those rivers or segments of rivers that are free of impoundments and generally inaccessible except by trail, with watersheds or shorelines essentially primitive and waters unpolluted;

  1. Scenic rivers, which are those rivers or segments of rivers that are free of impoundments, with shorelines or watersheds still largely primitive and shorelines largely undeveloped but accessible in places by roads; or

  1. Recreational rivers, which are those rivers or segments of rivers that are readily accessible by road or railroad, may have some development along their shorelines, and may have undergone some impoundment or diversion in the past.

  • Designates several California rivers and segments thereof as components of the System.

  • Requires the Natural Resources Agency (NRA) to be responsible for coordinating the activities of state agencies whose activities affect the rivers in the System with those of other state, local, and federal agencies with jurisdiction over matters that may affect the rivers.

FISCAL EFFECT:  Unknown

 

COMMENTS:

  • Author’s statement:

AB 975 brings the California Wild and Scenic Rivers System more in line with the federal system, improving state management of rivers that enjoy dual state-federal designation, and allowing for the protection of existing and future state rivers that possess additional values beyond those currently mentioned in the Act.

  • The Act. The Act was passed in 1972 to preserve designated rivers possessing extraordinary scenic, recreation, fishery, or wildlife values.  With its initial passage, the System protected segments of the Smith River and tributaries, Klamath River and tributaries, Scott River, Salmon River, Trinity River, Eel River, Van Duzen River, and American River.  The System was subsequently expanded by the Legislature to include the East Carson and West Walker Rivers in 1989, the South Yuba River in 1999, the Albion River and Gualala Rivers in 2003, and Cache Creek in 2005.  In addition, segments of the McCloud River, Deer Creek, and Mill Creek were protected under the Act in 1989 and 1995 respectively, although these segments were not formally designated as components of the System.

The Act provides a number of legal protections for rivers included within the System, beginning with the following legislative declaration:

It is the policy of the State of California that certain rivers which possess extraordinary scenic, recreational, fishery, or wildlife values shall be preserved in their free-flowing state, together with their immediate environments, for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the state.  The Legislature declares that such use of these rivers is the highest and most beneficial use and is a reasonable and beneficial use of water within the meaning of Section 2 of Article X of the California Constitution.

The Act defines “free-flowing” as “existing or flowing without artificial impoundment, diversion, or other modification of the river.”  The existence of minor structures, or even major dams located upstream or downstream of a specific segment, does not preclude a river from designation.  Several rivers, such as the Klamath, Trinity, Eel, and Lower American, are included in the System despite substantial flow modifications by existing upstream dams and impoundments.

No dam, reservoir, diversion, or other water impoundment facility may be constructed on any river segment included in the System.  However, there are exemptions, which include temporary flood storage facilities on the Eel River and temporary recreational impoundments on river segments with a history of such impoundments.  NRA cannot authorize these temporary recreational impoundments without first making a number of findings.

A cornerstone of the Act is the non-degradation clause, which prohibits new projects and activities from adversely affecting the free-flowing condition and natural character of river segments included in the System.

The Act was patterned after the 1968 National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Federal Act).  The state and federal Acts share similar criteria and definitions in regard to the purpose of protecting rivers, the identification of free flowing rivers and extraordinary or outstanding values suitable for protection, establishing a study process to include rivers in the system, as well as an identical classification system.  The primary purpose of both the state and federal Acts is to prohibit new water impoundments on designated rivers.

  • Consistency with the Federal Act. The state Act differs from the Federal Act in that it does not recognize as many river values.  The additional values in the Federal Act include historical, cultural, geologic, and “other similar” values.  Federal agencies have interpreted “similar” values to include ecological, botanical, and hydrological.  When NRA studied the East Carson and West Walker Rivers they found them to have extraordinary hydrological values.  However, that value is not in the Act.  AB 975 adds the additional values considered by Federal agencies, but it also adds “other” values.  This differs from the Federal Act because it is vague compared to “other similar” values.  The author and committee may wish to consider amending the bill to reflect the Federal Act by using “other similar” values.

The Federal Act also creates protections within a quarter mile of a river in the system.  The state Act defines immediate environments to be immediately adjacent to the river, and defines river to include up to the first line of permanently established riparian vegetation.  AB 975 would align the state Act with the Federal Act by defining immediate environments to include within quarter mile of segments of the river.  This change would have the effect of directing state and local governments to act in a manner that protects the additional immediate environment.  In addition, AB 975 would provide more consistent direction for rivers in the federal System that the state manages.

  • Previous legislation.

AB 142 (Bigelow), Chapter 661, Statutes of 2015, requires, prior to the designation of the Mokelumne River, the NRA to conduct a study analyzing the suitability or non-suitability of the Mokelumne River, its tributaries, or portions of the river for addition to the System.

SB 1199 (Hancock, 2014) would have designated a 37-mile portion of the Mokelumne River in Calaveras and Amador Counties in the Sierra Nevada as a wild and scenic river.  SB 1199 was held in the Assembly Appropriation Committee.

SB 904 (Chesbro), Chapter 545, Statutes of 2004, requires state agencies to protect the free-flowing character and extraordinary values of designated rivers and to clarify that Special Treatment Areas under the Forest Practices Rules are applied to rivers classified as recreational or scenic as well as those classified as wild.

REGISTERED SUPPORT / OPPOSITION:

Support

American Rivers
American Whitewater
Butte Environmental Council
California Water Impact Network
California Sportfishing Protection Alliance
California Outdoors
California Wilderness Coalition
CalTrout
Coast Action Group
Defenders of Wildlife
Foothill Conservancy
Friends of the Eel River

Friends of the River
KIER Associates
Merced River Conservation Committee
Natural Resources Defense Council
Northcoast Environmental Center
Northern California Council International Federation of Fly Fishers
North Fork American River Alliance
Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations
Sacramento River Preservation Trust
Safe Alternatives For Our Forest Environment
Sierra Club California
South Yuba River Citizens League

Two individuals

Opposition

None on file

Analysis Prepared by:   Michael Jarred / NAT. RES. /

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Siskiyou Co: Irrigation district participates in groundwater recharge program

Agriculture - California, Scott River & Valley, Water rights, Water, Resources & Quality

PNP comment: Farmers have known for 100 years that utilizing irrigation ditches in the off-season helps recharge the groundwater table. Greenies do not like this type of program, because their goal is to destroy the environment. — Editor Liz Bowen

 

By Damon Arthur of the Redding Record Searchlight

A Siskiyou County irrigation district is the first water agency in the state to take part in a new groundwater recharge program.

Under the program, the Scott Valley Irrigation District can divert 5,400 acre-feet of water from the Scott River during the rainy season when the river is running high. The district can divert water from the river until March 31.

The district uses the water to flood select areas in the valley, where it can then percolate into the ground and recharge the amount of water stored underground.

Some sections of the Scott River dry up during the summer and fall. State and local officials hope raising the water table in the valley will mean the river will continue to flow rather than dry up during the summer.

More water in the river should benefit chinook and coho salmon that spawn in the river, according to the California Water Board.

“We have been talking about doing this kind of thing for a long time,” said Jim Morris, a board member for the district.

MORE

http://www.redding.com/news/local/irrigation-district-participates-in-groundwater-recharge-program-2c9c5cb1-9b92-4cb0-e053-0100007ffdc-370299151.html?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_content=&utm_campaign=TopHeadlines_Newsletter

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Klamath Basin: Water pact crumbles in Congress after years of work

Agriculture, Agriculture - California, California water, Endangered Species Act, Federal gov & land grabs, KBRA or KHSA, Klamath County, Klamath River & Dams, Oregon governments, Property rights, Salmon and fish, Scott River & Valley, Shasta River, Siskiyou County, State gov, Threats to agriculture, Tribes

PNP comment: Destruction of the four hydro-electric Klamath dams and the resulting affect it would have on water rights in Oregon and California should have never been part of the KBRA. The Counties of Siskiyou and Oregon in a Bi-state Alliance asked that Klamath dam removal be taken out of the KBRA, but the stakeholders would have nothing to do with it. Demolition of Klamath dams will set a precedent that Congress was not willing to do and, more importantly, had nothing to do with irrigation in the Klamath Project as they store their water as part of the “reclamation” project. Please understand that the KBRA could have moved forward, but Klamath dam removal should not have been part of the agreement. It is environmentally ludicrous to take out the Klamath dams. The dams provide needed flood control, summer water flow sustainability for fish; and grow millions of salmon through the Irongate Fish Hatchery. — Editor Liz Bowen

By Jeff Mapes | The Oregonian/OregonLive

on December 19, 2015 at 10:00 AM, updated December 19, 2015 at 10:02 AM

For years, the Klamath Basin water agreement was a feel-good story about racial reconciliation, environmental recovery and the power of working together.

It was an uplifting sequel to the huge protests by farmers during an irrigation shutoff in 2001 and the death of thousands of salmon in the overheated waters of the Klamath River a year later.

After years of negotiation, ranchers, farmers and tribes in the Klamath Basin on the border of Oregon and California reached a water-sharing agreement that included the bold step of removing four aged dams on the Klamath River to restore the health of one of the West’s main salmon-producing waterways.

It became clear this week, however, that there won’t be any storybook ending, at least that anyone can see now.

Congress once again failed to pass legislation implementing the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement and its associated pacts. The agreement is set to expire Jan. 1, and nobody’s quite sure what’s going to happen next.

“We collectively as a society missed an opportunity here, and I don’t think we’ll have it again,” said Greg Addington of the Klamath Water Users Association, one of the main players in the saga. “What it means for us in a nutshell is more continued uncertainty.”

The inspiring tale that attracted so much attention masked the fact that not everyone was singing Kumbaya. The agreement never sold well either in solidly Republican Klamath County or on the California side of the border, where the idea of removing dams and tilting the scale toward environmental and tribal purposes was regarded suspiciously.

“They try to say the community is for it, and it’s not true at all,” said Klamath County Chairman Tom Mallams, noting that almost all successful candidates in the area run against the agreement.

Legislation implementing the basin agreement has languished in Congress in the years since Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski and California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger staged a celebratory signing in Oregon’s Capitol in 2010.

Among western Republicans, the idea of removing the dams has been viewed with great suspicion, even though the aged structures are relatively small hydroelectric producers, aren’t used for irrigation and have major fish-passage problems. PacifiCorp, which owns the dams, has agreed to remove them instead of going through the uncertainty and huge expense of relicensing them.

But congressional critics have long fretted that it could create a precedent for fulfilling environmentalist fantasies for widespread dam removal in the West.

Republican Rep. Greg Walden, who represents the Oregon side of the basin, kept a careful distance from the agreement, particularly when it came to dam removal. In the last year, he softened his rhetoric about removing dams and has been negotiating with Oregon’s two senators, Democrats Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, on legislation to move the agreement forward.

But those talks came to an end two weeks ago after Walden unveiled a legislative draft that left out dam removal and called for turning over 100,000 acres of federal land to Klamath County and to California’s Siskiyou County.

Walden, suggesting that the dams could potentially be taken out through the regulatory process, said he was trying to figure out a creative way to build support for the agreement among his fellow Republicans.

In the short run, Walden’s proposal appeared to drive away Wyden and Merkley. They said the idea of turning federal forests over to the counties was a nonstarter in the Senate. The omnibus spending bill — once seen as a potential vehicle for Klamath Basin language – passed Friday, and Congress went home for holidays.

“We’re going to continue to work to find a solution that works for the people in the basin and that can be passed in the House and signed into law,” said Walden spokesman Andrew Malcolm. “We’re looking for a viable resolution.”

The senators released their own statement Friday, saying they hope they can make progress when Congress returns next month – but it’s clear they expect Walden to drop his more controversial ideas if anything is going to happen.

“We are hopeful that a path forward can still be found,” the senators said, “if there is an immediate commitment to put aside unnecessary and unrelated policy disputes and instead work toward legislative action first thing in January on an earnest attempt to implement the locally developed agreements.”

The path is getting rockier. One of the three tribes that signed the agreement – the Yuroks in California – have backed away from it, and Addington said some of the groups on the farm side are starting to peel away as well.

A PacifiCorp official told the Capitol Press, an agricultural newspaper, that the company will now seek to relicense its dams. Conversely, WaterWatch, a Portland-based environmental group that never supported the agreement, argues the dams can’t be brought up to modern standards and that it hopes to force their removal through the federal regulatory process.

Meanwhile, Addington said irrigators will probably have to unleash their lawyers to go into court to fight the Klamath Tribes over water rights in the upper basin. The tribes won a 2013 ruling that they hold the superior water rights, but there are still avenues for appeal.

Don Gentry, the Klamath tribal chairman, agreed that more litigation looms.

“We’re going to be basically back in court with one another,” Gentry said, “and that’s a difficult thing. But we have to represent our interests as best we can.”

Gentry noted that many of his tribal members are feeling restless. While they’ve lived within the terms of the agreement for five years, “we haven’t gotten any closer to all the things we want.”

The various signatories to the agreement are planning a conference call Dec. 28 to talk over what might happen next. Addington and Gentry say they hope the good will the signatories have built up over the years while help them continue to negotiate.

One thing everyone hopes for is a good water year to help smooth over conflicts.

In the meantime, Gentry said, supporters of the Klamath agreement are feeling shell-shocked.

“As one person said today,” he explained in a telephone interview, “we’re still going through the stages of grief.”

–Jeff Mapes

jmapes@oregonian.com

503-221-8209

http://www.oregonlive.com/mapes/index.ssf/2015/12/klamath_basin_water_pact_crumb.html#incart_email

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Photos from Scott River flooding at South end of Scott Valley on 2-7-15

Air, Climate & Weather, cattle, Photos, Ranch life, Scott River & Valley

2-Flood breaking thru_edited-1

Water breaking through at the North end of the dredger tailings.

2-Flood house cattle_edited-1

House on far right is flooded by Scott River on 2-7-15. Cattle were caught off-guard overnight by the rising waters and were stranded on a small rise by the barn in the back.

2-Flood cattle 2-7-15_edited-1

By the end of Saturday, rancher Rick Barnes was able to get his cattle moved to safety away from the rising waters.

2-Flood dredger camp 2-7-15_edited-1

This is the lower part of the dredger tailings, where the Scott River broke through and was rushing down the West side, instead of the typical East side.

2-Flood tree in river 2-7-15_edited-1

One of many downed trees from the high winds Thursday night in the Scott River near Callahan. The old steel historic Callahan Bridge is in the distance. Photo taken 2-7-15.

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NOTICE OF TEMPORARY LIFTING OF CURTAILMENTS FOR DIVERSIONS SPECIFIED IN THE SCOTT RIVER ADJUDICATION IN THE SCOTT RIVER WATERSHED

Agriculture - California, Scott River & Valley, State gov, Water rights, Water, Resources & Quality, Watermaster Service

This is a message from the State Water Resources Control Board.

The State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) is temporarily lifting the water right curtailment for junior priority class rights in the Scott River watershed beginning on December 3 at 10:00 am continuing until further notice. The temporary authorization for diversion is based on this week’s rain event and associated projected runoff in excess of the flows required to satisfy senior priority class rights.

The junior priority class rights are identified as either: (1) a Priority 2 Class Right in Schedule D-4 of the Decree, (2) a Post-1914 Appropriative Right in Schedule E of the Decree, or (3) a “Surplus Class” right in the Decree.

During this diversion opportunity, you must comply with all terms and conditions of your water right, especially season of diversion and bypass conditions. You should keep a record of your diversions since such diversions are still subject to prior rights. Any diversion in violation of terms and conditions or of these notices is subject to enforcement.

The State Water Board will be monitoring weather forecasts and stream gages to determine if the temporary diversion opportunity should continue. Please monitor your email and our website for further updates on when diversions are authorized, and when curtailments are in place. If an email list notice is issued on the weekend, the website will not be updated until the following Monday due to service limitations.

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Production Assistant Training for Television and Film workshop will be held 11-23-14

Scott River & Valley

This Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, the Scott Valley Film Coalition is offering a professional training workshop that will create a local workforce to support one-M and television productions in Siskiyou County. The workshop is from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Resource & Event Center in Fort Jones – across from the fort.
This first workshop is designed for entry-level training in production assistance – one of the most common jobs hired by companies, when on location.
Topics will include understanding call sheets, walkie etiquette, set protocols and several practical skills a production assistant may be asked to do or perform. Successful completion of the class allows you to become part of the Coalition’s Production Resource Catalogue that will be made available to producers and location scouts for potential job opportunities.
This class will be taught by Megan Peterson, who has over 10 years experience in the field for companies ranging from National Geographic to Travel Channel to Sundance Channel. Please join us!
To enroll, please email info@scottvalley¬lm.org to hold your spot.
Cost is normally $145, but the Scott Valley Film Coalition is underwriting the majority of the cost for Siskiyou County residents, which is only $10. For more info, call 530-468-2888.
# # #

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Water Quality Control Board will hold meeting in Siskiyou 10-8-14

Scott River & Valley, Shasta River, State gov, Water, Resources & Quality

The North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board is holding its monthly meeting in Siskiyou County this Wednesday.

It will be held at the Mount Shasta Fish Hatchery Museum at 1 North Old Stage Road in Mount Shasta.

Starts at 9 a.m.

Item # 6 will be just before lunch or more likely right after lunch around 1 p.m. This one may get into the Shasta and Scott Rivers and water flow. It would be a good time for those who really understand the rivers — land owners, farmers and ranchers — to show up and voice your concerns over the presentation.

— Editor Liz Bowen

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Scott River and saving coho made ABC’s Nightline

Agriculture - California, Air, Climate & Weather, California Rivers, California water, Dept. Fish & Game, Endangered Species Act, Salmon and fish, Scott River & Valley

Hi All ,

Below is a link to the ABC Nightline telecast that aired on Friday night about the coho rescue efforts this summer. It’s a fair representation, considering all the aspects that have gone into this. I would have liked a bigger nod to the landowners, because none of this is possible without their willingness, but they know we all greatly appreciate the role they played.

The rescue effort continues, though it’s mostly monitoring at this point. Let’s hope we don’t have to move anymore fish.

Have a good week,

Preston Harris, rancher in Scott Valley

 

http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/video/nightline-californias-extreme-drought-threatens-thousands-fish-25188223

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California: Protect Groundwater Rights

Agriculture - California, California water, Property rights, Ranch life, Scott River & Valley, State gov, Threats to agriculture, Water rights

Farm Team Action Alert

Stop AB 1739 & SB 1168 Take Action!

Protect Groundwater Rights

AB 1739 (Dickinson, D-Sacramento) and SB 1168 (Pavley, D-Agoura Hills), two groundwater management bills, began as a rush to solve groundwater management issues for basins in overdraft during the crisis of our current drought, but have now morphed into a significant water grab.

The two recently amended and identical bills have significant, negative impacts on:

• Groundwater rights
• Adjudicated areas already in existence
• Adjudications in the future
• Allocation of groundwater for environmental and habitat purposes
• New authorities for local districts, including a new fee authority

Farm Bureau agrees groundwater management is best accomplished at the local or regional level; however, there are very real concerns about this attempt to pass groundwater management policy with all the related complexities in the last few weeks of this legislative session. Poorly thought through policy will only devalue land and result in litigation, but will also impact jobs, county tax rolls and local economies.

It is imperative that decision-makers consider all the impacts any groundwater policy will have on those who live, work and rely on our agricultural landscape.

Act today to stop AB 1739 & SB 1168!

The Time has come for 51 — the State of Jefferson, splitting from California!

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Flight harassment by DFG Wardens on 5-6-14

Agriculture - California, CORRUPTION, Dept. Fish & Game, Jefferson News Service, KSYC radio, Mark Baird, Over-regulations, POW, Property rights, PROTESTS, Salmon and fish, Scott River & Valley, Sheriff Jon Lopey, Siskiyou County, State gov, Threats to agriculture, Water rights, Water, Resources & Quality

News in Jefferson Country   

May 8, 2014

Broadcast on Buffalo Broadcasting KSYC 103.9 FM and KSIZ 102.3 FM, Yreka, CA.

 

News in Jefferson County from Pie N Politics.com Editor Liz Bowen: Wardens from the California Department of Fish and Game are stirring up concern in Scott Valley.

On Tuesday, May 6th, 2014, Quartz Valley rancher, John Menke, confronted two game wardens for buzzing his cattle. Menke was in his field, when a low-flying helicopter circled not once, but twice, which harassesd his cattle. Menke followed the helicopter to the Scott Valley Airport, where he discussed the threatening behavior with DFG Wardens Steve McDonald and Dan Beck.

McDonald reported to Menke that he is now the head Game Warden for the Siskiyou area and that Dan Beck works for him handling Quartz Valley.

Warden McDonald admitted they were surveying the creeks and irrigation diversions for possible 1600 violations. A 1600 permit is needed if an irrigator needs to improve a streambed for diversion of water into an irrigation ditch.

Menke reports that several years ago, Warden McDonald told him that he was actually looking forward to summer low-stream flows, expecting to be able to cite ranchers for Endangered Specie Act perceived threats against juvenile coho salmon.

Mark Baird, vice-president of Scott Valley Protect Our Water, is disgusted with Warden McDonald’s domineering behavior.

Baird, who is a pilot, said that it is illegal, unprofessional and unethical to fly beneath FAA minimums that may affect lives or property. “This is another example of Warden McDonald and his agency acting illegally in order to persecute local families growing food and fiber for this nation,” said Baird, who encourages all landowners to become vigilant against the over-bearing behavior of DFG.

Baird said to carry a camera or a recorder to document suspicious DFG activities and be sure to report violations to Protect Our Water and the sheriff’s office – EVERY TIME they are observed.

Baird welcomes phone calls as does Pow President Andrew Hurlimann, Vice-President Liz Bowen and Vice-President Mike Adams.

# # #

 Find more “News in Jefferson Country” at:

www.JeffersonNewsService.com

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