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Salmon-August Complex Update 9-30-17

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

September 30, 2017- October 2, 2017

Date Started: August 13, 2017               Total Size: 65,882 acres
Cumulative Containment: 81%             Total Personnel:  94

Operational update:  Resources are still being assigned to the Salmon August Complex to meet incident objectives, but you will continue to see a decrease in incident personnel due to seasonal weather conditions, rehab completion, and minimal fire behavior in the Salmon August Complex. Yesterday smokes were observed during the recon flight inside the perimeter of the Wallow Fire around Snowslide Gulch. Fire crews are patrolling and monitoring this area. No other smokes were showing in the Salmon August Complex. A 10 person fire crew has been flown into Shelly Meadows and will be repairing fire line and hiking trails as they work their way towards the Mule Bridge Trailhead.

Wallow Fire: 65,982 acres; 81% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor and repair the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Deep Fire: Approximately 217 acres; 95% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Fourth Fire: One quarter (.25) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Claire Fire: One Tenth (.10) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Mary Fire: 91 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Rush Fire: 3 acres;100% containment. The fire is unstafffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Grizzly Fire: 90 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Garden Fire: 266 acres; 100% containment.The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Bingham Fire: 0.13 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Blaine Fire: 1  Acre; 100% containment.  The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Residents within Siskiyou County will continue to experience smoke impacts from this complex and surrounding fires.  A daily Air Quality Report is posted on the fire’s Inciweb page. For updated smoke forecasts, please visit this link: http://bit.ly/2uSYloh

For updated fire information, please visit InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5501/

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Salmon-August Complex Update — personnel down to 191 !!!

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

September 28, 2017

Date Started: August 13, 2017               Total Size: 65,875acres
Cumulative Containment: 83%             Total Personnel:  191

Operational update: Repair actions covering the majority of areas damaged by suppression actions (such as dozer lines and hand lines) have been completed throughout the Salmon August Complex. Resources will continue working with heavy equipment to repair dozer lines south of Whiskey Butte.

Smokes continue to be observed well inside the perimeter in Snowslide Gulch and Crapo Mountain areas of the Wallow Fire.  The decreasing high pressure system, ahead of an incoming cold front, will continue to heat areas of the fire which may cause increased interior fire activity.  These areas, although well interior of the fire perimeter, will be closely monitored by fire resources. An additional hand crew has been ordered to assist with patrolling and monitoring areas of the fire.

Although temperatures continue to rise and relative humidity is dropping, the fire behavior continues to be minimal. Mostly smoldering and creeping behavior has been observed with occasional larger downed material being consumed; producing increased visible smoke. Firefighters will continue to monitor and patrol the fire perimeter to ensure any visible smokes are well interior, and extinguish any heat sources near the containment line.

The public is reminded, that although all closure orders have been lifted, personnel and resources continue to work on areas of the fire.  There is still smoke, fire, and other hazards that include burning trees, snags, and rolling material that could pose a potential danger to people in the fire area.  Hunters and recreationist are asked to be aware of fire personnel working in and around the fire area, and be observant to hazards, including fire weaken trees, rolling material, and potentially hot ash pits within the fire perimeter.

Due to decreasing operations on the Salmon August Complex, the incident has transitioned to management by a Type 3 Incident Management Team (IMT).  Most of the personnel on this team are based in northern California, including employees of the Klamath National Forest. The Incident Command Post, located outside of Etna has been closed, and the Type 3 IMT will function out of the Salmon /Scott Ranger District Office in Fort Jones.

Wallow Fire: 65,875 acres; 83% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor and repair the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Deep Fire: Approximately 217 acres; 95% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Fourth Fire: One quarter (.25) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Claire Fire: One Tenth (.10) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Mary Fire: 91 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Rush Fire: 3 acres;100% containment. The fire is unstafffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Grizzly Fire: 90 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Garden Fire: 266 acres; 100% containment.The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Bingham Fire: 0.13 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Blaine Fire: 1  Acre; 100% containment.  The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Residents within Siskiyou County will continue to experience smoke impacts from this complex and surrounding fires.  A daily Air Quality Report is posted on the fire’s Inciweb page. For updated smoke forecasts, please visit this link: http://bit.ly/2uSYloh

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Massive Fires Wreak Havoc on Communities in California’s Far North

FIRES, Forestry & USFS, Ray Haupt

KQED News

Huge wildfires burning in far Northern California for weeks have not only charred hundreds of square miles of heavily forested mountain landscape but also disrupted lives and livelihoods.

Firefighters have been battling several fire “complexes” in Klamath and Six Rivers national forests in Siskiyou County, about 275 miles north of San Francisco and just south of the Oregon border, that have burned more than 190,000 acres.

The blazes that the U.S. Forest Service considers part of the Eclipse, Salmon-August and Orleans complexes were ignited by lightning in late July and mid-August. The federal agency says 45 firefighters have been injured battling them.

While the fires have not gotten as much attention because they haven’t consumed homes and threatened buildings in more populated areas, they’ve caused suffering in Siskiyou County, one of the state’s most economically depressed areas.

The Eclipse Complex, at 100,000 acres the largest wildfire in the state, has threatened the towns of Happy Camp, Seiad Valley and Horse Creek close to a year after the Gap Fire destroyed homes in the region.

Three years ago, the Happy Camp Complex burned 135,000 acres and actually rekindled the following summer.

The Eclipse Complex is 50 percent contained, and the U.S. Forest Service says the only way it will be fully contained is with significant help from Mother Nature.

“Honestly, the complete containment will probably be when we get a season-ending event, which is significant rain and significant snowfall,” said Joshua Veal, a spokesman for the Klamath National Forest.

There are extensive areas of the burning timberland that the Forest Service does not send firefighters into because the terrain is so steep. Fire officials attempt to confine the blazes by trying to push them toward natural barriers and previously burned areas.

It’s a practice that’s becoming more common in the region. The frequency of major wildfire activity has increased in the last decade, according to Siskiyou County Supervisor Ray Haupt.

“This is becoming an every year or every other year event,” Haupt said last week. Eight of the 12 communities in his district have been under different kinds of evacuation orders in recent weeks.

“It’s a huge disruption to our normal commerce of agriculture and tourism. It pretty much destroys our recreation industry,” Haupt said.

Smoke from the wildfires have led to extremely unhealthy air conditions for many of the county’s communities for weeks.

“These folks have been in smoke all summer long,” Veal said.

The wildfire smoke, which has also come from major blazes in Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and elsewhere in California, has prompted many local residents to leave for weeks at a time — if they can afford to travel.

The official unemployment rate in Siskiyou County, which includes the towns of Mount Shasta, Weed and Yreka as well as dozens of tiny communities like those along the Klamath, currently stands at 6.7 percent, the state says. But Haupt says the rate in some towns in his district is between 40 percent and 60 percent.

While residents face adversity, the officials coordinating the battle against wildfires in the area face their own obstacles — one of the biggest being a fight to get personnel and equipment in the midst of a bad fire season throughout the West and disastrous weather events in the Southeast.

“We have been in very fierce competition for resources,” said Veal, adding that massive wildfires in Oregon and hurricanes in Texas and Florida have pulled away emergency workers.

A total of about 1,500 firefighters are currently working on the three big Siskiyou County blazes, according to federal officials — about 500 each on the Eclipse, Salmon-August and Orleans fires.

“This issue with these megafires has been that there aren’t enough firefighters in the world to be able to put some of these out,” Haupt said. “The terrain is against you, (and) the weather is against you.”

Firefighters got a break from the weather last week, with cooler, wetter conditions settling in and allowing them to work on tasks like retrieving gear and repairing damage done while building fire lines.

Officials recently lifted fire restrictions in Klamath National Forest, now allowing visitors to have campfires. But there are still a number of closures to recreation areas, including some along the Pacific Crest Trail.

Massive Fires Wreak Havoc on Communities in California’s Far North

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Fire Restrictions Lifted on Klamath National Forest

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

PNP comment: Just in time to build a warming/cooking fire for buck hunters! — Editor Liz Bowen

Yreka, CA – Cooler temperatures, recent rain and snow have prompted the Klamath National Forest to lift its fire restrictions order. “The weather has changed significantly with cooler temperatures and increased moisture,” said Patricia Grantham, Forest Supervisor for the Klamath National Forest. “Therefore, effective September 22, 2017, we are lifting our fire restrictions.”

Lifting of the Forest’s fire restrictions allows forest visitors to have open campfires or camp stoves, as well as use welding equipment, operate internal combustion engines, and smoke.  However, it is important to note that other National Forests surrounding the Klamath National Forest have different weather conditions and may or may have lifted their fire restrictions. Visitors are encouraged to contact other Forests directly.

A valid California Campfire Permit is still required in order to have a campfire.  Permits are available at all of the Klamath National Forest offices. Permits are also available at CALFIRE and Bureau of Land Management offices.

“Northern California fire season is not yet over. Larger fuels in the forest are fairly dry and the potential still exists for new fire starts,” said Grantham. “We ask that visitors use good fire sense and remember to never leave campfires unattended.”

For more information concerning campfire building, extinguishing, and minimizing campfire impacts please visit a local Forest Service office.

Media note:  The CALFIRE burn permit suspension is still in effect. The suspension disallows all non-agricultural burning and residential dooryard burning. The suspension affects all piles, incinerators, and other non-agricultural burning on State Responsibility Area lands. All agricultural burning still requires a permit and an on-site inspection by CALFIRE personnel prior to the burning activity.

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Forest Service tried to quash paper debunking Montana wildlife authority

Agriculture, Federal gov & land grabs, Forestry & USFS, Wildlife

The Westerner.blogspot.com

Monday, September 25, 2017

The U.S. Forest Service has disavowed a legal analysis it commissioned that showed federal land managers have given state wildlife departments more authority than they really possess. In June, the agency asked the University of Montana to remove the draft report five days after “Fish and Wildlife Management on Federal Lands: Debunking State Supremacy” appeared on the Bolle Center for People and Forest’s website. Three weeks later, it terminated a two-year contract with the center and its director, Martin Nie, citing the “provocative title” as a reason. “This is some of the most tedious, boring work I’ve ever done,” Nie told a group of UM students Wednesday. “That’s what’s amazing — how much controversy this has generated.” The beehive Nie and his colleagues whacked concerns who owns and controls wildlife in the nation: state fish and game departments or federal land managers. In 126 pages of Supreme Court citings, legislative history and case studies, the Bolle team argued that “the U.S. Constitution grants the federal government vast authority to manage its lands and wildlife resources … even when states object.” “The myth that ‘the states manage wildlife and federal land agencies only manage wildlife habitat’ is not only wrong from a legal standpoint but it leads to fragmented approaches to wildlife conservation, unproductive battles over agency turf, and an abdication of federal responsibility over wildlife,” the report stated. It found that claim “especially dubious when states assert ownership as a basis to challenge federal authority over wildlife on federal lands.” On August 30, Forest Service Deputy Chief for Research and Development Carlos Rodriguez-Franco wrote Nie another response. “The concerns which led to the termination … arose when a draft article, with a provocative title challenging state legal authorities, was placed on a public website without prior substantive comment from the Forest Service,” Rodriguez-Franco wrote. “(I)t became apparent that the work being conducted by the University was entering the realm of legal services — including interpreting the Constitution, laws and court cases as they pertain to the administration of Forest Service programs — rather than scientific research.” The Forest Service, he explained, was required by law to get its legal advice from the federal Office of General Counsel…more

https://thewesterner.blogspot.com/2017/09/forest-service-tried-to-quash-paper.html

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving this information for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml

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Salmon-August Complex Update 9-23-17

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

Salmon-August Complex Update
September 23, 2017

Date Started: August 13, 2017               Total Size: 65,875acres
Cumulative Containment: 65%             Total Personnel: 426

Operational update: The warming and drying trend will persist today and the humidity will continue to drop.  Firefighters pay particular attention to humidity as the lower the relative humidity, the more readily a fire will burn. The favorable weather allowed for the removal of all hose on the Wallow Fire except for the Sawyers Bar area.

Firefighters patrolled the Deep Fire yesterday and no smoke was visible throughout. One engine and one crew of firefighters will spike camp in the Idlewild area overnight so they can mop up any areas of concern.  Presently the Deep Fire is 90-percent contained and crews will attempt to complete containment of the remaining line.

Today, repair activity will continue along the dozer lines and roads north of Whiskey Butte. Firefighters are installing waterbars and removing hazardous trees that are leaning over the access routes. Hotshot crews completed an impressive eleven-miles of repair work along the Pacific Crest Trail yesterday. Repair work will continue on the North Fork Trail from Mule Bridge and from Cherry Creek and both crews will converge at Right Hand Fork over the next few days.

While fire restrictions are not in place, conditions are still dry and recreationists should be careful with campfires and warming fires. Visitors to the area are reminded to use caution when traveling in the vicinity of the fire.  Be aware of rolling rocks and logs, falling snags and trees and other hazards that are present in recently burned areas. Smoke may be present in some portions of the fire and there may be areas with open flames. There are no closures in place around the Salmon August Complex, however visitors in and around the fire perimeters will encounter heavy equipment and fire apparatus as repair efforts continue. Fire personnel appreciate your patience and caution as they move crews and equipment throughout the area.

Wallow Fire: 65,875acres; 65% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor and repair the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Deep Fire: Approximately 217 acres; 90% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Fourth Fire: One quarter (.25) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Claire Fire: One Tenth (.10) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Mary Fire: 91 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Rush Fire: 3 acres;100% containment. The fire is unstafffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Grizzly Fire: 90 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Garden Fire: 266 acres; 100% containment.The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Bingham Fire: 0.13 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Blaine Fire: 1  Acre; 100% containment.  The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Residents within Siskiyou County will continue to experience smoke impacts from this complex and surrounding fires.  A daily Air Quality Report is posted on the fire’s Inciweb page. For updated smoke forecasts, please visit this link: http://bit.ly/2uSYloh

For updated fire information, please visit InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5501/

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Salmon-August Complex Update 9-21-17

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

September 21, 2017

Date Started: August 20, 2017                Total Size: 65,874 acres
Cumulative Containment: 60%                   Total Personnel: 745

Operational update: Yesterday, firefighters were successful repairing all the fireline in the area of the Kidder spot on the Wallow Fire of the Salmon August Complex, just southwest of Greenview, CA off of the Kidder Road. Additionally, crews from the area north of Whiskey Butte to the area of Knudson Bar were monitoring the fire perimeter and mopping up any areas of heat or burning material along the edge of the fire.  There was a report of smoke late in the afternoon, but fire officials confirmed that the source was from larger diameter fuels burning within the interior of the Wallow Fire.  Since the Great Basin Incident Management Team 7 assumed command of the Salmon August Complex, more than 100,000-feet of fire hose (approximately 19-miles worth) have been removed from the fireline as it is no longer needed for suppression or repair efforts. Crews will continue work to repair the fireline by installing waterbars for drainage. Water moving down trails slows down when it contacts waterbars and is directed off the repaired trail.

The 217-acre Deep Fire is being monitored and firefighters are working to assure the fire is contained and any spread is minimized. Repair efforts around the Deep Fire are ongoing as crews work to rehabilitate the fireline to prevent future erosion from heavy rains and snowfall.

Currently, there are no evacuations in effect for communities near the Salmon August Complex. With snow and anticipated wet weather on the way, the Klamath National Forest has removed the closure order for the Salmon August Complex effective immediately. Recreationists to the area should use caution as firefighters, and heavy equipment are working around the fire perimeter. The recent fire activity in the area has burned into timber stands. Many tree hazards will be obvious as they will display signs of damage (loss of needles, hanging limbs, leaning trunks). Some trees in such steep terrain are shallow rooted and may appear healthy but can be as just as deadly.  Just a small amount of rainfall can loosen the soil requiring little wind to cause a tree to fall.
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The California National Army demobilized from the Salmon August Complex yesterday to ready themselves to be of service elsewhere. Their efforts on the fire contributed to removal of 78,000-feet of hose, 74,000-feet of roadside slash removal, and water bars installed along 31,000-feet of fireline, for a total of 7000 work hours

Wallow Fire: 65,875 acres; 60% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor and repair the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Deep Fire: Approximately 217 acres; 70% containment. Fire fighters will continue to monitor the fire perimeter and mop up any areas of concern.

Fourth Fire: One quarter (.25) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Claire Fire: One Tenth (.10) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Mary Fire: 91 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Rush Fire: 3 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstafffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Grizzly Fire: 90 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Garden Fire: 266 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Bingham Fire: 0.13 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Blaine Fire: 1 – 3 Acres; unknown containment.  Aircraft provided retardant and water drops yesterday.  Smokejumpers will staff the fire today.

Residents within Siskiyou County will continue to experience smoke impacts from this complex and surrounding fires.  A daily Air Quality Report is posted on the fire’s Inciweb page. For updated smoke forecasts, please visit this link: http://bit.ly/2uSYloh

For updated fire information, please visit InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5501/

For evacuation information, please visit CODE RED: http://www.co.siskiyou.ca.us/content/codered-emergency-alert-system
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KNF: Closure Order Lifted for Salmon August Complex

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

September 20, 2017

YREKA, CA. – The emergency closure for the area affected by the Salmon August Complex has been lifted—effective September 21, 2017.  “We are able to re-open this part of the Klamath National Forest because of reduced fire activity and hard work of the firefighters” stated Forest Supervisor Patricia Grantham. Forest visitors are urged to be extra careful because of fire weakened trees as well as loosened debris on steep slopes. Intermittent closures may be required along the Pacific Crest and Mule Bridge Trails as hazard reduction treatment is completed.

As fire conditions permit additional emergency closures are expected to be opened in the near future. Notices will be posted in news releases, on Inciweb and the Klamath National Forest web site.

The Salmon August Complex is currently at 65,874 acres and 55% contained. The southern boundary of the affected area parallels the Sawyers Bar Road along the North Fork Salmon River. From the southern boundary the affected area projected about 12 miles north into the Marble Mountain Wilderness.  A full description and maps of the affected area is available on the Klamath National Forest website www.fs.usda.gov/klamath).

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USFS: Fall Burns Planned to Reduce Hazardous Fuels and Improve Forest Health

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

September 20, 2017

Yreka, CA

Although still engaged in the latter portion of the 2017 fire season, the Klamath National Forest would like our cooperators and public to know we are beginning preparations for fall prescribed burning. The 2017 fire season provided significant firefighting challenges.  In order to meet future challenges in the most effective way possible, the Forest will continue to use prescribed burning as a tool in our mission to reduce build-up of hazardous fuels, restore forest ecosystems, and improve resiliency and safety of communities within the wildland urban interface.
Planned projects include burning piles of stacked materials and low to moderate intensity understory burns of vegetation on the forest floor. The main goals of these projects are to reduce the severity of future wildfires and provide added protection for communities in the wildland urban interface. In addition, the burns will promote a diverse and more resilient forest, and improve habitat for wildlife.
The burns will take place on the Salmon/Scott River, Happy Camp/Oak Knoll and Goosenest Ranger Districts between now and June 2018. The actual dates of ignition will depend on local weather and fuel conditions.
All prescribed fire projects will be conducted in accordance with an approved burn plan to ensure the safety of people and property in the area. Burn plans describe the specific conditions under which burns will be conducted including the weather, number of personnel, and opportunities to minimize smoke impacts.
Visitors are asked to avoid areas where prescribed burns are being conducted. Some spur roads near the burn areas may be inaccessible during operations. As a result of the burns, some residents and visitors may see or smell smoke. They may also witness glowing from the fires at night. People should not be alarmed; the fires will be carefully monitored. Local authorities will be notified prior to burn days and kept informed throughout burning operations.
Following is a list of prescribed fire projects (with acreage and locations) currently planned for this fall, winter and spring:

Goosenest Ranger District

  • Tennant – 653 acres of understory burning approximately one mile east of the community of Tennant. This project is designed to reduce hazardous fuels in order to protect Tennant and other private lands from wildland fires as well as to improve wildlife habitat.

  • Lookout – 582 acres of understory burning on and around Lookout Butte, approximately four miles north of Medicine Lake.

  • First Creek912 acres of understory burning between Goosenest Mountain and Little Deer Mountain, approximately two miles north of Grass Lake.

  • Jones -168 acres of understory burning on the lower northeast slope of Goosenest Mountain. This project is designed to reduce hazardous fuels, enhance wildlife habitat, promote Baker Cypress regeneration, and protect adjacent private lands from future wildland fires.

  • Pile Burning –Approximately 2,000 acres at various locations throughout the district of piled slash from fuel reduction and vegetation management projects.

For more information contact Fuels Technician Brandon Dethlefs at (530)398-5727

Salmon River Division

  • Salmon River Site Preparation (Salmon Salvage and Butler Piles)–  406 acres of understory burning for site preparation in areas burned in the 2013 Forks Complex Fire approximately 3 miles west of Sawyers Bar, CA (Kelly Gulch & Little North Fork areas).

  • Sawyers Bar Fuels Reduction– 40 acres of understory burning directly north of Sawyers Bar, CA.  Prescribed burns will occur on the south face of Tanner’s peak, in areas not affected by the 2013 or 2014 complex wildfires.

  • Petersburg Fuels Reduction– 1,471 acres of understory burning directly southeast of Cecilville.

  • Additional Pile Burning– Approximately 1,120 acres in the following areas: Music Creek (400 acres), Whites Gulch (200 acres), Sawyers Bar Road between Whites Gulch and China Creek–including Idlewild Campground (100 acres), Six Mile Road (120 acres), Petersburg Pines Project south of Cecilville (150 acres), and in the Butler fire area approximately 3 miles South and East of Forks of Salmon (150 acres).

For more information contact Fuels Specialist Ron McEwen at 530-468-1271.

Scott River Division

  • Scott Bar Mountain Underburn– Approximately 1500 acres near Jones Beach and Beauty Flat west of Fort Jones, CA.  Re-entry prescribed underburn initiating taking several years to complete

  • Jack250 acres prescribed burning of logging slash from Jack Conventional and Jack Helicopter timber sales.  Areas include Jackson and Grizzly Creek near Camp Eden and 3 Sugar Creek Units on road 41N14 road.

  • McBaldy250 acres of prescribed fire underburning in the Deadwood Baldy Peak area.

  • Pile Burning-Approximately 1,200 acres across the Scott River Fire Division: 388 acres along the Scott River WUI, 145 acres in Westside Fire Recovery, 71 acres in the Tennessee Thin and Stradler project, and 93 acres in the Singleton project. 503 acres of landing piles from various locations on the district (Collins ridge, lake mountain, whiskey butte, Singleton Timber Sale)

For more information contact Fuels Specialist Josh Schmalenberger (530) 468-5351.

Happy Camp/Oak Knoll Ranger District

  • Walker Site Prep – 1700 acres, broadcast, jackpot piles, South of Slinkard Peak. Treatment of post-fire and salvage generated slash for reforestation in a portion of 2014 Happy Camp complex.

  • Jackson Peak Underburn – 1900 acres, underburn, north of Slater Butte Lookout, surrounding Jackson Peak.

  • Happy Camp Cultural Burns – Four acres, underburn, north of Happy Camp, in and near West Branch Campground.

  • Mt Ashland LSR – 600 acres, hand piles, 450 acres landing piles– units are spread from Siskiyou Gap to Four Corners to Beaver Creek Education Center.

  • Dutch Dog Unit 5 -100 acres, understory burn (possibly with piles along control lines) – FS Road 40S01/FS Road 12/FS Road 46N42.

  • Roadside Pile Burning -Various roadside piles from woodcutters, vegetation management, and road maintenance – a number of acres throughout district.

  • Machine Pile Burning – 230 acres, machine piles, in the Doolittle, Sutcliffe and Seider timber sales, and along dozer lines created during the Happy Camp Complex, located throughout the district.

  • Additional Hand Pile Burning– Approximately 1000 acres located throughout the District.

For more information contact Fuels Specialist Matt Watson at (530) 465-1520.

 

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Salmon-August Complex Update 9-19-17

FIRES, Forestry & USFS

September 19, 2017

Date Started: August 13, 2017                Total Size: 65,893 acres
Cumulative Containment: 50%                   Total Personnel: 814

Operational update: Cooler temperatures yesterday gave firefighters a bit of an advantage on the fires of the Salmon-August Complex. On the east side of the Wallow fire, approximately 10-miles from the community of Greenview, CA, the fireline construction is completed, but many things remain to be done to make the fireline “safe” and put the fire out close to the containment lines. This work is called mopup. The objective of mopup is to put out all fire embers or sparks to prevent them from crossing the fireline. Today crews will be mopping up on the north side of the fire near Cabin Creek, and on the east side of the fire approximately 6-miles northeast of Etna, CA. Firefighters are patrolling north and south of Whiskey Butte and putting water on hot spots along the area adjacent to the line to be certain no fire can blow, spot, or rollover the fireline under the worst possible conditions anticipated. Firefighters are also continuing work on the fireline three and a half miles north of Sawyers Bar.

On the Deep Fire, the firefighters will continue to monitor and patrol the approximately 200-acre fire. There is containment line around most of the fire. The northern and southern portion will not have a fireline dug around it as crews will use the rocks and cliffs as a natural barrier to contain the fire.

Currently, there are no evacuations in effect for communities near the Salmon August Complex.

A forest closure order is in effect for the portions of Marble Mountain Wilderness until the fire is declared out. The Pacific Crest Trail No. 2000 (Pacific Crest Trail) is included in the new closure from the intersection with Forest Trail No. 5545 (Kidder Creek Trail) to its intersection with Forest Trail No. 5542 (Shackleford Trail). Details of closure points can be found on InciWeb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5501/#

Wallow Fire: 65,893 acres; 50% containment.  Fire fighters will continue to construct and improve lines near Cabin Gulch.

Deep Fire: Approximately 217 acres; 50% containment.  Fire fighters will continue to construct and improve containment line.

Fourth Fire: One quarter (.25) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Claire Fire: One Tenth (.10) acre; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Mary Fire: 91 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Rush Fire: 3 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstafffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Grizzly Fire: 90 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Garden Fire: 266 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Bingham Fire: 0.13 acres; 100% containment. The fire is unstaffed, but will continue to be monitored.

Blaine Fire: 1 – 3 Acres; unknown containment.  Aircraft provided retardant and water drops yesterday.  Smokejumpers will staff the fire today.

Residents within Siskiyou County will continue to experience smoke impacts from this complex and surrounding fires.  A daily Air Quality Report is posted on the fire’s Inciweb page. For updated smoke forecasts, please visit this link: http://bit.ly/2uSYloh

For updated fire information, please visit InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5501/

For evacuation information, please visit CODE RED: http://www.co.siskiyou.ca.us/content/codered-emergency-alert-system
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